How do you drill through stainless steel at home?

George Plimpton wrote:


< >> doesn't mean you should always undertake to do it in future.

Pointless and stupid is all you understand.
Speaking of stupid.... It was pretty stupid for you to pretend you choose not to fix a car or drill stainless for any reason other than you simply have no idea how to do those things.
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George Plimpton wrote:

It takes a certain level of ignorance to believe that it is possible to be "able" without ever actually "doing".
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George Plimpton wrote:

Yup.
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On 3/8/2013 12:11 PM, jim wrote:

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On 3/8/2013 11:23 AM, jim wrote:

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I can't speak for anyone else, but I will try a job once to learn how before I send it out. Then I can understand the fab shop when they suggest changes to ease production. That mattered when we were trying to push the state of the art in aircraft digital radios while staying with commercial process limitations. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commercial_off-the-shelf
Too often electronic designers know nothing of creating the package their brainchild must live in. Several times I've entered a project as the lowly lab tech and bootstrapped myself up to systems integrator after showing the engineers I could handle every aspect beyond their initial schematic design, freeing them from its drudgery. Proof-of-concept models I machined at home helped enormously.
Then I have to switch from building to buying as much as possible because I'm swamped with designing and assembling all the circuit boards and coordinating the interfaces between each engineer's part of the circuit.
The difference as a hobbyist is that I allocate more time and less money so the balance shifts toward building. Plus each task I can learn to do on the car brings me closer to truly owning it, instead of it (and the dealer) owning me. My shop may have paid for itself by making special tools from scrap to let me do dealer jobs like $600 timing belt replacements. jsw
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>I'd grind a very small flat spot with a Dremel tool (to prevent the > drill bit from skating) and anneal the end with a propane torch.
Maybe mapp gas with oxygen might be hot enough to punch a hole in stainless steel.
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On Fri, Mar 08, 2013 at 03:13:02PM -0500, Jim Wilkins wrote:

The difference between the men and the boys is the boys can maybe afford to run out and buy every shiny tool on the market, but the men can make their own tools.
Recently I had to drill through a short length of tool steel. Needless to say, titanium-nitride coated bits didn't even start the hole. I found some advice on a web-site which suggested using a torch to remove the temper in the area of the workpiece to be drilled, which was not an option in my case since the item I was working with was about 1" x 1/2" x 1/16". Plus I don't have a forge yet. Another suggestion was to use a wooden dowel and some grit, which is going to take a while.
I ended up hanging a jar of coins from the drill-press handle in conjunction with the dowel method. Periodically you have to replenish the grit under the dowel, but it went through in a few hours. Stainless steel is softer than tool steel, so a carbide tile bit might work instead.
Regards,
Uncle Steve
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Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra and then suddenly it
flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels come.
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wrote:

Here's a thought to keep in mind for the future. It's the way that gunsmiths annealed spots on (case hardened) '03 Springfield receivers, for drilling to mount a scope.
Cut the head off of a 12d nail, or use other appropriately sized pieces of mild steel bar. Chuck the nail or bar in your drill press and mount the work firmly in your vise.
Get the spindle turning at a medium speed, bring the nail down onto the work, and press down firmly. You want to make a spot glow at least dark cherry red from friction.
Take the nail out of the drill chuck and chuck your drill bit. Drill as deep as you need, or as deep as you can. If necessary, remove the bit, re-chuck the nail, and do the whole thing again. The annealing doesn't run very deep.
I've used this method to drill flat springs, and it worked great for me. It also leaves a minimum amount of distortion and a minimal heat-affected zone.
--
Ed Huntress



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Ed Huntress wrote:

Works very well on case hardened items. It is one of the uses I have for cheap/broken drill bits.
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Steve W.

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On Fri, Mar 08, 2013 at 07:54:54PM -0500, Ed Huntress wrote:

Sounds reasonable. I'll test that out one day soon.
Regards,
Uncle Steve
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Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra and then suddenly it
flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels come.
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Ed Huntress Inscribed thus:

Interesting technique, I'll have to remember that one !
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Best Regards:
Baron.
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 19:54:54 -0500, Ed Huntress

Thanks!! Excellent method!!
Saved!
Gunner
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Uncle Steve Inscribed thus:

I've used a similar technique for drilling holes in glass bottles to make table lamps. A copper tube with a groove filed across the end dipped in grinding paste. Slow, but you get a smooth burr free hole. Smoothing the inside is a little harder. :-)
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Baron.
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>It won't help. Suggest you review posts from George Plimpton / Delvin

Several people in labor, mfg, design, etc ... have no theoretical or practical knowledge in metalworking, but still take, send or broker related work out. My problem with people in this group is the sickening bigotry and the convincing sock puppetry.
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Transition Zone wrote:

WHICH group? The thread is crossposted among four newsgroups.
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On 3/9/2013 11:44 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

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On 3/8/2013 3:30 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Persoanlly, I drill small holes first. Then I enlarge the holes to the proper size with a larger "bit".
I simply put some motor oil on the area to keep the tooling cool (mega important) and if I'm using my at home drill press, I follow this chart for RPM rates:
http://www.drill-hq.com/?page_idx5 or http://www.multi-drill.com/drill-speed-chart.htm
#1 important thing to do is use oil or something similar to lubricate and cool the tooling. Otherwise you run into all types of issues.
Much success.
--
http://tinyurl.com/My-Official-Response

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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 08:52:12 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff, Funny you mention your floor-sweeping past, as I also had a summer job at a "plant" filled with metalworking machines and Germans running them (real Germans, with heavy accents).
They 'drilled' .010" holes in jet turbine blades using a machine they called the "EDM" machine. It never once broke a bit because it drilled by automatic feed in a bath of kerosene dialectic simply by shooting electric current through the bit which was merely very close to the steel being 'drilled'.
I think the EDM stood for Electro Dialectric Machining, and the concepts were that the sparks "ate away" the metal.
Needless to say, I didn't bring one home with me...
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On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 17:08:39 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I was born in Germany. Sorry, no accent left.

Today, they use a laser.

I think you might mean Electrical Discharge Mangling: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_discharge_machining >Needless to say, I didn't bring one home with me...
During my Cal Poly Pomona daze, part of the general engineering curriculum was to run the prospective engineer through every possible metal working machine available. If they had it, I tried (to destroy) it. My favorite was the submerged arc welder, where I successfully created a hot powdered metal and flux volcano. Another was a rather large spot welder, where I convinced a not very swift student to apply grease to his sheet metal parts before welding. The result was a small grease explosion, and a burn line across his shirt from elbow to elbow. My councilor decided that electronics would be a safer major for me.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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