High Speed ATC Spindles

With out the 24K high speed spindles so readily available from China I wouldn't be able to do what I do. Not and make any money. I've found a
few Chinese sellers on Ebay seem to sell better motors than others. Look at their feedback, look at the age of their account, and don't buy from the guys who sell cheap spindles or cheap packages. If you do that you get spindles that easily give you several thousands of hours and then only need a bearing swap.
I've never had a true quick change spindle and never used the tool table in a machine until I picked up a Tormach Mill with an automatic tool changer. It was awesome for a couple months, but the ATC started acting up and I had work that needed to be done. I jerked the ATC off the machine and threw it on the floor. Its still on the floor in about the same place it landed when I pulled it off.
I did retain the power draw bar (with some adjustment for better holding power) and continued to use the tool table in the control software. Its certainly not as fast of a machine as the little Chinese mills with the 24K spindles, but I tool changes are a lot faster. I push a button, swap the tool, and press start. Its about as quick as it was for you to read that. Never mind the arguments about the holding power of TTS tooling. Tool changes are fast and easy, and a job that takes a dozen tools only need to be touched off once. If the first tool surfaces the part and establishes zero then every tool after is dead on (or as good as your height gage anyway.)
On my 24K spindle machines they have ER collet spindle noses. Tool changes are slow. Very slow. That's the rule for a tool change. Tool table? Why bother. When you are using mills in a collet its NTHST. Never The Same Height Twice. Unscrew the closer, take it off if you need a mill with a different size shank. Install the new mill. Tighten... and then touch off all over again. I use dial type Z height setters and I get within .0002 .0005 every time for Z height, but it still takes a little time. One might suggest mills with collars, but they can vary depending on how hard you tighten the collet closer. For many things they might be fine, but for features only a couple thousandths deep they aren't always good enough.
Everything up to this point is background.
I've decided that the next big job I do I'm going to get atleast one (maybe 3) of the 24K ATC spindles with the ISO 20 spindle nose. They range in price from about $2800 to a bunch. A lot more than the $500-600 I typically pay for a half decent 1.5KW 24K spindle. I could afford to throw away the money I spent on cheaper spindles when the decent ones were only 500-600. With the jump in functionality comes the indicated jump in price. Is a $2800 ATC spindle going to be the same turd as a $200 ER collet spindle? Throwing away $200 on a lesson is affordable, but not so much $3000. Yes, I've had more expensive lessons than that, but still...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/26/2019 3:38 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:










I should note that this type of spindle starts at about $1800. Not $2800.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.