Industrial Gear oil ?

I got my hands on about 10 gallons of Texaco Meropa 220 Industrial gear oil
( atleast thats what the label says ).. Its smelly and brownish, so I doubt
SWMBO would appreciate me using it on the door hinges etc, so what do I use
it for ?....
Would this work on the manual gearbox in my 1997 Toyota Hiace van ?.. It has
run about 160.000 miles w. the same oil in it ( I change the oil on the
engine on a regular basis, but not on the gear box )
Or do I just burn it ?
/peter
Reply to
Q
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Don't burn it! Oil is always useful. I don't know the specification of this particular oil, but equivalent tables are available. You could try searching for the name of this oil online. Use it to fill you oil can, if nothing else. And if you really do need to get rid of it, take it to a recycling place...burning it will make a real stink!
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Don't you just love it when people get something free or cheap and then decide to risk wasting or destroying hundreds or thousands of dollars of labor or machinery (in this case, a transmission) just so they can find a use for their "bargain"?
Sure, go ahead and ignore your vehicle's service specifications (both service intervals and oil specifications). It's quite clear you know more than the collective engineering expertise of Toyota Corporation.
Now there's another great idea. It's makes much more sense to fill our air with billowing clouds of toxic black smoke than to give the oil to someone who can actually use it or to recycle it.
Reply to
DeepDiver
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MEROPA lubricants are recommended for all heavy duty enclosed gear drives containing spur gears, helical gears, and bevel gears as well as spiral bevel gears, hypoid gears, and worm gears, including those operating at high speeds or very high loads. MEROPA lubricants can also be used for chain drives, sprockets, plain and anti-friction bearings, guide ways and flexible couplings where service conditions require the use of either a mild EP or an EP-type gear lubricant. MEROPA lubricants have been formulated to meet the most severe service requirements of gear drive manufacturers. MEROPA 68 to 320 meet the US steel 224 specification and the 68 to 680 grades meet the David Brown ET 33/80 specification. MEROPA also meets DIN 51517/3 and AGMA 250.04 as well as Cincinatti Milacron P35, P59, P63, P74, P77 and P78.
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Sounds like it might also be a good chainsaw bar oil to me, probly is thicker than molasses.
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
MEROPA 68 to
The viscosity of ISO 220 is equivalent to SAE 50 engine oil or 90 weight gear oil.
Reply to
bw
Notice "guide ways"? likely make a good way lube too.
Gunner
"Considering the events of recent years, the world has a long way to go to regain its credibility and reputation with the US." unknown
Reply to
Gunner
Sae 50 motor oil and a 90 gear oil are two diferent aminals altogether.....still...
Perhaps too thin for a Bar Oil then...
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
If its clean, then add it a quart or per every couple gallons into one of your your diesel engines.
Its being a hydrocarbon fuel at the very least.
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
"PrecisionMachinisT" skrev i en meddelelse news: snipped-for-privacy@scnresearch.com...
The chainsaw bar oil recommended by Husquarna ( brand of chainsaw I own ) is way thicker than this gear oil... the the bar oil is biodegradable..
Seems its goOoooh... this stuff is perfect in your gearbox :-)
thanks for the input
I'd be happy to share the oil with you, but shipping it from Denmark might make it less attractive :-)
/peter
Reply to
Q
meddelelse
There most likely is some ISO designation on that oil you have that would verify interchangability if you were to look online hard enough for it.
Oh, and I just use the way oil that gets skimmed outa the coolant tanks for chainsaw bar oil anymore--whatever is left I give to my neighbor.....he has a waste-oil furnace that he uses to heat his shop.
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
The jug of SuperTech (Walmart brand) bar oil I have says it's SAE 30 weight. It's not all that viscous, but it's very tacky. My father-in-law buys gear oil for his chainsaw. I dunno why, it costs more than bar oil, doesn't "stick" as well, and it smells worse.
Reply to
Ron DeBlock
Does he go through a bunch of chains, too? The bar oil actually stays in long enough to lube the pins, but anything else generally gets flungeded out before it can get into the pins, so they run a bit dry and develop "chain stretch." Even gear oil--I've tried. And it did make a hellish, stinky mess.
Reply to
B.B.

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