Hunting for a small lathe [9x26]

After deciding on the Grizzly G0463 Mill/Drill, it's time to pick out a small lathe.
Rules of the game: 110v Moveable by mere mortals down stairs
Must be able to cut 56TPI threads (used in old Winchester rifles) Spindle bore of 1" or better Distance between centers of 24" or better
Q: Would being able to feed and thread to the left be worth it?
G9972Z 11" x 26" Bench Lathe w/ Gearbox http://www.grizzly.com/products/G9972Z
Motor: 1 HP, 110v Swing: 10-5/8" over bed; 6-3/8" over cross-slide Distance between centers: 26" Travel: 3-1/2" compound; 7" cross-slide; 23" carriage 6 speeds: 150, 300, 560, 720, 1200, 2400 RPM
Feeds and threads to the left only MT#4 spindle nose taper, 1" spindle bore 8-56TPI inch thread range, 27 inch, 11 metric threads .05-3.0mm metric thread range .0023-.013 feed range; 3/4"-8TPI lead screw 3/8" x 3/"8" maximum tool size MT#3 tailstock barrel taper, 2-1/2" tailstock barrel travel 1-3/4" x 8TPI spindle thread 18 longitudinal feed 23" wide x 51" long x 19" high overall dimensions approximate shipping weight of 559 lbs.
LatheMaster model: HD250X750 9 x 30 Lathe http://www.lathemaster.com/LATHEMASTER9x30Lathe.htm
This lathe will cut left hand threads and make cuts away from the chuck with the easy installation of the included feed reverse gear!
Swing over Bed: 9 ", over Cross Slide: 5 7/8" Distance between centers: 30", Carriage Travel: 25" Spindle speeds: 6, (125, 210, 450, 620, 1000, 2000 rpm) Longitudinal Feeds: 2 (.005,.010) 12 Inch (8 - 40TPI) and 12 Metric Threads: 12 (.4 - 3mm) Cross Slide Travel: 4 1/2", Compound Travel: 2 5/16"" Tailstock Taper MT2 Spindle Travel: 2 3/4"
Spindle Taper: MT3, Bore: 20mm (3/4") Motor: 3/4 HP, 110V/60Hz Machine weight: 330lbs.
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wrote:

Huh?????
Randy Replogle
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Randy Replogle

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Is the ability to turn and thread in a direction AWAY from the headstock worth a few extra bucks?
Would that ability ever be nice to have? One task that will come up is threading away from a shoulder on a workpiece in the chuck. Yes, I could thread into the shoulder, but you snooze, you loose, and the tool runs into the shoulder and dorks up both workpiece and tool.
Randy Replogle wrote:

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Can you explain how you intend to do that while not unscrewing your lathe chuck and working from the back side of the cross feed? Most lathes will run in reverse to do what you want but mounting the tool holder is tricky.
Louis Ohland wrote:

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Fools rush in where angels fear to tread. I love the uncertain...
Consider working on a cylindrical workpiece in the chuck. You want to thread it away from the chuck so you can form the shoulder and threads without feeding into the chuck.
As to the toolholder, are you concerned about the toolholder being on the downfeed side? Otherwise, the turning forces are pushing the toolholder out of the toolpost? Mary, mother of multiple hold down bolts, hear my plea...
Oh, heck, I want to turn threads using centers. I just have to come up with an interrupter so the tool is pulled back when the lathe dog swings through. Just as easy as parting between centers.
RoyJ wrote:

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wrote:

You can cut threads between centers. Leave a little extra material to clamp the dog on then cut it off later.
And never part between centers, at least not all the way through. Unsupported spinning parts can hurt you.
Randy Replogle
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Randy Replogle

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Randy Replogle wrote:

Hmm, I wonder if a mandrel would work for barrels.

That was tongue in cheek. In a metalworking class at a local Tech college, I saw a 3 or so HP Bridgeport vertical mill with braille labels on it.
My idea of realistic is NOT doing a Helen Keller on a big machine while big cutting tools are moving.
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<Yes, I could thread into the shoulder, but you snooze, you loose, and the tool runs

I don't know about most of the guys on the group, but when I am threading, the last thing on my mind is snoozing. For me, anyway, it takes a huge chunk of my attention. Bill.
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Whether or not one is eagle eyed and strung out on coffee, trying to stop cutting a thread while traveling into a shoulder is not for the faint hearted.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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wrote:

Dont spend the extra money. Threading to a shoulder is common practice.There are some tricks of the trade involved. Now you've gained some respect for professional machinists. :)
Randy Replogle
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Randy Replogle

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Where is a good source for understanding this technique?
Crashing into the shoulder of a barrel while threading the shank is not on my list of things that I'd like to do.
Randy Replogle wrote:

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wrote:

I like to cut a "runout groove" where the threaded secton meets the shoulder. This is at least one threadwidth and a little deeper than the thread. You can do it with your parting tool. You still have to be alert but when the threading tool enters the runout groove disengage the threading lever and the tool just sits there in the groove as the part turns. This allows you to back the tool out and set up for the next pass at your leisure.
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Randy Replogle

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<I like to cut a "runout groove" where the threaded secton meets.......> I agree with Randy. Fainthearted? No. But you really, really need to pay attention when you get close to this end of your threading. Bill.
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On 1 Apr 2006 19:34:46 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Odd..I can thread on my lath up to about 1000 rpm, right up to a shoulder. Works pretty good
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
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snipped-for-privacy@lightspeed.net says...

I could see that coming. <g> I rarely single point threads, but when I do, my Feeler HLV-H clone makes me look quite good.
Ned Simmons
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I used to cut barrel threads on a Clausing Colchester 14X40 that had a high speed threading attachment. It disengaged automaticly when the carraige hit a preset stop. 16 tpi at 600 rpm. It was scary when I first used it thinking I'm gonna hit the shoulder, but it never did. I wish I had that attachment on my 5914. Anybody ever seen one one? Tom

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