Machinist's Library?

I've been a machinist (vertical mill/Bridgeport) for several years now and while I think I'm pretty good at it, (at least
the boss has no complaints) I've had no formal education in machining/metalworking and everything I know has been learned on-the-job from more experienced machinists (who all learned on-the-job also).
Wanting to expand my knowledge of metalworking (and increase my value to my employer/future employers) but not having to time to get the schooling, I was thinking about building up my own "machinist's library".
I'd like to eventually have a collection of metalworking books ranging from basic high school machine shop type text books up to specialized books concerning CNC programming, shop management, metallurgy, shop math, welding, machine repair, ect, ect, ect.
After looking thru several catalogs from supply companies I see there are all kinds of books available but they're quite expensive and the descriptions of the book's contents are seriously lacking.
So what kinds of machining books do you have and which would you recommend? And while I'm at it, any good web sites related to the industry?
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Hari Seldon wrote:

The absolute hugest most critical mistake you can possibly make is to buy such books without first reading them through carefully. How to read them before buying? Simple - you check them out of your local library! Your library doesn't have one? Simple - you request an interlibrary loan.
If you buy books without knowing if they're useful (most aren't) you will waste a ton of money.
Grant
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Best darned advice I have seen in a long time!!!!!
Get the librarians to dig through their resources and come up with copies. Read them and if interested go to Amazon or just plain Google until you find a used copy for a buck.

such
before
doesn't
waste
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While we are on the subject. How many volumes are there in Moltrecht's Machine Shop Proctice?
TIA
Chuck P.
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Two, last I heard.
Mike
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    That's what my set is. But -- I seem to remember reading here some years back that it was at one time published as a single volume.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 00:41:07 GMT, Wayne Lundberg wrote:

www.abebooks.com is great - second hand book search engine, It has bot cost me a lot of money and saved me a lot at the same time...
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Most machine shop books are old. Everybody is focusing on CNC today and don't have a clue as to non CNC machining.

such
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Sure, but I was just looking for opinions from the group on which books you guys think are worthwhile, to narrow the search down a bit.
What does the group think about getting an earlier (and cheaper) edition of Machinery's Handbook, say the 26th edition?
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On 20 Dec 2005 16:08:25 -0800, "Hari Seldon"
<snip>

FWIW -- the earlier editions, even before the 26th may be better for the typical [manual] machinist. Only real lack may be metric information which may or may not be a problem. Uncle George
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    [ ... ]

    I would suggest that there is benefit to be had from both an older edition (e.g. I have a 16th edition), and a more recent one, with the 25th having added some collet information not in the previous edition.
    I don't know what the 26th or 27th may offer which are not in the 25th, as I don't have these.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I also have the nice green 16th - bought new and the large print 25 (blue).
Consider alloy information on cutter material. Some names are not in the new book at all. In the new book there are carbide and it isn't in the old. I have old screw specs in the old one - new one dominates on the new stuff and not so much on the old.
Someone in the group has a shelf of different versions.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
DoN. Nichols wrote:

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Hari Seldon wrote:

My newest Machinery's is a 21st edition. Also have a Fifth edition that has some potentially useful info not found in the later offerings.
Machine Shop Primer Colvin/Stanley 1910 First edition, covering equipment, tools, and shop terms of the time. Neat book. One can see the changes, or lack thereof, in equipment, etc. I found that oil-fed drills were used then. Would have thought that was a more recent development.
Shop and Foundry Practice 1903, if I was wanting to do some home foundry work, blacksmithing, or forging, this has probably everything I would need to know. After flipping through it, I'll make some time to read the blacksmithing & forging sections. Also have Shop Theory from the Henry Ford Trade School printed in 1942, Machine Shop Practice 2 vol set by Moltrecht 1981, and a few others including welding.
Like you, I had no formal apprenticeship and have gotten lots of OJT since 1970, including 21 years as a business owner. I've learned something from all of these books and expect to learn more when I find time to do a bit more reading. All of the older books were aquired at no cost to me from friends who figured I would find them of better use than would they.
I guess my suggestion is don't pass anything up, especially if the price is right.
mj
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Grant Erwin wrote:

I have not had much success finding books in the library that have been mentioned here, even with ILL. I remember once doing a nation-wide library search without finding the book.
An alternative to the library for reading-before-buying is eBay "rental". Buy a used one on eBay, being careful to not pay more than the going rate. Read it and then re-sell it on eBay. On the average it will cost shipping and seller fees.
Bob
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I've probably got 50 or 60 of them, maybe more, but I'm not going to recommend any. That's because I think you have an opportunity to increase your value and to document it at the same time. In other words, you probably can combine distance learning and "comping out" (taking final tests, without the classes), to acquire certification or an associate's degree). To do that you'll need the syllabus and book list from the program you're interested in.
Most of us here have a lot of classics and books of interest mainly to hobbyists. They used to be the meat and potatoes of the industry but no more. Now, particularly in CNC and metallurgy, you'll want the latest.
So I'd check into the best machining/CNC program at nearby colleges (community colleges, if that's where the action is in your area) and see what the possibilities are. You're going to study the books, anyway. You'd might as well get something for it. And, if your programs are like the ones here, you can do it at your own pace.
If you can talk to an instructor there you probably can get their current book lists.
Good luck. You're going to need more certification and/or a degree in the future. This business is changing, and education is the best protection against finding yourself out in the cold. It's no guarantee, but it helps.
-- Ed Huntress
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To start with get a Machinery's Handbook, pre-60's editions on ebay are nice for manual machines. The older editions also have lots of old-time techniques and receipes for everything from sealing high pressure steam pipes to techniques for controlling dust on earth floors. Its a great resource.
http://www.practicalmachinst.com is a good website to visit as well.
Gregm

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IMO, Anyone who reads this group needs a copy of machinery's handbook.
writes:

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On 19 Dec 2005 16:06:35 -0800, "Hari Seldon"

===============see http://www.mcduffee-associates.us/machining/machining_books.htm
feel free to browse the entire site.
Uncle George
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They used to call your experience 'apprenticeship'; a very good way to learn a trade. For long term detailed reference, except for newer technology, I also recommend Machinery's Handbook. Bugs
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Hari Seldon wrote:

I have about 20 titles, of which I can recall only a few at the moment. I check the local used book stores pretty regularly and pick up most titles for under $10, often much less. Last night the only thing of interest was a Warner-Swasey hardback on operating a turret lathe. At $9.98 I wasn't really interested. If anyone here is, I'll stop back by and buy it for you.
Rex B Fort Worth
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