I-Beam Trolley Ideas


I've been forgetting to ask if there are any great ways to design a
I-beam trolley for a winch. Awhile back we unloaded a machine and the
chain slipped around a cast part and jarred the whole crane
contraption I have in the shop. The light weight electric hoist
trolley that wasn't in use jumped up and pivoted right off and came
slamming down.
Anyhow, now I don't trust this thing and have to make one myself.
Pictures would probably be enough to go on. I just come up with
bearings on bolts or I could make pins, but unsure if I should mill up
some sides and then weld up a channel and then weld the pins in place
or what. Four wheels, or 6, and should they be slightly angled to
match the tapered beam? The end of the beam doesn't have access.
Maybe I'm just hung up on the idea of being able to take it apart. Is
that really necessary? Hmmm I guess it would be a bitch cutting the
thing off if (?) I destroy it.
SW
Reply to
Sunworshipper
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This is a 1 Ton HF trolley on rails made of 3" channel iron:
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I had to turn the trolley wheels down to fit into the channel.
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text is wrong, there are no gears and the bearings on mine weren't sealed. It disassembles easily by removing the nuts on the large shaft.
Three inch channel is marginal or inadequate for a ton but I don't think I've lifted half that with it yet.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
A properly designed and installed trolley should not be able to jump off, even if the wheels are destroyed. However, it's all too common that they are not installed correctly, especially if they are also adjustable to fit multiple sizes of beam. IIRC, it was one of those (locking pins not installed) that ended the long run of no lost time accidents at the local paper mill at a bit over half-a-million manhours. It hurts when one falls on your head, even if you did remember your hard-hat.
Anyway, the design should include flanges that are secured running close enough to the web that there is no way to get the trolley off without taking it apart, and means of securing it together that cannot become unscrewed (cotter pins or the like on nuts and bolts). It's hopefully obvious that the flanges need to be strong enough to support the entire load plus considerable safety factor, as they would only come into play if the wheels are destroyed, probably indicating an overload condition.
There's probably also a good argument for not building one yourself, as opposed to buying one that's properly designed and then properly installing it, overhead lifting devices being the load of liability that they are, but I suspect you don't want to hear that. If you happen to have a licensed mechanical engineer friend, have them sign off on the design...and be willing to pay a few bucks for that.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
Maybe two large bolts with large dia. bushings to hold it together. I'll have to think about that, but that is what I'm looking for in ideas. The beam is 6" tall X 4"
Thanks
Oh, where are you? I was looking at your bike saw mill, interesting. I've only seen one in action, round tires and the blade doesn't come off? The uncle inlaw is making a large one, someday I need to find some trees and make some cool furniture.
SW
Reply to
Sunworshipper
Yeah yeah, I know. Hey, it will be better than what was up there.
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Wow, they are pricey, A? Well, I don't like it anymore.
I hear ya, sounds like good advice except the hiring and Engineer.
I almost got killed by one way back when. Was doing diesel cranks and set one in one of the three machines and rolled the hoist out of the way a bit with the chain. Then turned back to one of the other machines for a special tool and heard chain links piling up. Ya should have seen the dent in the machine and the floor. The boss was pissed, he was SCREAMING at me " That thing has been up there since 1951 and nobody else ran it off the end before ! They didn't even drill a hole in the end and put a bolt for a stop!
SW
Reply to
Sunworshipper
To start off, I'm not really sure what you're talking about totally, so if I step on my proboscis, pardon me. I had a sweet! I beam dolly setup once. All it was consisted of a 4" i beam and a Dayton trolley. Then the hoist rolled on the I beam. Look at Dayton stuff, and probably like NorthernTools.com and see if that's what you're looking for. Good stuff, and very accurate. If you're not going to need a high safe working load, you can probably go with one of the Chinese brands. However, I suggest if you are going to push 75% of SWL, bite the bullet and get a good one. When they fail, it's usually messy. Overhead installation and support is a whole nuther thing, but no biggie for a welder/metalworker.
They DO make trolleys to match beams exactly, and there's no way you can get them off except off the ends. They are simple, and sweet.
