Inspecting an anvil for purchase :::: Suggestions ?

I am going to look at an anvil to purchase. It will be my first. The seller says it is old and unmarked. What should I be looking for? How do i
determine quality? Anything to be wary of? Thanks Scott
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Look for:
Wear on the main work surface. Broken edges. Chisel marks
A "used" anvil will be slightly dished with the top face being like a shallow bowl. An "abused" anvil will more likely be flat, but will have broken edges, chisel cuts and hammer dings in the face from people hitting things cold.
A decent ring if tapped with a piece of steel will say if it is a steel anvil or cast iron anvil.
I used to used a small hammer to determine if the anvil had any "life". Life means the anvil rebounds the hammer up. A cast iron anvil with tool steel face won't have much life. It can be like pounding on a brick of lead. Sucks he life out of your arm over time.
A steel anvil will more likely rebound the hammer. It makes it a little easier to get through a long day of hammering.
Cast iron anvils usually have a fairly thick horn and heel, and a thick waist. Cast or forged steel anvils have a longer narrower horn, and heel and a narrower waist.
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Nice post Ernie. I learned some good stuff from it -- but my poor HF anvil has come into new disrepute.
Bob Swinney
wrote:

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seller
The OldTools message list deals with this every once in a while when someone realizes just how much they need an anvil and also how hard it may be to find a good one. Please look at this thread:
<http://www.frontier.iarc.uaf.edu/~cswingle/archive/get.phtml?message_id 5 92&submit_thread=1#message>
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Pointless! You really have to wonder about the intellect of the folks who post nonsense like this.
Harry C.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (ShakasCaregiver) wrote in message

Your first test should be to strike it sharpy with an large hammer and listen for it to 'ring'. If there is no notable ring, it means that it is made out of crap and not good steel. Find another candidate.
Harry C.
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Not quite true. There were a few anvils made that did not ring, but had good rebound (which is what you want with an anvil). The best way to check out if an anvil has good rebound is to take a small ball bearing and drop in to the anvil face. If you have about 75% or better rebound it will probably serve you well.             Todd
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ShakasCaregiver wrote:

Apparently a good inspection method is to drop it on a coyote.
Sorry, just had to.
--
Samiam is Scott A. Moore

Personal web site: http:/www.moorecad.com/scott
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

With or without the umbrella?
Gunner
That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or labourer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there.         - George Orwell
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That test is only good for Acme brand anvils.
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