Help ID Unknown Tool

Hi Group,
I picked up this tool at a flea market and have no idea what it is. It
clearly is for making grooves or creases on something. Pictures are at:
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Is marked H.K.S.Co Newport KY
There is an HKS company in KY which makes gun stuff.
Sal
Reply to
Sal D'Ambra
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I don't know what it is. My question to you is: why did you buy it? - GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
I think this is a sheet metal edge beading tool. Probably used for making small hot air ducts. If you are referring to H & K or Heckler & Koch, it is a German firearm firm, but I am pretty sure they had nothing to do with this. Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
It was inexpensive and I thought it was neat. It would not be the first unknown thing I bought that turned out to be really useful when I figured out what it was.
Sal
Reply to
Sal D'Ambra
I think I saw this in a tinsmith reproduction book - I think it is to make crimps in the end of a piece of flue so that it can be fitted inside the next piece...
Reply to
Emmo
I don't think it's a beading tool, I think it's a crimper. The rolls roll in line with the arms and the depth is about right. Push and pull and tighten the nut to make crimps. I like to pick a spot, go 180 degrees from there, then 90 from there, etc, rather than try to make an incremement like 3/8 come out around the circumference.
You'd loosen the nut, do all 32 or 64 crimps or whatever, then tighten it a bit and do them all again until your duct telescopes into its mate.
--Doug
Reply to
DGoncz
Oh Ho!! He lives and breathes!! Where ya been? What are you up to Doug?
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Reply to
Brian Lawson
"Grant Erwin" wrote: I don't know what it is. My question to you is: why did you buy it? - GWE ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I would have bought it myself it not too expensive. Half the fun is trying to figure it out. And once the use is known, lots of times it becomes LESS interesting.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
After it telescopes into its mate, does the replication process begin?
Reply to
ATP*
"ATP*" wrote: After it telescopes into its mate, does the replication process begin? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Is "telescope" a four-letter word?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
We've moved. First my stuff, then our computers, and just yesterday, The Bed. Today we move dressers.
I'm not doing anything creative right now, but once we deal with this clutter and get used to living here, it'll be easier. Hell, right now, I am just struggling to get an hour of sleep at night, with several hours in bed.
Yours,
Doug Goncz Replikon Research Seven Corners, VA 22044-0394
Reply to
DGoncz
The process pretty much crimps its style, and it shrivels in diameter, so often has to be hand forced.
Reply to
Brian Lawson
I don't believe it is a crimper. The flat rolling anvil would cause it to stretch any metal sort of like a mini english wheel. If there were a mating grove in the flat wheel I could see it working as a crimper but would be horribly slow compared to the plier type crimps I have seen used for HVAC ducting. My vote is for something to do with leather work. YMMV Glenn
Reply to
Glenn
Kinda like Fred Durst.
Reply to
ATP*
Could be used to inlay metal rings on round stuff. Stick the part in a lathe, groove it, position the tool, push a bit, and feed in a soft wire.
Reply to
B.B.
See rec.crafts.textiles.sewing for an example of what I can do on a half night's sleep with the assistance of a few hundred milligrams of Seroquel, and my reply to your post in rcm.
And thanks for asking!
Yours,
Doug Goncz Replikon Research Falls Church, VA 22044-0394
Reply to
DGoncz
Gimme a clue where/how to do that. Google brings up about 3,000 hits on "rec.crafts.textiles.sewing"
Reply to
Brian Lawson
On Mon, 07 Mar 2005 17:51:59 -0500, the inscrutable Brian Lawson spake:
Searching RCTS for " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com" in 2005 shortens the list.
========================================================== I drank WHAT? +
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--Socrates + Web Application Programming
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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