German language help?

There is a story in the news today about a Chinese company that bought
a German construction-equipment company named Putzmeister.
Now, I thought I knew what a "putz" was, and I know what "meister"
means, but I can't believe the two of them were put together to form a
company name.
I hope that someone familiar with German can explain this.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
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Ed Huntress fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I have only a smattering of German from back in the 80s, but "Putz" means "Put".
So I'd believe that their equipment is designed to "put" stuff... lift it, move it, place it...
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Aha! That would make sense. Their primary product is concrete pumps.
And it's a big relief. I was afraid they were "masters of idiots."
Thanks, Lloyd.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
I believe that it is mortar master. They make concrete pumps.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus2551
Ignoramus2551 fired this volley in news:jLOdnQNhEv7pSMXSnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Quite possible, though I don't have that nuance in what German I learned.
Like English, Germans tend to use one word for more than one meaning.
It might mean mortar, too.
More interesting, though, is what Germans do when they don't _have_ a word to describe something. Then they just string other ones together into a single noun that can be dozens of syllables long!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote in news:XnsA01067FB2E6CElloydspmindspringcom@216.168.3.70:
It means nothing of the sort. The German word meaning "to put" is "stecken".
"Putzen" means "to clean".
Reply to
Doug Miller
Ed Huntress wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
It would make more sense if it were correct.
I'm afraid your understanding of its meaning isn't correct either. "Putz", as a noun, in German means a small child; it can also mean dirty clothes (see a connection there?). In Yiddish, it's vulgar slang for "penis".
Reply to
Doug Miller
noun, in German
In Yiddish, it's
And those concrete pumpers have one very long "penis". My brother and I have always laughed at those trucks. The company must have known that some americans would think of that name as meaning "Master Penis".
Reply to
etpm
From my vast experience of ordering beers in East, West and United German, I summon the powers of Google and..
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New name: "Putzmeister" - for master plastering.. and indeed Google Translate says "plaster" is "putz" in German.
So, when you plaster something you are putzing around putting something pretty much purely decorative on there, which could represent a common origin with the slang 'putz' term.
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
a noun, in German
In Yiddish, it's
Well, yeah, what the heck? Most of us are more likely to know the vulgar definitions of anything. d8-)
English dictionaries also say "idiot." Maybe they mean us, for not knowing what it means.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
And here I thought maybe they were bragging about their sexual prowess.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
This.
E.g Putzfrau is a cleaning woman. Putzmeister suggests "cleaning master". (NB "Meister Proper" is German Mr. Clean).
Michael Koblic, Campbell River, BC
Reply to
mkoblic
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Birth of Putzmeister
In 1963, the name of KS-Maschinenbau was replaced by Putzmeister, which means "master of mortar" in German. Putzmeister has never left the concrete machinery industry ever since. Putzmeister's 'Elephant' concrete pump gained its popularity in early 70s, and has gradually made the company one of the global leaders in terms of market share, geographic coverage, technology advance as well as product range in concrete pumping industry.
Reply to
ATP
as a noun, in German
there?). In Yiddish, it's
Well, now, think about it, in English one subtle gradation of "idiot" is "dickhead". Yiddish just shortens it to "dick".
Reply to
J. Clarke
"J. Clarke" wrote in message
One meaning of putz is ornament, as in a Christmas decoration.
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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