Machine Gun Parts kits



Finish? That was the stuff I was trying to remember, specifically Finish Glass Magic. Finish Quantum PowerBall too. The magic ingredient is phosphate.

Boiling lye, to dissolve the hairballs?
Actually, what I do is to put a pile of straight lye in the drain and pour in about a cup of water, and let it work for awhile. Don't forget to rinse it all away later.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Finish, used to be Electrosol. I used the Finish Quantum packets.

Not the problem. The problem is 90-year-old cast iron pipe that I was having to auger out about once a month. The lye quit working 10 years ago. Sulfuric acid stopped working 5 years ago. It's time to bite the bullet.
I used a cast-iron pipe cracker and I've cracked the pipe at both ends. Now I have to work fast and replace it with PVC. If my wife has to bail the tub after showering during the work week, my ass is grass. <g> >

I was getting really good at that, buying my lye in bulk from these guys:
http://www.essentialdepot.com/
They have frequent sales.
Thanks to the sulfuric acid, my next job is to re-finish the tub with two-part polyurethane. Ugh. d8-(
--
Ed Huntress

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[snip]

The PVC pipe is noisier than cast iron, so you may want to wrap it in something to keep toilet-flush sounds down. At the very least, vibration isolate it from the joists and studs.

Good source of supply. Thanks.

This cannot be a vitreous enameled cast iron tub, which would laugh at anything save hydrofluoric acid.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Ok, but this is a horizontal stretch that drains only the tub.

That's the way I did it. I was using a pound per shot at the end, before it just quit.

Yes, it is a vitreous enameled cast iron tub, probably 60 years old. And yes, the sulfuric flaked the enamel off the surface. It's like white sand in the bottom of the tub after you take a shower. And it wore right through at the drain.
--
Ed Huntress

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Probably just wore the enamel out, over the decades. Does a puddle of water sit there, not quite able to drain? Glass does dissolve in water, but very slowly. This will render the glass porous and fragile.
So, after the recoat, make sure that the tub drains completely, leaving no puddles.
I've never recoated a bathtub, so I don't have any information on the best approach, but I'd have to think that two-part epoxy is the best way.
The key is to get things *really* clean - even the slightest soap film will totally defeat adhesion. One needs to use an acid that will chemically destroy the soap, especially the non-sodium soaps that form the core of soap scum, then neutralize the acid, etc. And follow up with Bon Ami and lots of elbow grease.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

It would, if I didn't bail and sponge it out. But no, I don't leave water standing in the tub.

Supposedly the two-part polyurethane is much more abrasion-resistant than epoxy. That would agree with current treatment of high-performance boats. I see that's what the quality refinishers are using, and someone -- maybe Sherwin-Wiliams? PPG? makes a kit just for that purpose. You apply it with a fine sponge roller. The spray is highly toxic.

I'll first sand it down a bit with a vibrating sander, I think, but I'll be checking into the recommended prep methods first. I realize it could be troublesome.
I appreciate the tips, Joe. I hate to screw these things up; there isn't time to do it twice.
--
Ed Huntress

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Does the faucet drip? That too will cut a groove in the enamel.

OK. Sounds like Imron.

I would *not* use a power sander, for fear of accidentally cutting through to the iron.
I'd use wet-dry sandpaper on a rubber block, wet. And a bright light not in your eyes, so you can see what's going on.

Yeah. I'd look up the paint manufacturer's instructions on cleaning. Do they offer this paint as suitable for bathtubs? If so, they will have detailed instructions.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Yes, it's made for bathtubs. I'll be very careful and make sure I have instructions for doing it. I'm kind of attached to our old tub, and I don't want to go three or four days without a shower because I screwed it up. I'd feel like I was back in France, but without a bidet. d8-)
(Actually, I'd just walk down to the YMCA and shower there. I've planned for emergencies.)
--
Ed Huntress



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Good luck. Tell us how it comes out. Even if it isn't metalworking.
Joe Gwinn
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On Sat, 23 Mar 2013 13:12:25 -0400, Ed Huntress

