Identify old lathe?

This one has me stumped:
The oilers on the headtock and some of the tailstock
details (the shape of the lock lever on top, and also the
cross section of the tailstock handwheel) are reminscent
of hardinge stuff. But the bed seems to be two V-ways
and hardinge never did anything like that to the best
of my knowledge.
Does this thing ring a bell for anyone?
Jim
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jim rozen
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Its neither a Harding nor an elgin. They used dovetail ways, standard or reversed, even in the tiny watchmaker lathes IRRC.
Gunner
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Reply to
Gunner
Agree, but the tailstock features are similar, especially the distinctive handwheel, where there's a solid disc instead of spokes, and a torroidal rim. Compare the two:
and
The clamp screw is also similar, although in the auction one it does seem to be entering the casting right dead center through the top. I wonder if somebody's been doing a mix/match thing.
I had a Dalton lathe where the original headstock had been replaced by a 5C cataract one.
Jim
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jim rozen
jim rozen jim snipped-for-privacy@newsguy.com
The bed and feet look very early--1880s? The large pulley step with indexing is not flipped to the left side of the steps, as was usual for instrument/watchmaker's lathes. And why the horiz slot on the tailstock? Frank Morrison
Reply to
Fdmorrison
That's right about the cone pulley being flipped around. Maybe it would be to make the underneath drive easier, the slots cut in the headstock were apparently designed to pass the leather belt, at least in two of the pulley positions.
The slot in the tailstock I would suspect is there to allow the ram to clamp up, they must be using the flex of the casting to grab the ram. I've seen these with a slot that runs out the end of the casting, never one closed-ended like that before. The fit of the ram in the casting would have to have been very precise to allow this to work.
Jim
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jim rozen

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