Oddball die wanted

I am looking for an oddball size dienut-9/16"-28. Can anyone direct me to a
source or perhaps someone who will custom make a dienut this size? It will
be used for cleaning up existing threads, not cutting new threads. I reall
y do not want to try to make on myself.....
Reply to
Gerry
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a source or perhaps someone who will custom make a dienut this size? It wi ll be used for cleaning up existing threads, not cutting new threads. I rea lly do not want to try to make on myself.....
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Reply to
Cross-Slide
a source or perhaps someone who will custom make a dienut this size? It wi ll be used for cleaning up existing threads, not cutting new threads. I rea lly do not want to try to make on myself.....
Reply to
Gerry
a source or perhaps someone who will custom make a dienut this size? It wi ll be used for cleaning up existing threads, not cutting new threads. I rea lly do not want to try to make on myself.....
For some reason I cannot reply to Cross-Slide-Thank you, that is just what I need!
Reply to
Gerry
Gerry fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com:
Gerry, Since you call it a "dienut", and we on the west side of the pond call it a "die", I presume you're UK?
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Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
source or perhaps someone who will custom make a dienut this size? It will be used for cleaning up existing threads, not cutting new threads. I really do not want to try to make on myself.....
Try your local gunsmith. It's used on gun barrels. Oh, here ya go. $26.44, delivered. (hmm, + $15.25 to UK) Google is your friend:
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
That link shows a split die which is different to a dienut. A dienut is typically hexagonal and used to clean up existing threads, some here
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Reply to
David Billington
If there is not much cleaning to be done, if the threads don't need to be real pretty, and if you have a 9/16-28 nut, you can use the nut to clean them up by using a hacksaw blade to put a few teeth on the nut's threads. But then, who has a 9/16-28 nut?
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
David Billington fired this volley in news:5198a057$0$1144$ snipped-for-privacy@news.zen.co.uk:
If you read the included text, you'll note they _also_ carry "die-nuts". (and that's called an "adjustable die"...)
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Bob Engelhardt fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@news1.newsguy.com:
Pretty much any gunsmith worth his salt would have 9/16-28 thread chasing equipment. I wonder if the op has enough use for it to require buying the tool, or if a trip to a smith would be more effective.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
The only size close I found at Brownells was 9/16x24. Spent years gunsmithi ng and never needed a 9/16x28. I rebuild MGB steering columns as a sideline business and some columns use 9/16x28 threads to attach the steering wheel . Often columns come to me with buggered threads from people using a hammer and backed off nut to jar steering wheel off the shaft. I usually have to turn down the first thread or two in order to be able to reuse the old thre ads. Way too much trouble to set up to pick up the thread and recut in my l athe-less trouble to remove the threaded section of the shaft and replace i t with new. So yes, I do have enough need to purchase the proper size die. Thanks to all who responded
Reply to
Gerry
Gerry fired this volley in news:b9846ec9-f151-4a6e- snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com:
common flash-suppressor thread LS
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
and never needed a 9/16x28. I rebuild MGB steering columns as a sideline business and some columns use 9/16x28 threads to attach the steering wheel. Often columns come to me with buggered threads from people using a hammer and backed off nut to jar steering wheel off the shaft. I usually have to turn down the first thread or two in order to be able to reuse the old threads. Way too much trouble to set up to pick up the thread and recut in my lathe-less trouble to remove the threaded section of the shaft and replace it with new. So yes, I do have enough need to purchase the proper size die. Thanks to all who responded
Actually...its fairly easy to pick up a thread on a lathe, particularly fine threads. You just have to take out any backlash while finding the thread.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Not easy to pick up thread on these jobs because after years of abuse the t hreaded ends of these MGB columns are almost never true. Chuck it in my lat he and they wobble too much to be able to recut the threads with a single p oint tool. The threaded end of the shaft gets bent by people using a hammer beating on the end of the shaft to remove the steering wheel from it's spl ined shaft and tapered seat. Hence the need of a dienut to clean damaged th reads.
Reply to
Gerry
source or perhaps someone who will custom make a dienut this size? It will be used for cleaning up existing threads, not cutting new threads. I really do not want to try to make on myself.....
Surprised nobody mentioned thread files. Extremely affordable, works great with a lathe.
Reply to
Steve Walker
But until the relatively recent love affair with the M-16 flash suppressor's were un-common :-)
Reply to
John B.
source or perhaps someone who will custom make a dienut this size? It will be used for cleaning up existing threads, not cutting new threads. I really do not want to try to make on myself.....
Very true! Ive just never seen a thread file in -28 before. Ive got a bunch of thread files..both standard and metric..but none in 28 tpi
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Gunner Asch fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Snap-on sells a set of three that specifically calls out 28tpi as one of the 'fit' threads. (9-32tpi, and several metric sizes).
Of course, Snap-on is always pricey, but their tools are always being dumped by someone in debt and looking for a quick buck.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Thanks! Ill have to double check my file pitches and if I dont have one...will have to snag one somewhere. Im pretty sure I dont....but...need to double check
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Make sure you do double check, since no one needs too many tools...
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

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