Ford E350 Econoline questions

On Thu, 17 May 2007 17:15:17 GMT, "Tom Gardner"


Thanks! Good advice too.
Gunner
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The mileage will depend on how much weight you load into it. If your gonna carry alot of heavy tools, equipment, and materials plan on less than 10mpg.
Unless you do all of your own repairs the cost of maintaining this almost 20 year old vehicle may equal the monthly payments on a new one.
The mileage on any E-250/350 new or old will be pathetic as you approach the full GVW

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Not so with mine! The best mileage I get is 17 mpg with 6 guys and all our gear, about a ton, on fishing trips. I often haul a 1700 lb pallet of wood blocks and the van rides better and gets much better mileage...go figure! In the city I get 12-14, depending how I drive and what season mix is in the gas. Summer mix works best. I do have banded LT tires at 80 PSI. Repairs are expensive but the parts are all very heavy-duty and last longer than 1/2 ton parts.
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My company runs quite a few E250/E350s , we only get 9mpg with the 350's and 11 with the 250's (with the V6's and small V8's)
They are using for plumbing work so we carry alot of fittings, pipe, toolboxes, and metal bins, the weight adds up, GVW around 6000-8000#
Our next vehicle buys will be diesel Sprinters.

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I would expect 28m/USg from a current UK Ford Transit with a diesel engine and similar GVW. Very little difference between local town work and cruising at 70mph.
Mark Rand RTFM
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I had a 1980 Econoline Super Van with the extended tail. It had a straight six and got horrible gas mileage, maybe 11 mpg lightly loaded. Not too bad overall, but the I-beam suspension in the front chews up tires and is not cheap to align. At work we just got rid of an '89 E350 with a blown engine and have a '90 that's been fairly decent. The sliding doors are typically problematic.
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On Thu, 17 May 2007 11:51:17 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Gunner

You couldn't afford the gas, Gunner.
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=- Life is full of little surprises. --Pandora
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On Sat, 19 May 2007 09:17:58 -0700, Larry Jaques

Thats what Im wondering about.
Gunner

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Gunner wrote:

My 24 foot diesel box truck will get a lot better milage than that thing. I get almost 15 mpg. on a Ford F750 diesel.
John
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Anyone know where I can get a diesel service truck or van for under $2000 that only needs minor work?
Gunner
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You can get halfway decent older Japanese diesel box trucks for about 3 to 4 grand, at least on the east coast. They are fairly reliable but repairs (and tires) when needed can be expensive. Once you get into a commercial truck category you are also subject to commercial truck stops- unannounced roadside inspections that can lead to large fines. Meanwhile they let the really dangerous overloaded Econolines with deadly projectiles bungy-strapped to their roofs drive by.
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ATP* wrote:

My truck was orginally a 1994 Ryder truck that was sold to an outfit that went bankrupt. I bought the thing at auction for 3100 bucks. I expected to pay more but I got lucky. nd money left over so I bought a 1995 Aerostar van that had a cracked windshield for 900 bucks. The windshield cost 150 and I drove the truck for three years and 30k miles.
I see a lot of trucks advertised with machinery auctions that might work for you. There is a PPL auction coming up next month. They get rid of a lot of their vehicles at that auction.
John
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But whereat starts the "commercial truck category"? Serious question - the need for a class B license (Commercial Drivers License, straight truck) doesn't kick in until 26,001 pounds GVW - but I seem to recall that my brother's 12,000 lb flatbed was a hassle in part because it was considered "commercial", and he had to maintain a driving log, pull over at weigh stations, etc. for/with the dang thing. Yet u-haul will rent any schmuck a 25,999 lb GVW truck...
It cannot be as simple as "does it have a commercial plate", since every pickup truck in Vermont appears to have a commercial (or at least "truck") plate. In Massachusetts, a personal use pickup gets a "car" plate, while a work truck (or any dually) gets a "commercial" plate.
I've been semi-considering a shortbed cab-over diesel flatbed which seem to show up used for $4-9,000 - sometimes even with 4WD, and in the 9-18 thousand pound GVW class. The whole question of "what level of hassle comes with" is part of the consideration.
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wrote:

A lot of laws seem to kick in at 12,000 pounds GVWR. However, the appearance of the truck is also a factor. If it's a cab forward truck, they pull it over. A dually pickup might be able to cruise by.
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ATP* wrote:

I run my truck commercially. It has a gross vehicle weight of 23,900 lb. and has hydraulic brakes. I am required to have it inspected every six months and have to carry a medical card ( i get inspected every two years). If I run the truck out of state I would need a federal DOT number.
I have been stopped twice by the state roving dot cops. Not a big deal. They were nice enough, told me I had to have a medical card but the rest of the truck was in good shape. The same inspector stopped me a month later and checked to see if I had the medical card which I did. Last month one of them pulled out and followed me up the hill and when half way up made a U turn and went back to where he was sitting. Probably he ran my plate and found that I was stopped twice already in the last year.
18.000 lb. is when most of the regulations kick in. Air brakes require a CDL. CDL licenses cost more money and heaven forbid you get a ticket when you are driving your car. The fines go way up if you have a CDL. If I were gunner I would get a good diesel van or pickup and a good trailer to put all his junk in. Registration is a lot cheaper on a trailer than a bigger truck and you can unhitch the trailer when you don't need the capacity. This 24 ft. box truck is a pain to maneuver but since I use it mainly to run parts to and from my customers, it works fine for me. Average weight of each part is over 2000 lb.. and I have a useful load of about 10,000 lb.
John
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wrote:

Mine's a 17,600 GVWR but basic regulations regarding a fire extinguisher, flares or reflective triangles, etc. apply. Placarding also applies if you're carrying certain cargo. Not a big deal but if it was registered under 12 in NYS they wouldn't even be looking for that stuff.
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ATP* wrote:

One thing you have to watch is pulling a trailer with a combined vehicle weight of more than xxxxxx lbs... not sure. You fall into the catagory that requires a CDL class A. In PA, they will go after you if you look like you fit into that catagory. The fire extuingisher, flares and triangles are a good idea with any vehicle.
John
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On Sun, 20 May 2007 03:42:38 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm,

It all depends on the state's DMV, the newspaper's categories, and the poster's expertise. Very scientific...not.

That's precisely what I've been pondering since a UniMOG is out of my price range (damnit.)
- Metaphors Be With You -
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wrote:

Hummmm...sounds like the Econoline with a diesel would be cool.
Oh..the conduit racks Ive made in the past, have all had a decent and sturdy foot in the front end.
Gunner
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I have a '90 E350 with the 7.3 diesel and E4OD trans. On the highway, it sips fuel. In town, it guzzles it if you don't keep your foot light!
But it'll also haul anything you can stuff into it. I went to Tractor Supply here and bought 50 6" treated fence posts and they didn't want to load them into the van until I told them I'd take the responsibility for weight but not damage if they smacked it with their forklift. The thing barely settled on the springs. (Old Ohio Edison van with 18" raised roof and a 1500 watt inverter)
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