Lead Burning plates inside old lead acid cells

On Sun, 26 Mar 2017 13:21:04 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"


Nice.

Cool.
With only one tree to contend with, an 80' Sequoia sempervirens (15' from the house <sigh>) my tool is a golf-club style scythe
http://www.s200643392.onlinehome.us/img/6287262.jpg and the water hose with a pistol grip and brass concentrator screwed onto the end. My roof is 4:12 and easy to walk on. I wrapped about 10 layers of masking tape on the scythe blade so it doesn't scratch the paint, then push and lift the debris out as it builds up, spraying the remains down the open-ended downspouts at each end, a 1/2 hour job twice a year.
I picked up a curved wand attachment http://tinyurl.com/n2dknyt for my PW and will try that the next time I break out the PW, using the large nozzle to lower the pressure and mess.
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wrote:

I bought this telescoping spray nozzle to wash the road salt from under the car (Amazon.com product link shortened) and then thought it might help with the gutters.
The extension tube I made is 1/2" EMT adapted to garden hose thread with a standard watertight fitting on one end. I bored a male hose-to-NPT fitting to slide over the EMT and attach the sprayer to the other end.
The outer tube slides over the EMT and a rubber hose washer seals the joint and holds the sprayer in place.
It does work, however I can't see how well from the ground and rinsing the gutter with town water to reduce the debris in my rain barrel counters the purpose of the rain barrel. A filter of landscaping fabric over 1/4" hardware cloth is more effective. -jsw
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On Mon, 27 Mar 2017 07:39:18 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Man, talk about _obvious_ Photoshopping on the outlet stream from that thing in those pictures. I'm sure, having used it, you'll agree. <g> Does debris not get stuck at the support spikes? It does with a regular hose and my brass concentrator/sweeper nozzle, which is why I "shovel" first with the scythe and then wash. I thought the PW att. would solve that easily.

Nice, and just the length you need.

I have an extra water barrel diverter from my sister, so I'll have to think about that extra filtering, too. I installed her diverter and two barrels in one spot, next to her garden, and drilled a 3/4" hole for a connector tube between them, allowing the one diverter to fill both barrels.
Maybe I can just put the LS cloth over my existing light-bulb shaped hardware cloth filter for that downspout...
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wrote:

What support spikes? My custom hangers wrap around underneath and don't obstruct the top at all. The joint and downspout fittings are screwed to the house, which is enough to prevent the gutter sections from blowing away.

I dished the screen that covers the $12 trashcan water barrels up around the edges and down in the center like a volcano crater. The downspout ends in an accordion section that can be made to stay in place over the center or pulled straight down for the winter. The LS cloth keeps out mosquitos.
Hardware cloth is easy to sculpt freehand, or into smooth curves by pushing it into the mouth of a metal trashcan or bucket. Sheetmetal Vise-Grips can fold over the sharp cut edge.
How did you seal the connector tube? My method of making bulkhead fittings from hose repair ends may not be reliable.
-jsw
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On Mon, 27 Mar 2017 13:04:44 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Well, ain't you fancy? That makes is much quicker and easier if the amount of debris doesn't clog on the roofing. My sheathing hangs over the fascia by 1/2" and the roofing/tarpaper 3/4" more, so my opening is narrower, plus the spikes. That's why I like the little scythe, which is narrow enough to allow bending of the sequoia droppings, with their little 3/4x1" cones on the end, as I scoop it out. Even a narrow trowel got caught up.

Good point. My sister doesn't have them in NorCal, but we do up here. Do you have to take in the barrels for the winter, for fear of freezing, or empty them?

Needle nosed vise-grips work well, too.

I was going to use ShoeGoo (it adheres to damnear everything) but she didn't have any. She told me not to worry about it since it was a fairly snug plastic-plastic fit. Her plastic barrels were narrow and tapered, like a Reeky Ricardo tall bongo drum, so she loses maybe 4 gallons by not storing to the top. I don't think I'd follow the directions to the letter any more, and put any connectors I install farther toward the top of the drum. This looks like a fairly good deal for long-term: http://tinyurl.com/mx3z86m or http://tinyurl.com/lw4b29x And a spigot: http://tinyurl.com/kdtg9cc
Or a combo which might prevent skeeters: http://tinyurl.com/lfga854
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wrote:

In winter they store wood splints from the log splitter, for kindling. I don't know if these Rubbermaid trash cans would survive freezing. Open-topped oil drums freeze last at the ground end so the core of water pushes the bottom into a dome.
I've forgotten to empty the garden sprayers I modified into fire extinguishers but freezing didn't hurt them (so far).

