Machinist's Library?

I've been a machinist (vertical mill/Bridgeport) for several
years now and while I think I'm pretty good at it, (at least
the boss has no complaints) I've had no formal education
in machining/metalworking and everything I know has been
learned on-the-job from more experienced machinists (who
all learned on-the-job also).
Wanting to expand my knowledge of metalworking (and
increase my value to my employer/future employers) but
not having to time to get the schooling, I was thinking about
building up my own "machinist's library".
I'd like to eventually have a collection of metalworking books
ranging from basic high school machine shop type text books
up to specialized books concerning CNC programming, shop
management, metallurgy, shop math, welding, machine repair,
ect, ect, ect.
After looking thru several catalogs from supply companies
I see there are all kinds of books available but they're quite
expensive and the descriptions of the book's contents are
seriously lacking.
So what kinds of machining books do you have and which
would you recommend? And while I'm at it, any good web
sites related to the industry?
Reply to
Hari Seldon
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The absolute hugest most critical mistake you can possibly make is to buy such books without first reading them through carefully. How to read them before buying? Simple - you check them out of your local library! Your library doesn't have one? Simple - you request an interlibrary loan.
If you buy books without knowing if they're useful (most aren't) you will waste a ton of money.
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Best darned advice I have seen in a long time!!!!!
Get the librarians to dig through their resources and come up with copies. Read them and if interested go to Amazon or just plain Google until you find a used copy for a buck.
Reply to
Wayne Lundberg
Most machine shop books are old. Everybody is focusing on CNC today and don't have a clue as to non CNC machining.
Reply to
Wayne Lundberg
While we are on the subject. How many volumes are there in Moltrecht's Machine Shop Proctice?
TIA
Chuck P.
Reply to
MOP CAP
I've probably got 50 or 60 of them, maybe more, but I'm not going to recommend any. That's because I think you have an opportunity to increase your value and to document it at the same time. In other words, you probably can combine distance learning and "comping out" (taking final tests, without the classes), to acquire certification or an associate's degree). To do that you'll need the syllabus and book list from the program you're interested in.
Most of us here have a lot of classics and books of interest mainly to hobbyists. They used to be the meat and potatoes of the industry but no more. Now, particularly in CNC and metallurgy, you'll want the latest.
So I'd check into the best machining/CNC program at nearby colleges (community colleges, if that's where the action is in your area) and see what the possibilities are. You're going to study the books, anyway. You'd might as well get something for it. And, if your programs are like the ones here, you can do it at your own pace.
If you can talk to an instructor there you probably can get their current book lists.
Good luck. You're going to need more certification and/or a degree in the future. This business is changing, and education is the best protection against finding yourself out in the cold. It's no guarantee, but it helps.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
To start with get a Machinery's Handbook, pre-60's editions on ebay are nice for manual machines. The older editions also have lots of old-time techniques and receipes for everything from sealing high pressure steam pipes to techniques for controlling dust on earth floors. Its a great resource.
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is a good website to visit as well.
Gregm
"Hari Seld> I've been a machinist (vertical mill/Bridgeport) for several
Reply to
Greg Menke
IMO, Anyone who reads this group needs a copy of machinery's handbook.
Reply to
Jon Grimm
Two, last I heard.
Mike
Reply to
Mike Henry
================ see
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feel free to browse the entire site.
Uncle George
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
They used to call your experience 'apprenticeship'; a very good way to learn a trade. For long term detailed reference, except for newer technology, I also recommend Machinery's Handbook. Bugs
Reply to
Bugs
I have about 20 titles, of which I can recall only a few at the moment. I check the local used book stores pretty regularly and pick up most titles for under $10, often much less. Last night the only thing of interest was a Warner-Swasey hardback on operating a turret lathe. At $9.98 I wasn't really interested. If anyone here is, I'll stop back by and buy it for you.
Rex B Fort Worth
Reply to
Rex B
Try to get a copy of Machine tool Metal by Feirer and Tatro. library of congress # 60-13765. l believe it's a hig school or trade school textbook. Also Machinery's handbook I have a copy of each of these to sell for $35 together if interested Plus book rate postage from 92115 Thx Dan
Reply to
daniel peterman
--Sorry, couldn't resist, how's the encyclopedia coming? ;-)
Reply to
steamer
According to Mike Henry :
That's what my set is. But -- I seem to remember reading here some years back that it was at one time published as a single volume.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
According to steamer :
I wonder how many will get that one? It *can't* be an accident, because the spelling of the first name is even correct for the interpretation.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Slowly but steadily. I'd get more done but Dors is keeping me up at night. Man, that gal is like a machine!....
Reply to
Hari Seldon
Sure, but I was just looking for opinions from the group on which books you guys think are worthwhile, to narrow the search down a bit.
What does the group think about getting an earlier (and cheaper) edition of Machinery's Handbook, say the 26th edition?
Reply to
Hari Seldon
FWIW -- the earlier editions, even before the 26th may be better for the typical [manual] machinist. Only real lack may be metric information which may or may not be a problem. Uncle George
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
According to Hari Seldon :
[ ... ]
I would suggest that there is benefit to be had from both an older edition (e.g. I have a 16th edition), and a more recent one, with the 25th having added some collet information not in the previous edition.
I don't know what the 26th or 27th may offer which are not in the 25th, as I don't have these.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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