Lincoln Welder electrical questions

Hi Guys,
Two Welders: Welder 1: Weld-pak100. Is there any way to convert this to 220v? They make a similar 220 version a
nd I am wondering if it is just a wiring thing to the transformer. The wiri ng diagram -- Page 47, http://www.lincolnelectric.com/assets/servicenavigator-public/lincoln3/imt4 60.pdf
This shows three H2 connections. Is the 220v version just wired with a diff erent plug and cable using the third H2? If so, can someone please give me an amended diagram on how to do this to reduce Amp draw.
Welder 2: Power MIG 255 When I bought this many years back the weld-shop guy gave me a stubby exten sion cable that plugs the welder to a dryer outlet. I have used the welder for 10+ years in an outlying shed at a hobby level and never had an issue p opping dual-20A breakers.
For reasons yet to be understood, yesterday I got to reading the bac k panel and it stated 50A-Outlet. Holy shit Batman! But nothing even gets w arm at the outlet or the wires leading to it.
I set it up with a clamp meter on one wire and my phone recording video of the meter and it peaked for about 1/4-second at 23.7A. But it mostly stayed around the 20A - 22A marks. Obviously that was not enough to trip the brea kers under intermittent load, thus never having had a problem.
Now if you are about to jump on me about burning the shed down then go warn someone else, I don't really give a fuck. Over the years, I have put throu gh probably 5 large reels of wire and nary a popped breaker. I put in two n ew 20A breakers yesterday just in case and they never popped either.
Now here's the question, should I really run three 250-feet lengths of 25A- rated (or whatever) wire from the house panel just to be sure --or-- not bo ther until I pop the breakers -- if ever?
Helpful thoughts other than mindless cautionary trolling? :)
Might just mention awesome welder, makes me look better at it than I really am.
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On Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 11:11:41 AM UTC-4, Dave, I can't do that wrote :

ack panel and it stated 50A-Outlet. Holy shit Batman! But nothing even gets warm at the outlet or the wires leading to it.

f the meter and it peaked for about 1/4-second at 23.7A. But it mostly stay ed around the 20A - 22A marks. Obviously that was not enough to trip the br eakers under intermittent load, thus never having had a pr>

and I am wondering if it is just a wiring thing to the transformer. The wi ring diagram -- Page 47,

A-rated (or whatever) wire from the house panel just to be sure --or-- not bother until I pop the breakers -- if ever?

ly am.
The wiring diagram only shows two connections for the power coming in. Tha t pretty much says the only way to convert it to 220 is to replace the tra nsformer or sell the welder and buy one that is 220 v input.
Lincoln would be advertising it as being good on 120 and 220 if it were.
Some where in the electrical code is a paragraph that says that welders can be used on circuits that are not rated for as much current as the welder u ses at full output. I don't have a copy of the electric code so can't quot e the exact verbiage \ Dan.
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    [ ... ]

    And -- if a new transformer, you would also need a third tap ont he transformer, so it could drop the 240 VAC to 120 VAC for the fan and the gas solenoid, both of which are rated at 120 VAC.
    You would also need a step-down transformer for the feeds to the control PC board, too, to keep from frying it.

    So -- if you don't use full output current, you can get away with lower input current. The real clue that you need more input current is if you trip the circuit breaker. :-)

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On 5/24/2018 10:11 AM, Dave, I can't do that wrote:

would . Best thing you can do is be sure if you use an extension cord that it's heavy enough - 12ga preferred . BTW , is yours set up for
see any reason the change anything . If you start doing heavier welding and it starts popping the breaker , then it's time to upgrade .
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On 5/24/2018 8:11 AM, Dave, I can't do that wrote:

Break out your meter:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/AC-WORKS-AC-Connectors-100-ft-10-3-Heavy-Duty-SOOW-L5-30-30-Amp-125-Volt-Generator-Rubber-Extension-Cord-L530PR-100/303426691
Very likely a 30 AMP 120V outlet.
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Unless you got a 120/240 transformer and ran the control and gas solenoid off the centertap like any intelligent manufacturer would. Qwuitr possibly the control board and gas valve are already running off 12 or 24 volts anyway.

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