Steve
visit my blog at
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your free book while they last. They're electronic, and the supply is endless, but they are going FAST! ;-)
Reply to
Steve B
The HF trolley I bought had pressed-in wheel axles and only shielded bearings, two of them open on one side. The cast iron wheels machined about like cheap pipe fittings. If one of the nuts holding it together wasn't tight enough or worked loose crossing uneven track joints it could fall apart. IMHO it's OK in a careful home shop but I wouldn't buy one for industrial use.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
As a side note..Ive got a near new 1 ton electric hoist on a 2 ton Ingersoll Rand powered traveler available at a very fair price....
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Also a 1 ton 110vt hoist (same page). Which while not "new" is in very very very good shape.
Gunner
I am the Sword of my Family and the Shield of my Nation. If sent, I will crush everything you have built, burn everything you love, and kill every one of you. (Hebrew quote)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Far, far away.
Before stripping it the previous owner burned big smoking circles in the street until the rear tire was down to the cords. I only had to even it up a little to get a workable amount of crown. The unworn front tire took a lot of work with a big angle grinder to flatten.
I don't remember what I finally used to check the tracking, I tried several metal straps and ways to join them.
Look at the crown on the wheels of a wood bandsaw. When the wheels are in line and the axles parallel the blade should ride up to the highest spot and stay there. Little tension is needed, the blade doesn't have to stretch.
The supplier told me to run their blades at about 5000 feet per minute:
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jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I have the small one since I use it for light metal - hundred or so.
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It has gears. I searched for 5 ton and got their 1/2 and 1 ton.
The 1/2 has gears for the motor. - It is 120v ac - and runs fast. It should be above creep moving a heavy load.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufk> >> I've been forgetting to ask if there are any great ways to design a
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
The washers are there to keep the wheels and load center - centered. You assemble it as you need and the width changes as you need. Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufk> >
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Note that the wheels on the shown trolley are tapered to match the angle of the flanges of the channel iron. Something to bear in mind when you make your own.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
We had a chain hoist chained over the beam and the other one was towards the end out of the way and not being used. The chain around the machine slipped over a rounded spot and moved maybe 1/2", thus shaking the whole set up. Then the unused one just jumped right off. I had the thing on there as tight as the wheels would go. Shitty design or maybe it isn't made to be on that kind of I-beam.
SW
Reply to
Sunworshipper
The wheel taper didn't match the channel angle very well. Perhaps it fits a larger beam better?
One 6203 bearing supports each wheel.
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jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
The wheel taper didn't match the channel angle very well. Perhaps it fits a larger beam better?
One 6203 bearing supports each wheel.
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jsw
My first choice is that I would not cut, nor would I use any trolley that has been altered. They make them for specific beams, so just buy the right one. Unless you are poor boying it, and not using it for more than 50% of SWL.
Steve
visit my blog at
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Get a free electronic book before they run out!
Reply to
Steve B
Maybe you didn't notice that I felt that way about it BEFORE modifying it. But the heaviest log in there weighed 700 Lbs green.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
The bolts through and washers adjust the wheels so they are captive.
It sounds like the person who installed it was a bit lazy or didn't read.
The load drops from the center and under the wheels. The washers set the width of the wheels and center the load loop. It sounds as if someone loosened it to get it over the beam and then just tightened it back up. Not reading the instructions or ever having them.
Mine can swing side to side - be standing to the side when you lift several hundred pound sheet of 1/2" steel and it swings towards you finding center. One hopes the 2 ton magnet holds. I should get another and a spreading bar.
Someday when more flush in cash.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufk> >
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I bought one of these years ago for half this price from Homier:
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I used it only once to align engine mounts and many times as a spreader bar to hoist appliances etc into the truck.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
If you guys are needing trollies for I-beam travelers..Ive got 4-6 sets of them here.
Probably 2 ton capacity.
Gunner
I am the Sword of my Family and the Shield of my Nation. If sent, I will crush everything you have built, burn everything you love, and kill every one of you. (Hebrew quote)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Thanks. I'll look into it. Now to buy another magnet. Ugh. money money.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufk> >> ...
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

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