Spilled Dykem Cleanup

Being in an extremely clumsy mode last night I managed to spill about
half a pint of dykem blue on the concrete shop floor.
Wiped it up, but of course it left a nice blue stain.
Any ideas on how to clean it up? And more importantly, will it
interfere with the adhesion of epoxy paint?
TIA
Reply to
LP
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Yes, it would interfere with epoxy, but it's very easy to remove. Use acetone, and make damned sure you ventilate the room well before you do. It could prove interesting if you get too much in the atmosphere and you have any flames or sparks near by.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
"Harold and Susan Vordos" skrev i en meddelelse news:42b5255d snipped-for-privacy@newspeer2.tds.net...
Hehe... I read an article in the paper the other day about 4 boys who had been sniffing propane / butane from lighters ( the disposable ones )... After a while one of them tried to light a cigarette ( or something.. atleast he produced open flame )... Boom!... 4 kids to the hospital w. burns..
I think these kids just qualified for a Darwin Award :-)
/peter
Reply to
Q
I think you have to die or lose your reproductive ability to qualify. Something tells me those kids will have plenty of offspring.
Reply to
ATP*
I would be curious to know why a dye on the surface of the concrete would interfere with the adhesion of an epoxy.
Tanks, DOC
...
Reply to
DOC
Then let me settle that little doubt in your mind. Dyken *isn't* dye, it's paint. When you let it dry, you end up with a solid that can be scraped off. It has the potential to mix with the epoxy when applied and possibly cause it to not bond well to the concrete. . It's not worth the risk to leave it in place before painting when it can be removed so easily. When it's washed with acetone, it will dilute it to the point where the vast majority of it will come off, and the remaining amount will be well absorbed by the concrete, acting like a dye instead of paint. At that point, it's not likely to act as a release when the solvents of epoxy paint are applied.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Thanks Harold.
Not having any acetone handy I did a test area this morning with lacquer thinner and it seemed to work ok, but will obtain acetone and finish the cleanup in a few days when the current project is out of the way.
Thanks again.
Reply to
LP
Cleans off real easy with rubbing (alchohol). Cheaper and not nearly as nasty or dangerous as acetone. My usual order of trying solvents in order from harmless to nasty is: water, alchohol, mineral spirits or turpentine, lacquer thinner, acetone, naphta, xylene.
Boris
Reply to
Boris Beizer
Keywords:
I can't help with the cleanup beyond the sugestions already made. However, being subject to fits of clumsiness myself, I strongly recommend the little plastic Dykem bottles with the porous swab under the cap. They won't spill, and they don't dry up as fast. I also find it easy to get a good coating that with the little brushes in the cans.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
Dykem remover:
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Reply to
Clark Magnuson
I strongly recommend
Doug, I bought it all, and agree with you. The 2 ounce bottle for $3.39 has a .6" wide felt applicator tip.
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Reply to
Clark Magnuson
From what I understand, Dykem remover and solvent is simply acetone (or that's the primary ingredient).
Reply to
DeepDiver
Dykem is for noobs that have nothing better to do than to screw around brushing or spraying the shit on, only to have to clean it off later
It does smell GOOD though, I will grant you....
I generally will just scribe the part bare a first time (to get me into the general area), then after using a black felt pen to coat the area I will scribe it again a second time.
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
And I guess measuring twice and marking twice and not cleaning your work is what allows you to refer to yourself as a precision machinist?
Reply to
LP
Admittedly, I am also HacKjoB....
I have to earn a living in doing this shit, and in actuality I do it quite well.
USUALLY, I don't do any layout fluid at all.........just dial in the corner, let the cad-cam do the remainder.....
Rest ASSured, at one time I used to spray that layout dye shit all over the place.
And It SURE seemed like FUN at the time...
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
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Dykem, unless there's been a change in formulation, uses acetone as a solvent. You can buy a gallon of acetone from hardware stores for slightly more than the cost of one pint at your source. I'm having more than just a little trouble with that idea. Acetone works very well for cleaning surface plates, too, so having a gallon on hand is more than a good idea.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
And for those whose wives wear nail polish (fortunately, mine doesn't), it's used for removing that too! ;)
Reply to
DeepDiver
Yep!
Nail polish remover is nothing more than acetone that's buffered with some kind of oil. It works great for removing nail polish, but wouldn't be a good choice for removing Dykem from concrete----because of the oil.
My bride is like yours------sees no need for nail polish. I like women like that -------very down to earth.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Good point about the oil in nail polish remover.
In any case, I wanted to point out that very common use for those who may be concerned about the toxcity of acetone. Heck, women have been soaking their fingers and toes in the stuff for decades!
Yup. Natural beauty needs very little enhancement. :)
- Michael
Reply to
DeepDiver
So THAT explains it all. >:) >:)
Reply to
Kristian Ukkonen

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