filing flats on a socket

I'm making a special tool out of a 3/8 drive socket. It'll have to be turned by a wrench or gripped by vise jaws. I'll file flats on the
square end.
Should the flats be parallel with the square's sides, or have the point in the middle? This is a high-torque situation.
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On Thursday, June 18, 2020 at 6:09:37 AM UTC-5, maxq wrote:

I'm not smart enough to reinvent the wheel:
https://www.harborfreight.com/3-piece-square-drive-socket-caps-67011.html
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On 6/18/2020 10:50 AM, wws wrote:

That's one of those things that are so cool that I buy them and then never use them. LOL
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 10:59:15 -0400, Bob Engelhardt

I'm guilty of the same practice. I shop at $1 Gewjaws R Us.
--
There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

--Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message

I was using a 1" to 3/4" square drive adapter from such a store on a neighbor's truck lug nut and sheared it off. The guys watching were VERY impressed that I'm that strong, not knowing the adapter was weak instead.
The same happened to me in the Army. Paint obscured the L on a truck wheel stud and a friend and I stripped it by wrenching the wrong way. When I admitted what I'd done without implicating the helper the mechanics' attitude toward me jumped from dismissive to respectful, and they taught me a lot about maintenance, such as how to replace that flat tire on a split rim wheel. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M35_series_2%C2%BD-ton_6x6_cargo_truck
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On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 07:39:48 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Who knew that melted potmetal rebar was that weak? Congrats on the strength, too. ;)

Deuce and a half split rims? PASS. Those could be deadly as you seated the bead. I know a guy who rode one and lived. And I saw a video of one take a guy's head clean off. If they taught you split rim stuff, I'm not so sure they were respectful. LOL
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message wrote:
Deuce and a half split rims? PASS. Those could be deadly as you seated the bead. I know a guy who rode one and lived. And I saw a video of one take a guy's head clean off. If they taught you split rim stuff, I'm not so sure they were respectful. LOL
The bulged pipe and rebar cage for inflating them clearly showed what can happen, and they made sure I understood the procedure.
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On Saturday, June 20, 2020 at 5:17:44 PM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

I was working in a tire shop (half a century ago) when one let loose in the cage. Very impressive sound and fury. Since then, I don't drive next to trucks.
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"rangerssuck" wrote in message wrote:

I was working in a tire shop (half a century ago) when one let loose in the cage. Very impressive sound and fury. Since then, I don't drive next to trucks. ================================They showed me how to confirm that the ring was fully seated all around, basically hose & brush all the mud off before starting, but I also no longer drove beside trucks unless there was enough space to quickly pass.
Another motor pool lesson was to use only soap or talcum powder, never petroleum grease, when installing a tube or seating the bead on a drop-center rim. I later caught flak from a boss who suggested grease when I was fixing power wheelchairs. Eventually he walked by muttering about You Damned Army Guys, as though someone else had agreed.
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On Sat, 20 Jun 2020 13:06:09 -0700, Larry Jaques

If you don't have a proper cage, for ceying out loud use LOTS of strong chains!!!!
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wrote:

Yeah. This was back in the '70s, before cages were mandatory. Are split rims even allowed on the road any more? LOL
--
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In 1963, I was driving (actually, living in) a baffed out Metro bread van, reliable and idestructable. And no spare. Big ol' 17" tires? Who needs a spare?
And one night, about 8:30, 100 yards from a service station that would be closing in half an hour, I had a flat. Went into the garage, asked to get the tire fixed. No way, won't do it. Why not, I ask.
And the guy just points to the 20' ceiling where there is a deep circular indentation made by an escaped split rim. I hadn't known about split rims before that.
(All was well, though. He called some old guy out in the woods who came into town, fetched me and my tire, took me to a dimly lit barn/workshop with other old geezers hanging about smoking and drinking beer, fixed the tire with nary a quibble about afterlife and took me back to my truck. And no, he didn't have a cage.)
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message

Yeah. This was back in the '70s, before cages were mandatory. Are split rims even allowed on the road any more? LOL
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 10:59:15 -0400, Bob Engelhardt

Somewhat like a finger ratchet?
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 07:50:28 -0700, wws wrote:

caps-67011.html
Can't access the end - tool slides along an axle. Can't drill a hole crossways either (well you could but it wouldn't help any).
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"maxq" wrote in message
On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 07:50:28 -0700, wws wrote:

caps-67011.html
Can't access the end - tool slides along an axle. Can't drill a hole crossways either (well you could but it wouldn't help any).
==============================Offset box wrench?
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 16:43:35 +0000 (UTC)

You might want to post the problem, what you're trying to do and see if anyone has a different solution ;-)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 13:28:29 -0400, Leon Fisk wrote:

Old freewheel remover, the correct tool is NLA.
The freewheel has an internal splined face for the remover. The remover has to slide over the axle and into the freewheel top, axle pokes out the end of the remover.
The socket will get matching splines ground from its outer circumference at the nut end.
A 12-point 9/16" socket is the right size, plus I can index it off a bolt head - mount bolt in locked lathe chuck, head out with a strong spring between the chuck face and the socket (mounted on the bolt with the nut end outward). Dremel with 5 stacked cutoff disks on carriage, grind a slot, pull the socket towards the face and switch points, grind the next slot.
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 21:27:59 +0000 (UTC)

Yeah, know exactly what you're talking about and probably have the one you need. Think I have two of them, most likely fit old Shimano 5/6 sprocket free wheels. You're welcome to borrow them if you're near Grand Rapids, MI area :)
Before buying them I was able to use a large nut that fit the spline (sorta) and had the threads drilled out of it. Use the axle nut to hold it square. Should do that with the real ones too. Have to back off the axle nut some as you make progress...
It's been a long time since I last messed with the freewheel. Don't ride much anymore... There are some listed on Ebay:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=freewheel socket
In case you haven't checked there yet ;-)
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 18:11:47 -0400
<snip>

Actually have four of them but only one splined. Checked an old Shimano Freewheel that I know it fits and a 9/16 socket will slip inside. A sharp edged 3/4 nut will catch the splines (12) in the freewheel... Sounds like you need one a bit smaller in diameter than this :(
With all the metric and standard nuts around nowadays I would try modifying one of those first. Even better if you happen to find a coupling nut that fit, would give a longer length to work with...
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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