find small battery drain



I cleaned the small shop out and pushed the truck in. Like putting two pounds of stuff in a one pound bag. The truck started immediately after I put it in the shop, not even slow to turn over or anything. Lights hardly dimmed while turning over.WTF?
I guess I'll replace both battery cables tommorrow and look for the slow battery drain. The whole truck has Minnesota cancer and I guess I'm due for stuff like this.
Karl
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Are you sure you don't have a corroded contact? They can be temperature sensitive.
Steve
Karl Townsend wrote:

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"Karl Townsend" wrote: (clip) The truck started immediately after I put it in the shop, not even slow to turn over or anything. Lights hardly dimmed while turning over.WTF? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Not "WTF" at all. In one of my posts I said, " The starter could be frozen, either with rust, or (less likely) with ice." Evidently it was ice.

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You may want to take the battery into an auto parts store for testing. The car battery pulled this type of trick on me 2 or 3 times before it just crapped right out. Won't start, poke, prod, don't find problem, starts up...if a cell has high resistance, the lights light fine, but the starter draws more current than the battery can supply. The battery charger sees the thing as fully charged, since the high resistance drives the voltage up when charging.
Then again, on the truck, the starter did the same thing (Won't start, poke, prod, don't find problem, starts up...) Battery tested fine. Starter can also be tested, but is more of a pain to pull out and test. If the battery is fine with a load test (not just "the charger thinks it's fine), start looking elsewhere (pull the starter, etc).
The backhoe had a bad crimped on connector on a battery cable that looked OK, but had high resistance.

Fooli$h to replace part$ without testing. Cables are dead-easy to test (put an ohmmeter on them), but are not the most likely culprits; battery, starter, starter solenoid, dirty connections (no replacement needed, just clean and grease.)
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Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

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On Mon, 05 Mar 2007 13:38:24 GMT, "Karl Townsend"

Likely means "check and clean battery connections" Could mean new starter - could even mean seized engine.
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Karl Townsend wrote:

Hold the key on start for about 5 to 10 seconds and then look for a hot spot on the power wiring going to the starter, battery terminals, starter terminals and such. If the whole wire is evenly warm you have a bad starter or a siezed engine.
John
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On Mar 6, 12:38 am, "Karl Townsend" < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net remove .NOT> wrote:

Hi Karl, gee mate - your are doing it hard - 10 degrees and icy slush on the floor....no wonder you dont want to get into pulling out the starter motor.
One thing you did has me wondering, and it comes back to the battery question....
You say the charger meter indicated full charge - no, it doesn't, it tells you that there are 12 volts on the battery terminals. It doesnt tell you the actual state of each cell - 1 can be high resistance, and will act as a choke if you try and draw a LOT of current out of it, ie the starter motor. (I assume its a real truck, not some pissy little thing pretending to be a truck, so its got a big motor. And if its a diesel, makes it 10 times worse...)
Why do I think this - well, you say the headlights DIED when you hit the starter button. Go very dim, yes, but DIE - that, to me, indicates that the battery is crook. And it also shows that the starter motor is TRYING to draw heaps of current...
I ask again - can you try another battery, is the battery you just fitted a new one, or a spare thats been lying around the place for years - (and has been through the same winter that killed the original battery) see if you can borrow one from a neighbour, or even if the neighbour can bring his car round and you try and jump start the truck.
All the other advice about checking terminals, bolts, cables etc is very sound.
But, been round long enough to know that, sometimes, you get sidetracked into a scientific, complex explanation when its really simple...
And so saying all that, you are staring at the truck, and I am sitting in my workshop with the air conditioner running comp laing about the heat....(Just coming into our Autumn, but Gunners Martian SUV's emissions have stuffed up the seasons here - still hot...)
BTW - loved your apple testing explanation, got sucked in just as much as the schoolkids did....well done!. I guess American country people like setting up their city cousins just as much as ours do....
Andrew VK3BFA.
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Karl Townsend wrote:

Check ground from battery to engine block.
--
John L. Weatherly
Nashville, TN
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On Mon, 05 Mar 2007 09:04:42 -0600, "John L. Weatherly"

Blink blink?
Gunner
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On Mon, 05 Mar 2007 16:47:49 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Gunner

Erm, that's called the Negative Battery Cable, Gunner. You've never heard of one? <g> I saw quite a few (half a dozen?) fray at the block end connector when I was wrenching for a living, working on all sorts of older cars.
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but by the moments that take our breath away.
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On Mon, 05 Mar 2007 17:36:23 -0800, Larry Jaques

The ground is a current draw device?
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
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Terminology - ground and negative are used interchangeably...(sp) - a hangup from the days when radio chassis were at ground potential.....
Andrew VK3BFA.
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wrote:

Yes..but I was a bit nonplussed by having a vehicle that has a unknown current draw and someone suggesting check the ground connection. If it were bad..it would not conduct..and if it were good..what current draw is it performing? Its simply a conduit.
Which reminds me..I had a similar problem with my old Chevy van..and the draw turned out to be the glove box lightbulb. The switch had failed and the bulb remained on, even with the glovebox closed. Took about a week for the battery to run down.
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
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wrote:

The problem with senior son's '68 Firebird was a well rusted horn relay. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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wrote:

Switches for glove box lights, underhood lights, trunk lights, and stop lights are all common causes of hard to find battery drain.
Don Young
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    Except with cars from the UK - at least my MGA was positive ground. It also used two 6V batteries in series -- one on either side of the driveshaft behind the seats (no need to say *front* seats, as there were no back seats. :-)
    This made it a bit more difficult to install some things made for the USA market. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Tue, 06 Mar 2007 06:50:03 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Gunner

will.
-- Don't take life so seriously. You'll never get out of it alive. --Elbert Hubbard
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On Mon, 05 Mar 2007 10:08:09 GMT, "Karl Townsend"

Clock, CD/radio with memory ?
The CD/radio in my caravan regularly discharges the battery if left for a couple of weeks.

I would much prefer to work in 39C conditions, as it was today, while unloading my lathe than have a frozen posterior. VBG Alan, in Gosnells, Western Oz. VK6 YAB VKS 737 - W 6174
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message

Get a small hand-held compass. Hold it close to any wire/circuit. Needle will deflect on the slightest current.
Ken.
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"Ken Davey" wrote: Get a small hand-held compass. Hold it close to any wire/circuit. Needle will deflect on the slightest current. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ That's a really NEAT idea. Since you will be working around a lot of steel, don't expect the compass to point the same way as you move around. It might be a good idea to have a second person to make and break the circuits, so you can look for pulsing in the compass.
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