grinders

Is there a general concensus as to a good grinder - standard 2 wheel type? I'm
looking for something sturdy. Voltage and phase requirements aren't a problem.
TIA.
Reply to
Vrstull
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My local machinist's supply has a small used Diehl grinder. The bearings were unbelievably smooth. Thing just kept on running after being unplugged, virtually noiseless.
Reply to
ATP
I have a $14 grinder Lincoln Toolmaster (if my memory about price is correct), it is just as smooth. Keeps on spinning forever after it is unplugged. Also it is very quiet.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23411
The intended use should dictate. In my mind's eye I can see a large grinder, three phase, 12" wheels, 2" wide. Great for a weld shop, not so good for a machine shop, where you might want to sharpen lathe tools. My personal choice for sharpening lathe tools is a grinder mounted about chest height with no work rests. That wouldn't be worth a damn for a weld shop.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
I like all 3 of my Baldors
Gunner
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Reply to
Gunner
That's what I have in my shop, why is it not so good for sharpening lathe tools?
Reply to
ATP
All depends on the nature of the wheels and how they're maintained. If you use the wheels for rough grinding, I doubt you'd have a surface flat enough and smooth running enough to be very successful at sharpening toolbits. The grain size may be a bit coarse, and the wheel too hard for toolbits, too. A soft(er) bond is very desirable for grinding HSS, unlike low carbon steels, where a harder bond is more desirable. Certainly nothing wrong with your choice otherwise. My point is if a guy is going to sharpen toolbits, a smaller grinder makes more sense. If he's going to do heavy duty grinding (weld shop), a smaller grinder makes no sense. Better too large than too small, though. Just match the wheels to the job. You need a basic understanding of wheels in order to do that.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
Some people like the HF 46727
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Reply to
galt_57

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