Monarch AA vs Polamco/Toolmex TUG 40 lathe



I do not "have" a smaller lathe, right now, but I could take one of the three Hardinges off sale and then I would "have" it.
I think that what I really need is this Monarch and a hardinge HC style for small parts and high speed.
We use the lathe for shop purposes only, not to make money on it.
i
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Ignoramus8699 wrote:

Iggy , the Monarch and a smaller lathe with higher speed will give you the best of both worlds . I've never seen a Hardinge , but everything I've read indicates they're very good machines . Fortunately , the 10" Logan/Wards fills my needs quite handily .
--
Snag



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I feel the same way about this. Hardinge for tiny stuff, Monarch for everything else. Low top speed also is safer.
i
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Even older -- the old F.E. Reed taper machines. 'Built like tanks! They could turn a full-swing part to tolerance every time -- but slowly, natch.
Lloyd
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On Friday, May 22, 2015 at 9:55:52 PM UTC-4, Ignoramus8699 wrote:

Good decision, especially since it has a taper attachment. I assume it has a three phase motor. So you could add a Variable Speed Drive and get high er speeds. I would not try for really high speeds as heavy things turning at high speed have a lot of stored energy.
Dan
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On Fri, 22 May 2015 20:40:21 -0500, Ignoramus8699

Isn't the final finish determined by tool type, style, and speed on each material? That can be a biggie.
--
Win first, Fight later.

--martial principle of the Samurai
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First, if Iggy keeps that Hardinge for the small diameter work, I'd agree keep this Monarch lathe. I'll wager if he keeps two, the Monarch will sit unless he can't fit the part in the Hardinge.
I find surface feet per minute critical for finish and part deflection, especially if you get under 0.500" diameter. My lathe does 4500, I'm up to top end often. I needed a number of long 0.125" diameter parts with threads and snap ring grooves a while back. Ended up running them on my neighbor's lathe that does 10K.
I also find carbide will just chip if you try to run it slow. i loose more inserts to chipping than to wear.
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On Fri, 22 May 2015 20:40:21 -0500, Ignoramus8699

It isn't even, perhaps, a lot slower then what some of the people here seem to be doing with their high speed, tiny cuts.
One of my last jobs during my apprenticeship was to rough out some wood planer heads from some 12 inch "line shafting" that was removed from an old woolen mill when they converted from overhead shafts.
This is from memory but the cutter head would have been about 2 feet wide, plain bearing on one side, say 6 inches and a bearing and two or three V pulley on the other. Say 3 and a half feet over all. The ends were, say 2 inch and the cutter head about 6 maybe 7 inches. So more or less, three inches of cut over the head and more over the end shafts.
We were taking about a 3/8", maybe 7/16", deep cut and the rotational and cutting speed was set to get a very light brown chip. A single pass took ~about 3 hours to remove 581 cu. in. or material, or 194 cu. inches/hour. Of course, as the work got smaller the rotational speed was increased but the depth of cut was always the same. Until we got to the bottom, of course :-)
As we had an automatic stop on the feed the old machine didn't take a full time manager, just a quick look every 15 minutes or so :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
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I read a comparison between the Hardinge HLV and the South Bend 10L that concluded the South Bend was a better choice for general non-critical work because of its geater versatility and back-gearing that allows heavy cuts on large diameters. The author had used both at the National Bureau of Standards shop. The Hardinge was better for precision threading but not decisively so. He (and I) valued 5C collets and low speed torque more than the name on the machine.
I designed an optical instrument that required #0-80 (~1.5mm) Fillister head screws almost 1" long due to very limited space, they straddled a lens thread in stacked modules that had to align with a glued-together array of 10mm cube optics. http://www.lambda.cc/high-power-laser-polarizing-cube-beamsplitters-hpb-2/
I turned the prototype screws in one piece on my SB, but the shop that filled the order on a Hardinge attached separate heads to shanks.made of 1/16" rod.
-jsw
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Ignoramus8699 prodded the keyboard with:

They are quite a nice lathe ! I would investigate putting an inverter/VFD in there to get higher speeds. I've seen similar machines running great at 140Hz, which should get you up into the 1200/1400 rpm range. Certainly the machine is quite capable of using the higher speeds.
--
Best Regards:
Baron.
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replying to John B., Toolmaker51 wrote: Just remember, RPM selection is a function of part diameter, not available speed. What earlier machine tools lacked in RPM they had torque in spades, provided by large diameter motors, chucks and faceplates adding flywheel inertia. And willing to bet 90% of the lathes people operate (in capital and private use) _are not_ mounted on correct foundation bed/ leveled/ lagged/ and grouted to enable full performance. Next, tooling comes into question, such as max speed of chucks, of which EVERY chuck has limitations.
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