Overheating AA batteries

This evening the GF noticed that the remote control wasn't working & was hot. I pulled out the extremely hot AA batteries.
It looks like the spring contact in the remote control, on the negative side had worn away the plastic covering on the side of the battery & shorted the side metal battery casing to the negative contact, thereby causing the overheating. In my many years of battery dissection, I've never seen the side casing of a battery being positive before! These were "Golden Power" alkaline batteries, made in China. They were the original batteries that came with the remote ( for a Shaw digital cable box). Anyone ever seen a positive case AA battery before, or is this a new ( dumb) idea?
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<snip>

oops..my mistake ..it looks like Maxell amd Ikea (made in Germany) alkaline batteries are all the same..a positive side casing. When the hell did they stop making the old negative zinc sides? Only with Alkalines? What a PITA! My apologies.
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BTW: Ikea batteries come from Varta. Better price than original Varta labeled and the technical performance is good. Duracell is better - even useable as AccuCell.
wrote:

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bart wrote:

I've seen many Alkaline batteries with the outside casing connected to the 'tit' on top as the positive and the bottom flat connector was insulated from the body of the battery. alkaline batteries have different chemistry from carbon zinc resulting in an inverted construction. This may actually be the norm, but in the larger sizes the plastic outer wrap hides the details. Just looked at a DuraCell "D" and it is of the inverted construction, but the insulation of the battery bottom (-) terminal from the case of the battery is hidden under the plastic wrapping.
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On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 16:11:20 -0400, ken scharf

Since it's the cathode that gets eaten in whichever reaction is used for the battery type, it might make sense to have the anode as the case.
I could have done with this 25 years ago when I got sent abroad for work for three of months and came back to find that the transistor radio batteries had leaked all over one of my (expensive) loudspeakers :-(
Mark Rand RTFM
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Positive can/case is standard alkaline cell construction. The correct question would be "has anyone ever seen a negative cased alkaline cell?"
wrote:

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W
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------000804030603010302090600 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Sorry, but I JUST have to ask, Are you the Bob May who was on that TV show ( in that "suit") in the late 1960's??
73
Bob May wrote:

--------------000804030603010302090600 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000"> Sorry,&nbsp; but I <b>JUST</b> have to ask,&nbsp;&nbsp; Are you the Bob May who was on that<br> TV show ( in that "suit")&nbsp; in the late 1960's??<br> <br> 73<br> <br> <br> <br> Bob May wrote:<br> <blockquote cite="midsK6dncYRL5WYtprYnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@nethere.com" type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I thought all of the carbon/zinc type batteries had negative cases. The little button on the top is the positive contact for the battery and the other end is essentially flat on most batteries today with some having a stamped bottom and sides in contact.
-- Yeppie, Bush is such an idiot that He usually outwits everybody else. How dumb!
</pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>
--------------000804030603010302090600--
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    Most did -- but the zinc/carbon individual cells are relatively rare now. An example of the zinc-carbon ones without a negative case are the ones which were used to make high voltage batteries (even the 9V ones) were a wax ring (shaped sort of like a tire) with a zinc plate at one end and carbon at the other, with the sal-ammoniac (IIRC) in between. All of the wax rings were joined end to end by melting the wax, and this connected all the cells in series.

    The "little button on the top" was a metal cap over the end of the central carbon rod which was the actual positive terminal.
    However, the Alkaline cells use a different chemistry (I'm not sure of the details -- but it could be looked up), and the positive terminal makes the case -- which requires a strange form factor to deal with all the equipment designed to orient the button properly as a positive terminal. A standard flashlight would not care, but most electronic stuff powered by batteries does care, which is why they continue to shape things so the button is positive, even if it is connected to the case. The common coin cells are different, because there were never any of those with the button as positive.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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Chemistry lesson for the day:
Be careful what you call the cathode and what you call the anode. Oxidation ALWAYS occurs at the Anode, and reduction always occurs at the cathode. The oxidation process results in a chemical losing electrons, and the reduction process results in a chemical gaining electrons. (Mnemonics: "oxidation" and "anode" both start with vowels; "reduction" and "cathode" both start with consonants. "LEO sez GER": Loss of Electrons is Oxidation. Gain of Electrons is Reduction.) In a cell delivering power, the ANODE is the NEGATIVE terminal--the electrons given up in the oxidation chemical reaction come out there. If you re-charge the cell, the roles of anode and cathode are reversed. You feed electrons into the negative terminal, and (with luck) cause a reduction reaction where the chemical at that pole picks up the electrons and is converted back to what it was when the battery was freshly charged.
Cheers, Tom
Mark Rand wrote:

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Guilty as charged (groan). It's just like my account with the bank where debits remove money instead of adding money like they should do :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
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