Making a trolley

Gents,
I have a rather large old gen-set, which I require to make a tolley up
for. I've got two possible routes to go down, but am not sure which is
best.
Route 1: A single axle with long handles so that I can lift and turn
it. Problem: It took two men to lift the engine and frame, without the
alternator, and I cannot lift the alternator on my own! I suppose if
the axle was just to the rear of the pivot point I could lift and turn.
How steady would this set up be when the engine is running?
Route 2: A four wheeled trolley with a turning front axle. I think this
might be best, but how do I make the turntable for to front axle? Is it
as easy as a pin on the trolley, and a hole on the axle?
Can I have some suggestions please (the genset is in a frame which
measures about 5'x3' by 3' tall. Engine at one end (across frame)
driving alternator next to it by belt.).
TIA
Andy G
Reply to
andy G
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For something this heavy, you need 2 axles. A single will be highly unstable when running and moving it, especially off road. An underslung trolley would help if you really go this route. This is where the axle is cranked down to lower the load below the centre of the wheels. The bigger the wheels the better. A double axle is far preferable. The design depends on how often you intend to move it. There are turntables available but most folks seem to make their own. On the basis that a look see is better than lots of words. I suggest you tour the engine line up at your next show.
John
Reply to
John
Have a look at the trolley we made for the Ruston 1ZHR:
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If you troll through the series of pictures and pages you'll see the other parts as well as the frame.
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Prepair Ltd
I would definitely agree that anything of any weight needs at least 2 axles to be reasonably safe to move. I would reccomend not using rubber tyred wheels as iron rims make rolling a heavy object by hand much easier. I found this out the hard way when I made a trolley to carry our 350amp Lincoln bullet welder, which weighs just barely under a ton. The homemade trolley had solid rubber tyres on industrial cast iron rims, rated at 1250Kg each. The problem being that the rubber compressed very slightly under the weight of the welder to give the effect of a flat spot, making it impossible to move on a concrete floor. In fact on that trolley it only moved once, towed by a forklift, to have a genuine Lincoln one that we found in a breakers yard fitted. It's now on big roller-bearing'd steel wheels and can be easily moved with one hand. Or two if you're on softer going...
Reply to
scruffybugger
I use blanking plates for large diameter pipe fittings to make turntable discs - obtain them from Parker tools.
I agreee that two axles are necessary, but personally have found engines on iron wheels hard to move - even a small stone can halt progress. I had bettter success (but poor authenticity rating) from pneumatics.
John Ambler Sussex, UK Return E-mails to snipped-for-privacy@skiprat.net
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Reply to
John Ambler
I have long thought that a scrap front wheel hub and stub axle would make an excellent turntable, complete with taper roller bearing.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
Bit deep for a trolley, but the principle is good.
We have laser-cut 8mm blanks for turntables, I think we have some 6" or thereabouts.
Our Ruston trolley has two 14" discs with a sheet of woven teflon between them.
Pivot pin is a 30mm bolt....
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Prepair Ltd
That's almost the same size as an artic 5th wheel pin. Good British over-engineering lives on.
John
BTW, I'm as guilty as anyone.
Reply to
John
I take it that grease is not the prefered method these days then? The Ruston trolley pics are great and hopefully I will be able to get some time soon so that I can finally get it mobile.
If I could work out a way of seperating the stub axles out of grotty M Minor king pins I could mount the whole lot on good old mini wheels, then loading won't be an issue. BTW what's the material of stub axles? Will I be able to weld them?
(I have noticed a good 4 wheeled trolley on ebay, so if it stays at it's current price, I'll not have to do any of this, just get over to Brum to pick it up!)
Andy G
Reply to
andy G
I take it that grease is not the prefered method these days then? The Ruston trolley pics are great and hopefully I will be able to get some time soon so that I can finally get it mobile.
If I could work out a way of seperating the stub axles out of grotty M Minor king pins I could mount the whole lot on good old mini wheels, then loading won't be an issue. BTW what's the material of stub axles? Will I be able to weld them?
(I have noticed a good 4 wheeled trolley on ebay, so if it stays at it's current price, I'll not have to do any of this, just get over to Brum to pick it up!)
Andy G
Reply to
andy G
Teflon disc, see my other post.
Indespension used to do the stub for mini hubs, probably still available.
Ours were turned from 40mm square MS on the Raglan at work.
Way to go!
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Prepair Ltd
I have used some of Peter's blanks to make turn tables and with a piece of Nylotron in between to aid lubrication they work well.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman

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