Help with no spark on old 2n tractor

I have a 2n I use to bushhog a grass field. It has been runing fine for abo ut 3 years. A few weeks ago I started having an intermittenant start proble
m. I replaced the points and condenser and now it will not start. The old c oil was cracked I noticed so I put another coil on it I had. (I also tried a new coil which did not help either). I am pretty sure I put everythign to gether right, there is a picture in my manual I got from TSC. The gap is .0 15. (Slight drag with this feeler guage.) The problem is definitely no spar k.
This is the front mount distributor with the square coil. I have contenuity with the top post of the coil and the curly spring on the bottom. I am get ting 12 volts on the wire to the coil but noticed something. With the distr ibutor on the engine, I have trouble getting any voltage when I check the t op terminal of the coil. However, if I take the distributor off the engine, I get the 12 volts. I am assuming I am not getting the voltage when instal led becasue the distributor is grounded to the engine. Does this sound righ t?
I took the distributor off and installed just the coil. I get continutity f rom the top post of the coil to anything including the points inside the di stributor.(regardless if the points are open or closed). I get continuity from the top part of the cap where the other coil terminal rests to the rot or button on the cap. However, with the cap installed I do not get continui ty touching that same spot where the other coil terminal rests on the cap t o any of the spark plug outlets on the cap, even while spinning the distrib utor by hand. I assume this is ok becasue the rotor is not supposed to touc h the actual cylinder terminals inside the cap.
After putting the new points and condenser on I jecked the static timing as is described in the manual with two rulers. (This is difficult to do by yo urself). The best I could tell the tang on the bottom of the distributot is 1/4 inch away from the bolt hole as it should be.
My only guess is there is something drounded on the breaker plate that is n ot supposed to be or something??? I am not sure how to tell or what I need to look for.
As always I appreciate any help!
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wrote:

Time to troubleshoot. Disconnect the low tension wire from the distributor. Turn on the ignition. diconnect the coil wire from the distributor. Hold the coil wire 1/4" from ground and strike the low tension wire to ground. Do you get a small spark at the low tension wire and a zap from the coil wire when you break contact with the Low tension wire? If so, the problem is with the points, condenser, or connections.
If not, you have a coil problem or a bad connection between the distributor end of the low tension wire and the battery (ignition switch, primary wiring, etc)
If you have spark, reconnect the low tension wire, making sure the insulator on the terminal is correctly assembled and the points and condenser are properly assembled so they are not permanently grounded. Tken, with the points open, ground the moveable point with a jumper ot screw driver and see if you get spark (and spark at the coil wire when released). If you do, chances are oretty good the points are old and need burnishing because the tungsten coating is oxidized.
Onother test is to connect a test light from the low tensinn connector to ground with the ignition turned on. The light should light with the points open, and go out with them closed. If the light does not go out either bad points or bad ground. If it does not come on, either bad condenser or the connections at the low tension terminal (point connection on the distributor) assembled wrong.. Disconnect the consenser. If the light goes on and off when the points are opened and closed, the condenser is shorted.
This should pin down the problem.
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Still got the old 6 volt positive ground system? Bet you put in the wrong coil. Also, I'm pretty sure point gap is 0.020" but this will only effect timing for you, not the "no spark" issue.
Everything has to be perfect for the 6 volt system. If haven't changed to 12 volt neg ground, do it now. Ask if you need/want to do this.
Karl
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First, I wouldn't know a '2n tractor' even if someone pointed out one riding by on a bicycle... and also had a little difficulty following what you've done so far.
However, a quick thought... if it has a conventional distributor, check the primary lead going to the points for continuity... and wiggle it in the area where it normally flexes in operation while doing so.
Good luck!
Erik
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A 2N is a small utility tractor made by Ford during the WW II years. It has a fair collector value, especially if you can find the original steel wheels. It features a four cylinder flat head engine rated at 23 hp PTO and 12 hp drawbar (but back then the horses were bigger - taken at a low rpm and not fudged) It is nearly identical to the 9N produced just before the war. After the war a very similar tractor, the 8N, was produced in large volume.
I have an 8N and use it to run an air compressor hundreds of hours a year. This is the most economical tractor I've ever owned. it runs the compressor on a quart of fuel an hour. Don't understand why new technology can't beat it. The key is 400 rpm idle and leaning out the carb idle mixture.
Biggest weakness is the electrical system, 6V positive ground and poor components. If this idiot is still trying to get the original system running, he's screwed.
Karl
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Karl Townsend wrote:

Not sure if it's on a 2N, but the "Marvel" carb used on the later tractors is a bit of a pain as well.
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On Monday, August 5, 2013 7:05:37 AM UTC-5, stryped wrote:

bout 3 years. A few weeks ago I started having an intermittenant start prob lem. I replaced the points and condenser and now it will not start. The old coil was cracked I noticed so I put another coil on it I had. (I also trie d a new coil which did not help either). I am pretty sure I put everythign together right, there is a picture in my manual I got from TSC. The gap is .015. (Slight drag with this feeler guage.) The problem is definitely no sp ark.

nal was touching the base of the distributor, shorting everythign out. I mo ved the terminal a little and all is ok.
Someone said these 2ns are worth something if they have origional wheels? H ow do you tell?

ty with the top post of the coil and the curly spring on the bottom. I am g etting 12 volts on the wire to the coil but noticed something. With the dis tributor on the engine, I have trouble getting any voltage when I check the top terminal of the coil. However, if I take the distributor off the engin e, I get the 12 volts. I am assuming I am not getting the voltage when inst alled becasue the distributor is grounded to the engine. Does this sound ri ght?

from the top post of the coil to anything including the points inside the distributor.(regardless if the points are open or closed). I get continuity from the top part of the cap where the other coil terminal rests to the r otor button on the cap. However, with the cap installed I do not get contin uity touching that same spot where the other coil terminal rests on the cap to any of the spark plug outlets on the cap, even while spinning the distr ibutor by hand. I assume this is ok becasue the rotor is not supposed to to uch the actual cylinder terminals inside the cap.

as is described in the manual with two rulers. (This is difficult to do by yourself). The best I could tell the tang on the bottom of the distributot is 1/4 inch away from the bolt hole as it should be.

not supposed to be or something??? I am not sure how to tell or what I nee d to look for.

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wrote:

Try http://www.yesterdaystractors.com/atrp/values/fordval.htm
--
Cheers,

John B.
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wrote:

The "original" 2n wheels referred to were 6 stud all steel wheels with no rubber tires - just cleats. The 2N was manufactured with both steel and rubber tires.
see
http://www.tractordata.com/photos/F000/221/221-td4-b01-ext315.jpg .
The steel wheels were not very common to start with, and most were updated to rubber after the war. The rim for the rubber tire replaced the steel rim directly with no modifications.
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