Great idea of a trunnion table!

I love the concept expressed in this auction, what a great idea!
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I want to make my own now...
i
Reply to
Ignoramus30787
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$1800 and the rotary table and vise is not included. Seems pricey.
Nice idea. Remove 333 to reply. Randy
Reply to
Randy333
This is exactly how I feel about it, great idea, steep price.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22698
I've always wanted one of these..
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Reply to
tnik
NO kidding. I'll bet Ig makes an equivalent for under $300.
-- One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: That word is love. -- Sophocles
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Besides being heavy, these are also complicated to use.
Reply to
Ignoramus22698
Yes, it does not seem to be very complicated. Some welding, some CNC machining, not really that much seems to be involved. Just three large pieces of iron is what is needed.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22698
Do you have a CNC rotary table, Ig? They're far more useful than a trunnion for accurate work. Trunnions are basically production tools with multiple sets of fixtures; unless you get into the really expensive ones, they aren't generally high-accuracy devices.
The Haas trunnion with a vise never looked like it made a lot of sense to me. It isn't good for fixturing multiple parts and it doesn't seem to offer a lot over a vertical rotary table, unless your particular part configuration just can't be set up on the table itself.
On the other hand, a rotary table that can be set up vertically can be very useful in a small shop.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Yea, I'm not a hobbyist, We have plenty of machines here that could handle that.
Reply to
tnik
Yes, I do, I think that I showed it and how it turnsto you, but perhaps the beer interfered. :)
This is what I have.
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i
Reply to
Ignoramus22698
Yeah, I thought you had one, and it's pretty substantial.
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Think about what you can fixture on that, set up vertically, with a right-angle plate on the table. Compare that to what you can mount in a vise on a trunnion. I don't think you'll see much difference. If you're thinking of one-off jobs, getting a part set up accurately in a vise probably takes as much time as setting up on the angle plate. If you're thinking of batch work, a little fixturing on the angle plate probably will out-perform the vise.
I just don't see where the trunnion has much to offer. The trunnions I'm familiar with typically have four sets of dedicated fixtures, each holding multiple parts, for higher-volume production work. That makes sense. A single vise on a trunnion doesn't make much sense to me. It looks like a gadget in search of a reason to live.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Mounting a workpiece directly to a rigid, T-slotted tilting table would likely serve the needs of most home shop machinists.
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I bought a nice used USA 8x6" table for about $60 IIRC, several years ago, and it's suitable for mounting other tooling to if needed.. but a more rigid mount with the workpiece clamped directly to the table.
For tiny workpieces, I have a pivot-pin type slotted tilt table about 4" square, or angle vises to use.
The trunnion with integral rotary table looks interesting, but I can't think of much use for it.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
I've seen video, most likely on youtube, of them being used to machine miniature gas turbine rotors or the wax master for lost wax casting. The item looked very much like a turbocharger rotor.
Reply to
David Billington
Once you have the CNC rotary table, however, you already have the multi-axis functionality. Then all that particular trunnion seems to give you is a way to hang a vise out there in space.
My guess is that the current generation of machinists is a lot more comfortable with vises than with angle plates and clamps. The same is true with faceplates on a lathe. Some people will jump through hoops to fixture something on a mill, or in a lathe chuck, that's a piece of cake with a faceplate.
Reply to
Ed Huntress

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