Lead Burning plates inside old lead acid cells

I have read quite a bit about lead burning, but it does not seem appropriat e for my requirement.
From a previous life in the Middle East I inherited about 100 lead acid cel
ls. I emptied the acid out, washed them thoroughly with distilled water, th en dried them in the sun, - there was lots of it! I sealed the tops and shi pped them all back to UK. From time to time I have resurrected a few to mak e up 12 volt batteries and full of sulphuric acid they performed OK and las ted a reasonable time.
A few years ago I was looking at connecting a lot together to run a more po werful inverter. but it has become more and more difficult to get sulphuric acid, health and safety don't you know.
I discovered that the electrolyte could be change to a saturated solution o f Alum (aluminium Sulphate) which is pretty docile compared to the acid an d works as well. I got a bank working OK but soon noticed a few cells were getting a very high internal resistance and finally found that the positive cells were kind of corroded so as to break off and the junction of the pos . post and the bar holding the plates.
This was nothing to do with the electrolyte as even the ones full of acid w ere the same and fresh ones from my old stock showed a very weak join on th e same place. I can only assume that the age of these cells has caused the internal corrosion in this area and it is only the Pos. plates which are af fected, the negative ones are like new and very strongly connected.
I tried my hand at soldering then together, but failed miserably and tried to clamp the fracture together in one cell but the resistance of the clampe d break, which I filed to give a clean metal to metal joint is very high an d so the discharge current is tiny compared with a good cell.
So how do you weld lead stopping it all from falling into a molten mess?
The lead sections to be re-joined are quite thick at about a quarter of an inch, but it may need to be set up in a kind of jig, or mould, to allow the lead to flow without it all melting at once.
Has anyone any ideas of how I might recover so many cells without giving up the rest of my life to the task?
Thanks for any thoughts. Oh yes I have just installed a 40 Kw 3 phase gene rator in my workshop but it is far too noisy and also I don't really need s o much horsepower It is driven by an air cooled Lister 4 cylinder diesel. I don't suppose anyone would like to swap this for a 15-20 Kw QUIET set I li ve in Norfolk and it is a bit heavy too, but I can lift it with my old JCB. I also have a couple of 30 Hp motors for sale or swap and a strange 400 c/ s or rather Hertz Yes that is not a misprint it is 3 phase 415 volts and wa s part of a frequency converter and was driven in line by the motor above. Made to computer standards by Maudsley. I can send details and photos to a nyone interested, I think there are already some on my website which is Ma ribel Eco Systems dot Co dot UK. in the old engines section the title has n o spaces by the way, no caps either.
Regards George.
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On Wed, 22 Mar 2017 07:21:53 -0700 (PDT), George

Years ago I went to a welding class and the instructor was an older chap that had been welding since the days of gas welding only. He recounted his experiences lead burning the walls of an x-ray room. From his description he used a gas torch.
It was a long time ago but my recollection was that it must have been much like gas welding aluminum.
Or you could watch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nm0o1g4ejys
or
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzBK7S8cCGU

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    [ ... positive terminals/plates disconnecting ... ]

    I fear that I can't answer this. Proably as a start, a channel which fits the bars closely and is of a material which is not likely to bond to the lead might help. Perhaps a ceramic.
    [ ... ]

    400 Hz (or in old terminology, cycles per second, was commonly used in two places. One, apparently is where yours was used -- power distribution for mainframe computers. It allowed physically smaller local power supplies to be distributed through the system.
    The other, and where I am more familiar with it, is for electronics in aircraft. 400 Hz transformers are a lot lighter than 60 Hz ones capable of transmitting the same power, so almost everything in aircraft (military and larger civilian at least) is made to run from 400 Hz. And it is typically 115 V three phase to drive the rotors in gyroscopes for inertial navigation systems, and to make sure that they rotate they right direction. I have a rotary converter which takes in 28 VDC at perhaps 20 Amps or more, and produces the 115 V 400 Hz 3 phase. It also produces more audio noise than I like. :-)
    I'm experimenting with instruments (some of which are normally driven from the inertial navigation system mentioned above), but the instruments only need single phase 115 VAC for internal power, and signals from synchros (also called Selsyns) which are sort of three phase, but not really at power levels. The actual phase relationship of the three leads, and the relative voltages, carry angular information.
    I've recently gotten the necessary parts to drive a Variac (variable autotransformer) made for 400 Hz with 20 VAC out of an audio power amplifier, and boost it to the needed voltages -- 120 VAC from another tap on the winding, and 26 VAC from the wiper.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

You need an R-2800 to mask the converter's noise.
-jsw
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wrote:

http://www.enginehistory.org/gwhitecol.shtml
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On Thu, 23 Mar 2017 08:55:14 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Like this?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iu2yYoIpEJc



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH4OtjCSCbU
Nice!
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    I guess that it would -- but is a bit out of my budget, and probably the town would not let me run it very long. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

