Lathe Oil used

In a 1937 Manual it says to use SEA 10 oil. Other later places say SEA 20 oil.
Anything wrong with splitting the difference and use a SEA 10W-30 -
that I have from my domestic car days? For everything?
What is generally used these days?
How about for gears? Keystone No. 122 is written in a bunch of places. No idea what it is.
Mike
12" Atlas Model 101 27430 lathe
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I believe you mean SAE 10W oil - which happens to be Automatic Transmission fluid.
You need to get the oil that is defined. do a web search on oils.
Better yet - go down to your local oil / gas provider - e.g. Texaco - the distributor - not a gas station. The distributor will have 200 gallons of all sorts of oils. He will tap it for 1 or 5 gallons - or take it off his shelf.
Mine has many types - from Trains to Airplanes. I got 32 and 64 and ordered spindle oil from MSC - only needed a little.
The ISO and old oils are not automotive.
It does not even compare to modern engine oil of Automotive types of 10W30... Those often have chemicals in them that suspend the grit and metal shaving that grind shafts. The thin oils as defined are to lube and the grit... drops to the bottom of the tank.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
snipped-for-privacy@noplace.org wrote:

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You are correct SAE intended. They do say "S.A.E. No. 10 Motor Oil" Later "S.A.E. No. 20 Oil" No "W" for winter. Then again that was 60+ years ago. What would be used today?
Mike
On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 20:33:57 -0500, "Martin H. Eastburn"

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On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 22:40:17 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@noplace.org wrote:

Use a cheap 10w Non Detergent oil. The cheap stuff from the Autozone. Or use ATF..also the cheap stuff. The 99c a quart stuff.
Works perfectly fine. Buy the cheap stuff because thats a direct loss system..what you put in..drips out. Use Non Detergent so it brings the gunk out with it.
Gunner
"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism. As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
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If you want to bring the gunk out, you should use detergent oil.
Non-detergent allows the particulates to settle out in the bottom of the sump.
Jim
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wrote:

In my case the sump is the floor I stand on because the gears are not enclosed - I'm even missing a cover <grin>. So any grade car motor oil should be ok - such as 10W-30 that I happen to have half a case of?
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jim rozen wrote:

I have never been too concerned about the use of detergent oil on the basis of its gunk floating abilities. After all is said and done, it and the gunk it floats loose ends up in the tray under the machine. Probably a good thing!
One thing that I saw mention of, however that gave me cause to pause, was a mention of the hygroscopic function of the detergents. Not so bad when heated, at least occasionally, well beyond the temp required to drive off the moisture, as in an engine, but not so good if one hopes to find ones toys in good shape after a period apart.
Dunno about the reliability of that, but I saw it claimed.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Gunner says...

Detergent oil is hygroscopic. Coated the table on my mill with it in an unheated garage during the winter and it rusted underneath the oil. Used non-detergent, and it doesn't happen anymore. I wouldn't use it anywhere on my lathe either. Just my .02.
Garrett Fulton
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wrote:

Now this is important to know! Why use such 'oil'.
Mike
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says...

I've been using engine oil (synthetic mobil one, 0W30 wt) in my 10L spindle bearings for years. I've never seen evidence of water absorption, but then it only stays in the machine for a fairly short time.
I would never use engine oil as a rust inhibitor, for a variety of reasons.
Jim
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On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 22:40:17 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@noplace.org wrote:

In Australia we use Shell Tellus 46 it is described as a high performance anti wear hydraulic oil. meets DIN 51524 HLP, CETOP R91H cat HM, Vickers 1-286-S, M-2952-S, Denison HFO and Cincinatti Milacron P68, P69 and P70. (whatever they are)
works really well and doesnt erode the alloy components out of brass as auto engine oils do. ...oh not recommended for silver plated components.
Stealth Pilot
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For end gears I'd use Lubriplate Gear Shield. That's probably what the Keystone 122 was used for.
On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 22:40:17 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@noplace.org wrote:

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Keystone Lubricants is still in buisness, you could try contacting them at http://keystonelubricants.com/keystone/index.htm for a modern substitute.
Mike
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Take that one. Remember that at the times your lathe was built, oils were not as good as modern one. So anything within the viscosity randge will do it. Only pay attention if they speced hydraulic oil.
Nick
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