Running Lincoln Single Phase 220V welder from generator

I have a lincoln Mig welder requiring 230V 20A single phase power. I
have a welding job to do where there is no power available. It has the
Nema 6-50P 3 prong style plug.
I have a coleman 5000W run / 6250W max generator that has a 120/240 20A
4 prong twist lock style receptacle Nema style L14-20R.
Is this 4 prong receptacle 3 phase power? I purchased a 6-50 3 prong
receptacle, and L14-20 plug hoping to make some sort of adapter cable
so I could use my welder with the generator.
Is this possible with what I have? Can I just pull single phase 220
power from the X and Y out of the 4 prong plug (leaving the W
disconnected)? If not, is there a generator that has a 220V single
phase receptacle on it?
Thanks.
Reply to
Terry
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Not likely. It is probably two hots, neutral and ground. 14-20R is for single phase. If this is the kind of coleman that's sold at home depot, it is very unlikely to provide 3 phase.
What I would do in your situation is I would buy 12 gauge power cable, a 14-20 plug (which you seem to have already), properly connect the wire to the plug and then directly to your welder.
Be careful, as you apparently do not quite see all issues involved. A mistake can get you killed very easily. For example, if you are welding an object that has contact with ground, contact one hot leg to the object by mistake, and another hot leg to the frame of the generator, you will get killed if you touch both objects or anything directly connected to it (for example if you directly connect your welder to the object). Make sure that the voltage is 220V where it should be and 0 where it should not. If you have any doubts or do not have a voltmeter, do not undertake this project or ask someone's assistance.
Your welder seems to need max power somewhat beyond the power range of these crap generators, which are overrated to begin with. So, operate well within power limits allowed by your genset.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19023
Very unlikely. That should be essentially the same as a 240 V home power panel. 240 V with a neutral, so you have two 120 V circuits and one 240 V circuit. The 4th prong is safety ground. I purchased a 6-50 3 prong
I'm not clear on the X Y W wiring. You should use a meter to verify which terminals are the 240 V before wiring up the adaptor. The safety ground should be pretty obvious, but on the twist lock it is the prong with the flange.
This welder may be at the upper limit of the generator, and will probably cause the engine to surge and dip a bit as the arc sputters. If you are not maxing out the welder, it should work fine.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
| I have a lincoln Mig welder requiring 230V 20A single phase power. I | have a welding job to do where there is no power available. It has the | Nema 6-50P 3 prong style plug. | | I have a coleman 5000W run / 6250W max generator that has a 120/240 20A | 4 prong twist lock style receptacle Nema style L14-20R. | | Is this 4 prong receptacle 3 phase power? I purchased a 6-50 3 prong | receptacle, and L14-20 plug hoping to make some sort of adapter cable | so I could use my welder with the generator.
Not three phase. Two 110 lines (between them 220V,) a neutral, and a ground. L14-20 is a 125/250V 20A 3 pole (two hot legs and a neutral) 4 wire grounding outlet, so check your breaker to see what the working rating is. 220V*20A is 4400 watts, so I think you'll be okay, just don't keep the duty cycle high or you could overheat your generator. Visit an RV shop to see if they have adapters right out of the box, or they might be able to put together a pigtail for you. You do want to keep the ground and neutral wired properly on through to the welder, since it's a safety thing. The adapter or pigtail will do that.
| Is this possible with what I have? Can I just pull single phase 220 | power from the X and Y out of the 4 prong plug (leaving the W | disconnected)? If not, is there a generator that has a 220V single | phase receptacle on it? | | Thanks. |
Reply to
carl mciver
Thanks for the quick response. I am pretty familiar with electrical wiring, but this generator is a loaner and I have never used this type of receptacle before. And yes, I believe it was purchased from Home Depot!
The 4 prong plug is labeled X, Y, W, and G. So using my volt meter, I expect to measure 220V between the X and Y, and 110V between X and G or Y and G. (I'll do this in the morning)
My 3 prong receptacle is labeled X, Y, and G. So If everything measured properly, I should be able to just hook up my power wire to X, Y, and G on both sides. Then plug one end into the generator, the other into my welder and make sure I keep the current low. Though using the published numbers, my welder takes 230V @ 20A which equals 4600W. The generator says it is capable of 5000W continuous and 6250W peak. But I won't be pushing the welder at full power, maybe half power.
Ignoramus19023 wrote:
Not quite sure how I would connect one hot leg to the object I am welding and another hot leg to the frame of the generator by mistake. Do you mean if I wire the adapter cable incorrectly so for example a hot wire is going to the ground of the welder, and then I clamp my ground cable (which could potentially be hot) to the object I am welding?
I'm hoping that if I just wire the cable correctly as mentioned above, then I should be able to use the welder as I normally do. Though if I am overlooking something I need to be careful about, please explain again.
you will get killed if you touch both objects or anything
Thanks.
Reply to
Terry
The 6-50 plug has two hots and a ground. So I get 110 between either of the hots and ground, and 220 between the two hots.
I haven't measured what the L14-20 conector puts out yet, but it should be pretty much the same, but I have this extra neutral wire. Not quite sure where to hook this up. I don't know if it would be a good idea to leave it unconnected. If there is no power comming on the neutral line (which their shouldn't be right?) I could connect it directly to ground. Any comments on this?
Thanks.
Reply to
Terry
Yes, check it out.
That makes good sense.
Yep.
No, all I am saying is, be very careful and double check your work. A mistake can get you, or some kids nearby, killed.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus4205
I'm wiring up the pigtail right now and just wondering if anyone has any comments on how to hook up the neutral wire. It does say on the generator that the neutral is floating. As I mentioned before, the only place I can possibly think of is connecting it to ground.
I just want to make sure I do it right.
Thanks.
Reply to
Terry
| I'm wiring up the pigtail right now and just wondering if anyone has | any comments on how to hook up the neutral wire. It does say on the | generator that the neutral is floating. As I mentioned before, the | only place I can possibly think of is connecting it to ground. | | I just want to make sure I do it right. | | Thanks.
Inside the circuit breaker panel of your home you will find the white neutral and the green ground wires all terminating at the same point. On the face of it, it doesn't make sense, but this is the thinking: The old style three wire 220V circuits had no ground, just a neutral. That means if you lose your neutral, you are at risk of a painful nibbling. If you lose your neutral on a four wire circuit, the appliance body is still grounded (three wire appliances are not) so you are still protected, and if such a failure happens to be a short, the ground wire will route the current back to the box where the breaker will pop, reducing your hazard drastically. Now, I will admit I'm not exactly sure how to wire up the neutral and grounds on a welder like yours. If the neutral "floats" then that means it isn't tied to ground inside the generator, it comes right off of the windings. I'd consult both user manuals for both appliances and go from there, but there is a risk if your welding project's ground and the welder case grounds get together, an unwelcome ground current will come to be, so I'm inclined to think that the ground is less important than the neutral. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong here! I do know that when your generator is used to provide power to your home, the neutral and ground come together in the breaker panel, which is important as there must always be just _one_ point where they come together, and the breaker panel is that place. To have them come together elsewhere sets up unwanted ground leg currents, which are evil, and devices such as GFI's are designed to interrupt.
Reply to
carl mciver
if you only need 220V for the welder, no neutral hookup, you do not need a neutral. Just wrap it in electrical tape very well. I would not ground it.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus4205
Thanks for all the help. I ended up wiring the neutral wire to ground and all worked well. I was able to do the whole job without having any issues.
Thanks again.
Reply to
Terry

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