Making yer own backup generator?

wrote:


But she probably served at least a twelve year apprenticeship, and as far as digital thermometers, my Gran would lick her finger and judge the temperature by the sound when she tapped the hot object - digital or what?

--
Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Having thicker, calloused male skin I put my fingers where the food will be and count. Two to three is about right, eight is too cool. That's a Boy Scout "digital" thermometer.
My sister used to get upset every Thanksgiving when the men passed the hot dishes with our mechanic's hands after she warned us they were too hot. She stopped after I showed her a deep cut that hadn't bled. Then she realized that our hands are like her feet.
On a wood stove, a good cooking heat is when water droplets ball up and bounce instead of wetting the surface.
I can be very high tech or very low, aerospace and axes.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I remember an old saying from a black cook -- "If it sizzles when you spit, it ain't hot enough!"
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The differences are a tight modern house, concern for the smoke, and not being near the stove all the time. I grew up in an 1830 house with fireplaces and a coal furnace and my sister still cooked on a woodstove until a few years ago.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now, the houses that really stank were those regularly lighted by kerosene lanterns.
When I was growing up in rural Florida, we still had a few "old folks" in the communiity living in houses without power, and without any intent to ever get power. They had hand-pumped wells, out-houses, wood heating and cookstoves, and kerosene lamps for nighttime lighting.
And boy, you could really SMELL the kerosene in the walls, rugs, clothing, EVERYTHING, when you went to visit one of them! You'd smell it for hours after you left.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

My grandparents in rural Alabama lived like that when I was little, but I don't remember much kerosine smell over the barnyard odor, which I quickly got used to. Anyway they went to bed and got up pretty much with the sun.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Jul 2012 06:00:25 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Au contraire, mon ami. I even taught my ex-BIL how not to smoke up a room while adding wood. He'd hover over the damned fire for half an hour, smoke filling the damned house every time. I finally cured him of that.

I'd love to find a wood-stove-heated house which did NOT have smoke smell, but I haven't yet, and lots of folks here have the damned things. And I've rented books from the library which reeked of woodsmoke, too.

Unless you use fans in every room, they'll be badly stratified, PERIOD. (The laws of physics aren't easily denied.)
And for those of you who think you're being eco-smart, wood stoves pollute 20-100 times more than other forms of heating. During a day of inversion, I drove through Merlin, OR fog/smoke only to find a single badly-managed woodstove the cause of the entire area's distress. It must have been wet piss oak, too, because it reeked to high heavens. I've never been so amazed at the source of a pollution as that one. I saw it later in the town, too, so it's a common problem there when the winds stop. Horrible!
My next-door neighbor has an extremely efficient pellet stove, and it reeks downwind, too. His house doesn't smell like smoke because he's very careful not to open it when running. This type of stove is much less offensive, but they still suffer from stratification of air.
Nope, I'm no fan of woodsmoking stoves.
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I heated my whole house in (admittedly mild Florida) winter for six years with one. I can honestly say that other than the creosote odor that came out while the doors were open, I never had so much as a wisp of smoke or smoke odor in the house.
I did have an external combustion air supply, in order not to suck good heated air back out the stack, and it was a good-quality gasketed stove.
It was placed in a room that had no door headers exiting to the rest of the house, and we had "passive returns" across all doors to bedrooms, etc, so that may have been the reason the heat did not "stratify", as he says.
If we wanted to warm up a room quickly, we'd use a fan on the floor to exhaust cold air back from that room into the great room. Otherwise, no.
We loved it. Now I live in a "hermetically sealed" house, and don't really like the odors that accumulate in it during window-shut seasons.
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like time to drill a hole, or two?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message
We loved it. Now I live in a "hermetically sealed" house, and don't really like the odors that accumulate in it during window-shut seasons.
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

I tightened up the doors and windows and attic hatch in the main first-floor living space but not so much in the basement where the woodstove is. When the stove is hot it heats some of the floor-level cold air drawn in by the chimney flow, enough to clear out fried onion smell in 3-4 hours. When it's cold the air exchange nearly stops, the basement slowly cools as it trades residual warmth with upstairs.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Jul 2012 16:42:31 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:>I heated my whole house in (admittedly mild Florida) winter for six years

From 1982 till '94 I worked monday till thursday in a building that was advertise, when it was built in '77, to be the most energy efficient office building in Canada. The only place I ever worked where I could break wind thursday afternoon and still smell it monday morning!
--
Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:

You needed to change your diet so that you didn't break wind.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Jul 2012 21:06:31 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Twelve years in that ZOO and I took a retirement package - best move I ever made - went out with less than 50% pension and started to enjoy life at 55! Of course I still haven't figured out how I ever had time to go to work!
--
Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Jul 2012 20:07:52 -0400, the renowned snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:

700 University?
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Jul 2012 22:33:20 -0400, Spehro Pefhany

4900 Yonge St.

--
Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Jul 2012 20:07:52 -0400, grmiller wrote:
(...)

At my last employer, punishment for complaining about management sabotage consisted of moving the employee to an area of the building with no HVAC or any kind of air circulation at all. It was pretty pungent (I hear tell.) :)
--Winston
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In order to accomplish my four day work schedule, I worked 7:30 AM till 6:00 PM. The air handling unit shut down at 5:00 and BOY did that place get stuffy in a hurry!
--
Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Jul 2012 23:55:32 -0400, grmiller wrote:
(...)

It's a little scary how much we rely on our support systems in sealed buildings.
--Winston
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A reliable engine is going to cost, no matter what you put on the alternator side. The breakpoint on cost seems to be at the 5-6KW point, twice that power costs way more than twice the price. If you just want some kind of AC out, you can probably cobble something up from a lawn tractor engine and a surplus alternator. If you want AC that's got stable voltage AND stable frequency, then that's going to cost more. You'll have to have some sort of governor that adjusts the engine speed with the load and does so quickly.
I've dealt with the consequences of having crappy auxilary power when the 15 KV feeder line got blown down over the channel at the shipyard and we had to run stuff on borrowed USAF generators for a couple of weeks. They tried running the computer room on one of the semi-sized units, was never clean enough to run the computer for more than 20 minutes without crashing and they damaged four disk drives doing it, several hundred grand's damage from bad power. A minor glitch in the governor design COULD have expensive consequences if you're trying to run freezers and refrigerators from your home-built generator.
You have to watch out with the low-ball guys, engines tend to be chink, ditto alternators, are they going to have parts when you need them? Things like oil filters tend to be a lot more than their automotive counterparts for those engines.
Stan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah... I cripple along with my 3.5KW job, doing scheduled runs of the fridges and freezer, but not being able to run much more except a couple of lights. Have gas for cooking, though.
I was given a "worn out" John Deere estate tractor. It had about 15K hours on it. Tranny shot, deck shot, frame shot. But the engine is still good, and currently supported, so a fairly low-cost rebuild should get it really 'right' (although it runs very well as-is).
It's a 36HP, liquid cooled, 3-cylinder Yanmar diesel WITH a hydraulic governor. I have known the guy, and coveted the mower for years, so when he went to junk it, he gave it to me. The thing wouldn't even change notes when it went from pavement to foot-high grass, so the governor seems to work really well.
Should be just the trick for a 22KW job. Now, if I can just find an 1800rpm gen-head at the price I'd like to pay...
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.