Link-belt substitution

I purchased a forklift where the drive belt turning the water pump and alternator, is torn/broke and not functional. I knew this when I was
buying.
A replacement belt is about $7 at McMaster Carr (item 7881K35). HOWEVER, it cannot be easily replaced because the drive shaft is in the way.
So, I looked towards link belts that can be put through and then joined. Example is mcMaster item 6173K36, Twist Lock Adjustable-Length V-Belting 3L Belt Type, 3/8" Belt Width. They say that it can transmit the same horsepower. It is more expensive, but seems easier to put on, as opposed to removing the U-joint at the bottom of the forklift.
Would you say that I can use that link-belt without any issues? Any pitfalls to be aware of?
i
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Ignoramus2551 wrote:

A lot of people use those on small lathes and mills . Never heard of one that busted from overload ... if they say it'll transmit that much power , it'll prolly do twice that . Called "CYOA" .
--
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wrote:
SNIP

I have two friends who swear by these belts. Only "bad" comment is that shortly after intallation and running they "stretch" quite a bit and need to have to have a link or two removed, but then they are good "forever".
Brian Lawson.
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"Brian Lawson" wrote in message
wrote:
SNIP

I have two friends who swear by these belts. Only "bad" comment is that shortly after intallation and running they "stretch" quite a bit and need to have to have a link or two removed, but then they are good "forever".
Brian Lawson. ___________________________________________
Exactly!
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Ig, I've not installed them myself, but have had them on equipment I bought, where they'd already been installed as replacements. They seem completely reliable. I don't know about their life vs. a standard continuous belt.
I think if you get one rated for the same load and form-factor, they'd not be smart to advertise it as working in that service unless it did. They've been around for a LONG time.
LLoyd
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On 2012-03-09, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

That's good to know. I will install one tomorrow, hopefully.
i
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On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 16:06:46 -0600, Ignoramus2551

Iggy, I can't remember what you got for a forklift. Does this drive shaft drive the hydraulic pump? If it does and you plan on keeping this machine then it would be worth the effort on your part to break down the drive shaft. Most of them are splined on both ends and sometime don't have a grease fitting or if they do they haven't been greased in a while. The u-joints should also be checked. It can get epensive if that shaft lets go.
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It is a Hyster 5,000 lbs forklift.

I think so, however, the belt in question does not drive anything heavy.

You are suggesting to do it as another maintenance item, right?
i
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On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 19:22:39 -0600, Ignoramus2551

Your right. The belt is drive off the crankshaft and feeds the fan, water pump and alternator. That link belt will work.

Yes. reach down to that shaft and see if you have much play, If so you may want to have a closer look at it. I can replace that belt in under 1/2 hour but I have done a few. If it has been maintained, removal of four bolt on the flange nearest the u-joint, push the shaft away from the crankshaft towards the pump, replace the belt and reassemble. If the splines haven't been greased then its another ballgame as the shaft won't slide to get the belt out. If the u-joints are worn they will vibrate and there is a possibility of taking out the hydo pump. Now ya get to pull the counterweight of the unit to access the pump.
whats the first four digits of your serial # possibly C138 I will look up to see what your what your working on.
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Jeff, I will get that info tomorrow. This is a Hyster 5K forklift with 8000 hours and a weird pedal with forward/reverse on the pedal itself. I do not like this approach to choosing forward or reverse.
The good news is that it starts and runs and can even drive itself onto my tilt trailer.
i
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On Thu, 08 Mar 2012 21:35:24 -0600, Ignoramus2551

Thats called a monotrol pedal designed by Hyster..... they are popular but take a while to get used to. I never got used to them

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John Deere hydrostatic "Estate Mowers" all have that sort of control, too.
Really... it takes about an hour of actual maneuvering (as opposed to just going in a straight line) to get used to.
LLoyd
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On 2012-03-10, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

I do not like it because I feel that it is unsafe.
i
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It really isn't, Ig. The pedal is spring-centered. It's just another trained muscle skill.
Some folks consider the "crash bar" controls in BobCat brand loaders to be unsafe -- and they can be, because of their tendency to allow "PIO" (pilot-induced oscillations). But a skilled operator can make a BobCat sing.
I prefer the ASV joystick control, myself. To me, it's like a second set of arms.
But I've spent a good many hours with the Deere pedal control, and can tell you that it quickly becomes natural and safe to use.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

The key I've found to the Bobcat pedals is to push your foot against the pedal and rock it. When folks try to just press the top or bottom of the pedal they get the oscillations and almost no control. I expect the forklift is similar and I expect it's a lot more efficient than having to take a hand of the lift controls to switch gears.
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I have used them on a couple of light machines. The industry standard is Power Twist from Fenner: http://www.fennerdrives.com/default.aspx
I suspect that is what McMaster sells, although sometimes it's hard to tell. I've had three pretty minor issues:
1) They settle in, and you may need to remove a link after a bit.
2) They make a zipping noise when new, which can be annoying on an otherwise quiet machine (I took them off my small mill for that reason).
3) While they wear in, they leave red dust behind.
Advantages:
1) Easier to install in some cases (like yours)
2) More flexible. My biggest success was with a horizontal band saw. It would buck every time a stiff spot on a conventional belt came around. Even a new belt ran uneven. The Fenner belt fixed it fast.
3) They will never get stiff.
The wear out will phase be a bit different, in that the links probably saw themselves in two over time, as opposed to rotting & breaking. I haven't run mine enough to come anywhere close to that.
I bought my 1/2" belting at the local Rockler Woodworking store. The last time, they had a very nice sale on the stuff ($4/ft?). When I went in, the amount I wanted (4 feet) left only 3 feet in the box, so they gave me the whole thing for the price of 4 feet.
Doug White
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On Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:48:47 GMT
<snip>

I was at HF earlier today and I was surprised to see they had these hanging on the wall:
http://www.harborfreight.com/vibration-free-link-belt-43771.html
Vibration Free Link Belt Item # 43771 Manufacturer: Accu-Link Size: 1/2" W x 5 ft. L $24.99
I didn't look at it too close, but noticed it was made in Italy.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Thanks to everyone. I put one in, it was a bit more difficult than I would have liked, but it seems to work fine now. I should have made it a little tighter, maybe I will retighten it after a while.
i

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