Thanks. Lowes wants too much for similar plastic bulkhead fittings and mine flex from pull on the hose. They are replacement hose end fittings with the barb threaded for a locknut. -jsw
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On Tue, 28 Mar 2017 11:05:33 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

I had one burst one year. Ditto my drip irrigation timer when I forgot it. It was 4F for 4 days one year and my house water pipe froze (but didn't burst, thank Crom) and ice blew the timer to bits when it expanded. My furnace drain froze up that year, too, so I insulated the external portion of the pipe. Thankfully, it hasn't frozen again. That was a cold couple of days. As the furnace got less and less efficient, it was down to running for only a minute or two at a time and the interior of the house got down to 50F.

Here's a lead-free spigot: http://tinyurl.com/k5ouarr 4gpm @ 2' water height. They also make a 14gpm in leaded. I'm disgusted by the tiny orifices most of this stuff has nowadays. I got lucky with a spigot for my water crock, which has a nice, fast water flow.

I noticed, belatedly, that those aren't lead-free fittings. OK for a flower bed, but I'd rather not use 'em for the garden.
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On Sun, 26 Mar 2017 09:30:39 -0700, Larry Jaques

There was no ground. The boat went from lift into the water, then upon return, straight back onto the lift hanging over the water.

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On Mon, 27 Mar 2017 05:45:50 -0500, Pete Keillor

Crikey, how did I miss that "marina" phrase? <sigh> Mea culpa.
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    [ ... ]

    No reversed jaws? Ideally, two-piece jaws so you can reverse the top jaws while keeping the scroll engaged.
    O.K. A 4" chuck, and they explicitly say the outside jaws are not included -- but I see them as nice to have for some tubing sizes anyway.
    My usual chuck is a 6-1/4" Bison with two-piece jaws. I do have a 6" 6-jaw, and I also don't have the outside jaws, and *want* them. :-)

    Stretched during the tapping, and shrunk back a bit afterwards.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

Since I have a larger 4-jaw, Bob Cumings at NE Brass and Tool talked me into a 5" Bison 3-jaw Set-Tru for my 10" South Bend, because the carriage can pass under it to put the tool post on the left side (or maybe to get rid of an oddball size that didn't sell?)
I keep left-side cutting pressure from sliding the work off the jaws with a sleeve of pipe and a live pipe center. When hand tapping or reaming large holes having the carriage completely out of the way has been very convenient and probably safer.
-jsw
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On Sat, 25 Mar 2017 07:40:50 -0500, Pete Keillor

The full sized '985 had a gear driven centrifugal supercharger as did many radial engines. Perhaps more to ensure even fuel distribution to the radial cylinders than to generate more power. If the 1/5th scale model didn't then it's lower cylinders likely ran rich while the upper cylinders ran lean :-)
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wrote:

It was probably in there. He even had a miniature of the PW emblem on the oil sump between the bottom two cylinders.
Pete Keillor
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On Friday, March 24, 2017 at 8:12:12 AM UTC-4, Pete Keillor wrote:

If you really want to hear the round engines talk, you need to be in the co ckpit of a DC-6A on a cold day in AL. Doing engine runs after a few jug cha nges. The procedure after breakin was to take all 4 to max. takeoff power d ry, and then throw all 4 water/meth ganged switches on the eyebrow panel. F irst time I witnessed it, it was a schock. It was rocking in the chocks and the whole aircraft shuddered. What mechanical music that was. P&W wrote th e book on radials with the 2800. When I went to Boeing 767 school in Seattl e, the instructors had deep respect for P&W. Called them the Pratt Iron Wo rks in deference to their tough engines. My son is a PhD aerospace enginee r and works for Pratt now designing mil. engines. And that's metalworking c ontent.
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