Moving Tree Journeyman Mill - sanity check

snipped-for-privacy@rgs.uci.edu wrote:


The truck rentals local to me won't rent a box truck if the know it will be used to move machinery (they ask). The reason given is that there are no substantial hardpoints to tie to. Hertz (around here) will rent a 18' flatbed that would hold your mill. At $150/day and $1.50/mi, plus buying chains and ratchets (that machine is too big for straps), plus renting a big fork lift, it might be pretty close to the cost of having it shipped to you. I have also moved a Hardinge mill, and I am the Lone Ranger of moving heavy objects (I prefer that no one else be in the way). At 3500 pounds, I would bite the bullet and have it placed where it was wanted. Ask the fellows for movers in your area.
Worth what it costs.
Kevin Gallimore
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You should be using properly tensioned chains fore and aft, secured to substantial eyes on the trailer. It should be secured as well as a vehicle or heavy equipment would be. You should get some advice from a local truck/trailer place that sells DOT approved chain and hardware. Make sure the rigging passes muster so you can avoid accidents or trouble with the policia.
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On 12 Apr 2005 11:05:45 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@rgs.uci.edu wrote:

Save yourself some powerful grief. I rented a diesel flatbed that had a bed about 4 feet in the air. I think it was an Isuzu. Anyway, the lathe I was moving weighed about 5000 lbs. I told the rental place what I was planning on moving and they said "no problem". After loading with a forklift and securing the lathe properly with chains and binders I took it out on an empty road and did a few panic stops and swervs. I could hardly tell the thing was there. So I drove home with it and never had to worry about rolling or spilling my load. And having a truck with the proper capacity made a huge difference. Once back at the shop I used another fork lift to unload it. Can you have a fork lift delivered to your place? It can make life so much easier. When I removed the lathe I just lifted it clear of the truck and my son drove the truck away. This way there was no fork lift travel with a load high in the air. After lowering gently I placed the lathe in the shop. And there was NEVER any time when someone was near enough to the load to be hurt if I lost the load. Remember that those straps have a HUGE capacity to absorb and release energy. If one breaks it can whip someone really hard and cause bad injuries. Be sure the straps are protected from abrason and that if one breaks everyone is out of the way of anywhere it might land. If it costs you 200 bucks extra for the lift at home maybe it's just good insurance. Sorry about the kinda rant. I live with constant pain from crushing injuries (not related to moving machines though) and it aint worth it. I know how you feel about wanting to do it all yourself, I still try to do some thing I shouldn't. But if a 3000 lb machine gets away and you are in it's way you won't even slow it up. More likely you'll just grease the skids so to speak and it'll slide further on your blood. ERS
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Thanks for the reply. I have some injuries from a motorcycle accident, and I agree that it's important to be safe. It's not worth it to hurt myself for *any* peice of equipment. And I understand that this mill would easily kill me if it fell on me. It would be a big enough problem if it just tipped over...
I don't think I can find a big pick-up truck to haul this thing on a trailer, so it looks like I'll need to find something else, and use a fork lift to unload it. I'll look into a flat bed.
Thanks for the advice.
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On 13 Apr 2005 11:02:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@rgs.uci.edu wrote:

Look into the isuzu flatbeds. A real joy to drive. Makes you feel real secure. ERS
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My son and I moved a punch press a couple of months ago. Those things are really top heavy so I strapped the press to the vertical rails of the fork truck.
He drove the fork truck outside and was just starting to lift it to put it on the truck. I told him to hold up a sec while I took the strap off. He'd already lifted the press an inch or so. Of course the vertical rail doesn't raise so the strap was quite tight. I flipped the ratchet open all the way and it let go.
Man did it let go!
Gouged my thumb. Blood splattered all over the place.
So yea Eric, they can store a surprising amount of energy.

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By the time you rent a truck, buy tie downs, pay mileage, rent a forklift, and spend the time, could you pay someone to deliver it? I'm just wondering... Is it that expensive?
I paid a rigger to deliver my mill and it cost about the same as I would have spent had I rented the stuff needed to do it myself. Of course, my mill was only 30 miles away so obviously YMMV.
Peter

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would you not be cheaper and more secure to have it shipped?? surely there is a cartage company that can handle it? Train maybe?
Doug

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snipped-for-privacy@rgs.uci.edu wrote:

Weight sounds like a journeyman 325. The machine is quite top heavy, even with the knee down as the footprint is not that large.
This unit has holes for lifting eyes at the top. To the best of my knowledge the eyes have a 1" dia thread mount. If the eyes have been removed, get some to re-install and use as tie points while moving. Also, rent a lift that can crane the unit by the eyes rather than lift from the bottom.
Personaly, I'd pay to have it moved. Although you can probably scab together a move yourself, even the slightest problem could make it such a pain that it's not worth the hassle. Around my area, there is a used equipment dealer (excavators, dozers, etc) that will load a lift on their lowboy and move stuff like this for a good price. You might see of there is similar in your area.
Koz
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replying to Koz, Ggg wrote: The thread count for my 325 Journeyman is 10tpi. I can thread a 3/4-10 bolt 1.5" in but it is loose like the diameter is too small. Coincidentally a 13/16 dia. Coarse thread is also 10 tpi. Does anybody know for sure what size the lifting holes on top of the head are? I'm having a very hard time finding any kind of 13/16-10 bolts.
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On Thu, 04 May 2017 00:18:02 GMT, Ggg

Maybe the thread is metric. 20mm x 2.5 pitch. Eric
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replying to etpm, Ggg wrote: Eric you are correct, thank you.
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replying to Ggg, Ggg wrote: The thread turned out to be metric, M20-2.50. I mistakenly ordered a 30mm long thread which looked awfully short once I saw them, but they held when the machine was lifted. I would order a 50mm long for a piece of mind if I were to do it again.
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