The operating cost for some of those old warbirds works out to around a dollar per second.
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wrote:

I loved the sound of those A-1 Skyraiders at NKP!
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On Thu, 23 Mar 2017 19:05:00 -0400, "Phil Kangas"

Dad was a crop duster (in addition to rice, cows, and making levee rollers). We ran R-985's on Super Ag Cats back then. I can still remember the sounds of one catching and firing up. He'd often have me or my brother run one at 1000 rpm to warm up, sitting with our feet on the brakes. Especially after the brake lock failed on one and it rolled forward until the prop hit a full oil drum. It threw that drum about 50 yards, cut almost in two with big spiral slices. It made quite a mess.
Pete Keillor
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wrote:

http://www.avialogs.com/en/engines/usa/pratt-whitney/r-985/navweps-02a-10ab-2-technical-manual-service-instruction-r-985-an-1-3-14b-39-39a-aircraft-engines.html
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On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 10:41:38 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Whew! What'd the replacement prop blades cost?

Wow, with a 5x5" bore/stroke, she's not a petite engine.
Those 35 specialty tools used on those are likely -expensive- dinosaur teeth, wot? I think I'll DL and read that entire manual for kicks.
It's too bad I graduated from high school directly into alcoholism. Being an Air Force brat, I loved flying and would have chosen an aviation tech school and become an aircraft mechanic and pilot rather than an auto mechanic, but I didn't want to join the military, either. July 10th, I'll be 32 years sober, Crom willing.
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On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 10:41:38 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Thanks, I'll download that. I've seen a running 1/5 scale model. I don't know if it had the supercharger.
Pete
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wrote:

Way down on my to-do list: http://www.agelessengines.com/9cyl.htm http://www.5bears.com/observe.htm -jsw
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On Sat, 25 Mar 2017 09:06:45 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Fantastic! I used to have (lost in a move) plans for a 1/5 scale A-26. I initially got into machining from 1. workplace envy (I designed stuff, the shop got to build) and 2. the desire, unrealistic though it might be, to power that model with actual radials. If not 18 cyl (your R-2800), then at least 9.
Way down on the list is a good description.
Pete
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wrote:

It was a small fraction of my excuse to buy this 6-jaw chuck: http://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID"76&category Yesterday I tapped broom threads (Amazon.com product link shortened) in 1/2" plastic electrical conduit to make a tool that fits on a painting extension pole. Neither a 3-jaw nor that 6-jaw would grip well enough to resist the tapping torque and I had to use a 27/32" collet. My main excuse to buy the 6-jaw was to chuck tubing larger than 5C collet size.
That chuck has a gap in its gripping range. It doesn't open much beyond 1" before the jaws slip off the scroll and the minimum ID it will fit is 1.310"
The tapped hole was too small to screw on by hand until I heat-softened the PVC. Threads in oak fit better so the plastic must have deformed. -jsw
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On Sun, 26 Mar 2017 07:04:09 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

I did something similar, only I single pointed it in aluminum. Cut it upside down to have the bit leaving the hole. I had to modify the acme profile some to get the handle to spin in. It was for an adapter to allow me to get the engine flush bracket onto my outboard while hanging over the transom (it was in a marina on a lift at the time).
http://www.mwdropbox.com/dropbox/FlushKitClamp10.jpg
Beat cracking the cartilage in my ribs, which I did twice before making it.
That tap would have been handy.
Pete
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wrote:

Nice work!
The cutting edge on the broom tap is about as sharply raked as a wood chisel so I decided not to risk it on metal.
The cast zinc male threaded end on the extension pole didn't stand up to the tasks I gave it and broke off. I turned an aluminum replacement and shifted the more strenuous jobs to an unthreaded pool cleaning extension pole, which has stood up to the stresses of scooping the gutters and raking crusted snow off the roof.
The secret to scooping the gutters from the ground was making mounting brackets that didn't interfere. -jsw
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On Sun, 26 Mar 2017 10:09:34 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Why do you want to do it from inside the boat? On friends' boats, they/we always put the flusher on the outboard (or I/O) from the ground, then turned the water on, then started the engine for a minute.

Ouch! Didn't learn the first time, wot? BTDT. <sigh>

They're nice. The threadboxes are great, too.

Yabbut, no serrations in the elbow?
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Hirth_Verzahnungsringe.JPG

Bummer.

Those were major adjustments to your method. C'est la vie.

For the gutter itself, or the scoop end?
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wrote:

For both. It seems better to angle the scoop about 45 degrees to push the leaf debris along to pile up and spill over the edge, instead of trying to scoop it up directly. I left off the end caps at the downspout tees to let the scoop push the debris straight out. A piece of gutter runs straight through the downspout tee, a center cutout lets the water drop but doesn't snag the scoop.
Fortunately I guessed right the first time on the stiffness of the gutter hangers and didn't have to replace them or add more in between. -jsw
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