Interesting machine



In my opinion, the saga of Bridgeport Interact CNC conversion was such a tip, lots of useful information was posted.
i
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wrote:

Yeah, ig, simply KNOWING you is an honor and a privilege.
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wrote:

insight

=======================>>>

You

think

such

A google search for "knee mill conversion" produces 4,174,000 hits, but Iggy's page is truly special...
--because "it contains lots of useful information" (most of which came from the very same RCM members whom he now seems to think ought to be overflowing with gratitude for his selfless act of philantrophy)
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What did you pay for alladat?
You can proly estimate the weight pretty well. Steel weighs 480#/cu ft, ditto copper, brass (approx), or 60# per 6" cube. You could proly visually estimate an avg "spatial density" of select measurable volumes pretty well, and come up with a grand total, good to +/- 15%.
I imagine it is going to take quite some time disassembling alladat, on top of the rigging itself.
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A lot!

I am still learning this scrap business.
My best guess is that there is 50 short tons of steel in it. (I hate short tons, but scrap yards here operate in short tons)
My another guess is that disassembly and rigging, will take 4 days.
i
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Ignoramus19014 wrote:

Since this equipment will never be put into operation as-is again, assuming it's ok with the place you're removing it from, don't be afraid to separate sections with a big abrasive cutoff saw or for tighter areas an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel. Keep a fire extinguisher nearby, but that will be the fastest way to get through mixed materials and get on with the loading. Sawzalls are good too, but an abrasive wheel will beat them for time on most materials.
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wrote:

Good suggestions. Followed of course by a Blue Point Wrench.
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This is definitely torch and chopsaw territory!
i
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On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 14:20:23 -0500, Ignoramus19014

Got yourself a nice plasma cutter yet? Might be a good job for one.
Gunner
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This is heavier stuff, cutting bolts etc. Plus it will be at the job site, not at my place.
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.
Plasma cutters can not cut very thick metal. Most plasma cutters are limited to an inch or less , but do work on stainless.
Dan
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It would not be practical to use a plasma cutter for scrapping machines. Many reasons, such as them not being as portable, needing compressed air, electricity etc, cut thickness and so on.
i
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On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 21:29:26 -0500, Ignoramus19014

Who's our resident plasma cutting expert?
Questions: How critical is it to have super dry air? Will running it from a freshly drained compressor tank hurt it? Would inline filter driers work, such as are used at the ends of spray painting air lines?
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On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 19:26:51 -0700 (PDT), the renowned

How about one of those oxygen lance things?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yJmYl9d-XI

Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 19:26:51 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

"Most"?
Many can do up to 1.5" in Burn/Gouge mode.
Thats in Single Pass. You can burn that same amount in the second pass..and in the third....
My Miller 2050 is rated at 3/4"
Ive cut 2" steel with it.
Gunner
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You did note that plasma cutter requires three phase power, oxygen , and Argon. Not exactly what I would call a portable machine.
Dan
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..

If you read what I wrote , you will see I referred to the plasma cutter that you posted a link to. The hypertherm Maxpro 200. It requires both Argon and Oxygen and runs on three phase power. In addition it weighs 740 lbs., but that probably does not include the Oxygen and Argon bottles.
Do you own a plasma cutter? Have you used one? Have you seen one being used in a scrap yard?
Dan
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Yeah, what a great idea. [not]
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I am somewhat familiar with plasma cutters. They are great especially for some things. But Plasma cutters work by converting electrical energy to heat gas to a high temperature . The hot gas melts the metal and the melted metal is blown away by the hot gas. So they are somewhat limited by how much electrical energy they consume. The older model use nitrogen for the gas. Later models use dry air. Moisture plays hell with the consumables. The Hypertherm model you referenced is the first one I have seen that uses both oxygen and an inert gas. So some of the energy comes from the oxygen burning the metal instead of all the energy coming from electricity. Smart idea. But I expect that the oxygen does not help much with stainless.

Plasma cutters may be used in some scrap yards but I doubt if very many scrap yards use plasma cutters. I am personally acquainted with only two scrap yards, And neither of them uses plasma cutters. I am also familiar with a company called Net Systems that makes trawls and trawl doors. They have a nice cnc cutting set up. But it does not use a plasma cutter. It uses oxy acet.. I have also toured two steel mills. One in near Sidney and the other in West Seattle. Both of them do continuous thin slab casting. Both of them use oxy acet for cutting the slab.

I was just giving you an opening to show your credentials as a expert on plasma cutters. So actually owning and using a plasma cutter would establish you as having practical experience. I have used a plasma cutter, but do not own one. But I do own a welder or two and have an arc air torch.
Dan
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Quite possible. But the physics has not changed.
Dan
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