Finish Quantum along with their rins agent works quite well in my 2008 sears (Whirlpool) dishwasher.
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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When I studied chemistry in the 60's the profs said that Tide was the best lab glassware cleaner. Much of the glassware had unbrushable shapes and any residue, especially of metallic salts, could poison the next experiment.
http://www.pg.com/productsafety/msds/fabric_and_homecare/detergents/Liq_2X_TIde_products_-_all_updated_03-13.pdf Notice that the dose of alcohol that kills half the rats that drink it is only 0.7% of their weight.
If Tide failed we resorted to hot chromic acid, which could strip the pavement off the street.
jsw
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I do recall some Tide versus Alconox debates from the day, with echos to this day. Both are used to this day. The cost of detergent is a tiny fraction of the cost of running a lab, so I don't really understand the point of the argument.

q_2X_TIde_products_-_all_updated_03-13.pdf>

This is about twice the estimated LD50 dose for humans. We always knew that rats were tough little critters, and this completes the proof - pound for pound, they can drink us under the table.
However, this MSDS is for liquid Tide, which didn't exist in the 1960s. I wonder what the formula was back then? It will have had something like 10% phosphorus in it.

And dissolve stainless steel? I do recall the use of hot chromic acid.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Since the 1940's the most effective ingredient has been the alkylbenzenesulfonate surfactant.
How it works: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surfactant
jsw
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Thanks; I'll look into this.
But for instance the user's manual for my circa 1999 dishwasher says if the detergent is less than 8% phosphorus, they (Bosch) do not guarantee dishwashing performance.
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and others wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/dxau9av They don't give it away, do they? $8-10 a pound, delivered.

I picked up a little ultrasonic in CA when I was there last year. Vinegar is likely going to work for me, until proven inadequate.

A buddy of mine worked in the appliance repair biz for a decade and has made an oath to never buy a Bosch appliance. He said they break at the tip of a hat and are expensive as hell to repair, with delays for parts, etc. He really hates them. It surprised me. I've only seen one and it was on when I was looking at it. I couldn't hear it!
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Nope. But the stuff really works, and the lab community loves it, and have for decades. I learned of it in the late 1960s, and it was the standard then.

Actually, what really works is 10% isopropyl alcohol in water, according to the books on the engineering of ultrasonic cleaning systems I have read.

When was that? Consumer Reports gave Bosch good grades, and I've had the current one for at least 12 years so far. The only repair needed was to replace a hose. And it is quiet, a big reason I chose it.
And Maytag had a reputation for reliability, but now they are much worse than average.
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wrote:

OK.

Thanks, Joe. I'll give it a try. I have some 70% and 90% I can dilute. Would denatured work? I keep a gallon on hand.

2007 is when I saw one. My buddy told me the war stories last year.

I bought Magic Chef (made by Maytag, the only difference being that I got a plastic tub instead of SS, the repairman said) washer and dryer when I moved here in 2002. Later in 2002, I got a warranty motor put in the washer and new rollers put in the dryer. The new rollers were just as bad (thump, thump, thump upon startup, and the repairman told me there would be no improvement) and there wasn't.
Gimme a 20 y/o Kenmore next time, eh?
--
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I'm still running the Maytag washing machine I bought second-hand in 1981. I drilled and tapped the transmission for an oil filler and pump in 90W gear oil to replace the oil that leaks out the bottom about yearly, or when it gets noisy.
Maytag replacement drive belts slip enough to let the motor come up to speed quickly . A standard, higher friction belt can burn out the start winding. jsw
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On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 00:27:01 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Yeah, ancient Kenmores and Maytags are the cat's meow. Drilled and tapped for a filler tube, eh? Cool.

That new motor of mine released its magic chef smoke...with their OEM belt on it.
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The repair manual revealed an open area with nothing to damage inside. I used a spiral flute tap that pulled the continuous chips back out. The bottletop pump was meant to refill an outboard lower unit. It works on my truck transmission and transfer case too. jsw
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