Endless lathe chips (re-adjusted the clutch on a Clausing 6913 lathe)

I finally got around and re-adjusted the clutch on the Clausing 6913 lathe. (13x48). The clutch was previously slipping and I could only
make the lightest of cuts.
Now, the clutch no longer slips when engaged, and can still be disengaged, and I can take much heavier cuts. And what I like the most is that I can again use power feed.
The problem I had with one piece of metal, is that when I cut it with power feed and a carbide insert, it would make an endless chip, that warps and gets everywhere, and it seems to be unsafe. How can I ensure that this chip breaks?
i
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Use a cutter with a chipbreaker groove. "Stringy" chips ARE dangerous, and pretty easily avoided.
They're not only dangerous when flying around the chuck, but also to the operator who has to clean up afterwards.
Lloyd
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Chip breakers rely on a given amount of feed in order to function properly. Rule of thumb is to increase feed when a chip doesn't break. Do not expect a chip breaker to function with light feeds, or shallow depths of cut.
Harold
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On Sun, 19 May 2013 05:12:13 GMT, "Harold & Susan Vordos"

Good points. And sometimes, don't expect them to work at all.
If Iggy is dealing with some nickel alloy (like stainless), a higher feedrate will work-harden the chip and help it break. If it's some dead-soft low-carbon steel, maybe, maybe not.
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Just low carbon steel in this instance.
i
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On Sun, 19 May 2013 10:19:12 -0500, Ignoramus17710

Aggressive feed and good chip breakers should do it. If not, that's life. <g>
Low carbon steel should break from compression failure (you'd need a video to see it). But you need enough feed to "crumple" the chip in compression. You'll recognize it when you see it.
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Ig, I might add after your last comment about "not pushing your lathe too hard", that they're designed for that. Don't baby it, or you'll just wear out tooling and patience prematurely. Time (your time and your employees') is money.
There's nothin' wrong with smokin' blue chips once in a while.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> fired this volley in

But I might also add, that ties in with your question about coolant. You want the chips hot, but not the body of the work.
Lloyd
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On 2013-05-19, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Lloyd, I am happy now, that I can make thick blue chips that are also very consistent. And I agree with you in general, as long as the motor keeps up the RPM (which I can simply hear), it should be fine.
i
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On Sun, 19 May 2013 12:58:50 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Very well said!!
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I've never failed to break mild steel chips. Throw feed at it until it breaks---and it will. Bear in mind, I'm speaking of operating industrially rated equipment, where power isn't an issue. Home type machines often lack power, rigidity and the speed required (carbide).
Stainless can be a different issue, with which I agree. Stick to the free machining grades and it's a non-issue. I prefer them (416, 303 Se, then 303 S) to almost anything where machining and chip breaking is concerned. No problems with work hardening----just use sharp tools and keep the cut moving.
I have experienced materials that refuse to break. In such a case, I try for a coil spring. It's much safer than strings.
Harold
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 04:49:33 GMT, "Harold & Susan Vordos"

My little belt-driven SB10L, which is a more typical hobbyist's machine, doesn't like that kind of treatment. So I fiddle with grinding chipbreakers into my HSS tools until I get the best results I can.
Sometimes, machining some hot-rolled crap (which I try to avoid), ain't nuthin' that's going to break them, even pushing the feedrate to the machine's limits.
I have a really good bird's-nest hook. <g>

I have some cool-looking ones. d8-)
I'm sure that experienced commercial machinists would look at my setups and could give me a solution, but it's not much of a problem for me, anyway, because I don't often machine the materials that give that trouble.
Right now, I'm not machining anything. I have to replace the belt on my machine. Jim Rozen gave me some belt material but now I have to decide how to join it. Do you have any glue recommendations? I can make a clean scarf with no problem.
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snip----

Sorry, no. I have nothing to offer. I've never been faced with that problem, and have not been around the flat belt machines. Virtually all of my experience has come in industry, where such machines were not found.
The only SB that I ever experienced was a 17" Turnado (geared head), which I found to be borderline junk. It couldn't stand up to the rigors of the production shop. Not trying to be rude, just reporting what I experienced. There's a huge number of satisfied SB owners, I know.
Luck with the belt.
With those sticky materials that don't break well with HSS, a narrower and deeper breaker can be the solution, but it's not easy hitting the perfect balance, as a narrow breaker tends to trap the chip. I have a lot of experience with HSS----I used it alongside brazed carbide and insert tooling up to the day I closed the doors on my commercial (non CNC) shop. The real negative is that it's not easy sharpening once installed in a setup, unlike insert carbide. Registration is lost when the tool is removed for sharpening. For CNC operations, it most likely wouldn't serve well at all, but for the guy running manual machines, it really is a great solution to machining. That, of course, depends on one's ability to fashion tools with the correct geometry.
Harold
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 20:23:18 GMT, "Harold & Susan Vordos"

I have a lot of old brazed carbide tools, but sharpening them is a problem and I rarely waste my time with them. I use carbide mostly for turning fiberglass and other abrasive materials. When I'm building fishing rods and making ferrules, I cut enough of it that HSS just doesn't keep an edge.
However, I'll keep the narrow chip breaker in mind. And I'll keep looking for a good glue for the belt.
Thanks, Harold.
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 10:34:30 -0400, Ed Huntress

Wasn't there a recent thread about joining flat belts?
Anyway, we used to use hot animal glue - hoof and hide - to join flat leather belts. The length of the scarf is covered (I think) in the Machinery's Handbook but is several inches.
We normally used those patented splices that look like a row of staples for most machines though.
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John B.
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 06:27:40 +0700, John B. slocomb

Yeah, but there's got to be something better now.

Dobie Dave has one of those staplers that he'll let me use, but it's 'way too wide for my belt. The one on the lathe now is stapled. But I figured I'd just glue it.
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"Ed Huntress" wrote in message wrote:

I wonder how that polyurethane gorilla glue, or similar, would work?
<snip>
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wrote:

I use that stuff for a variety of things, including gluing my son's soccer shoes back together, and it's true that it's somewhat flexible and has great adhesion.
I just don't think it's flexible *enough*. Something like Pliobond or Shoe Goo would be more flexible. But I don't know if they have enough sheer strength.
I'll probably wind up calling some adhesives expert. Cripes, I used to write long articles about adhesive assembly, but the adhesives I know about are almost as old as hide glue.
--
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wrote:

The best stuff is called Barge cement. It's alike pliobond, but a lot better on leather. It is what shoe makers use to attach soles.
That being said, the stuff is hard to find (just like shoemakers) and a gallon would last me 20 lifetimes.
I have used Gorilla glue on my lathe belt and it is still working fine 10+ years later. I think that, although the dried glue is fairly rigid, it is able to fracture into a series of narrow rigid joints that roll around the pulleys like tank treads
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It's also pretty similar to rubber cement, used in the "contact cement" mode (apply, dry, and stick.) At least 20 year old memories say so.
Either of those is pretty easy to find and might work well enough if you are not going with metal lacing (which is what I prefer, since it can be undone.) You may also want to actually lace (the leather version from which the metal version takes it's name) the joint as well.
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