N2 cylinder

A friend just dropped off a small cylinder full of nitrogen that he had no idea
what to do with. I've been trying to figure what I am going to do with it.
Ya'll have any ideas what nitrogen would be good for in a home shop?
Reply to
GMasterman
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Handy to flood a fuel tank with if you are going to weld it. If you are into rebuilding or making gas shocks, it's just the ticket.
Jim ovar Vulcan. Mi
Reply to
Jim Kovar
G Masterman wrote: (clip) Ya'll have any ideas what nitrogen would be good for in a home shop? ^^^^^^^^^^^ I vaguely recall that it is used as a shielding gas for welding bronze. Do you ever have to do that?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GMasterman) wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@mb-m25.aol.com:
Portable compressed air.
--Glenn Lyford
Reply to
Glenn Lyford
Use it to purge the air in paint cans. Might be better than the O2/N2 mix we breath
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GMasterman) wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@mb-m25.aol.com:
You can use it for chilling press-fit bushings before assembly also.
Reply to
Anthony
No you can't. It's a compressed gas, not liquid nitrogen.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
The compressed Nitrogen in that cylinder is bone-dry, meaning it's perfect for a Plasma Cutter source gas without fussing with compressors and air driers, and will make the cutting tips last longer. Also good for airbrushes, if you are shooting moisture sensitive paints.
Air Conditioning repairmen use small Nitrogen cylinders for purging the refrigeration lines, and a pressure source for testing the system for leaks, so they don't introduce any moisture that has to be vacuumed out later before the final refrigerant charge. Also good for portable air power to blow out clogged condensate drain lines. (You could use anything, but you already have the N2 on the truck.)
Power and phone companies use it for pressurizing cables to keep the water out, without running remote compressor/driers.
No, that would be Liquid Nitrogen, an entirely different beast. And it's cheaper and easier to use a 3-pound coffee can and a CO2 fire extinguisher for shrinking stuff like that.
Just put the bearings in the can, put the horn in the can, and give it a good blast. Instant Powdered Dry Ice. (And nifty fog FX, too.)
NOTE: ALWAYS have another full and sealed extinguisher around the shop in case things catch fire.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Pressurising Guinness or Boddington's :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
BzZzZzZzZzT! Wrong! ;-) You use CO2 for the beer tapper.
You can use N2 for purging wine bottles for temporary storage, though. Purging the air before you put the cork back in keeps the contents from oxidizing as fast.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
You will find that the two beverages I referred to are actually pressurised with nitrogen, not CO2. When poured it comes out of the beer in much smaller bubbles and gives a thick creamy head. It also does not acidify the beer as CO2 does.
Regards
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
BzZzZzZzZzT! Wrong!
you use CO2 to carbonate and pour many beers, but not Boddingtons or Guinness.
Guinness and Boddingtons are served using "beer gas". A mix of Nitrogen and CO2. The bit of CO2 is used to maintain the low level of carbonation, and the Nitrogen is used for the higher pressure needed to push the beer through a highly resistive tap called a creamer faucet, without dissolving in the beer....if sufficient pressure of *only* CO2 was used to pour these style of beers, it'd come out a fizzy, bubbly mess, and not the very smooth drink it is.
Guess what my other hobby is.... :o)
Cheers, Paul
Reply to
Paul Keating
Huh? Wazzat? That doesn't make any sense at all... The bubbles in every American beer I've ever heard of (and the several beer tappers I've personally maintained) are (mostly) naturally generated carbonation, and CO2 is added to dispense it, fill the ullage space in the keg, and keep the remaining contents properly fresh and bubbly...
Well, with a proper explanation of how and why they do it, that actually /does/ makes sense... Well, about as much as anything else Britain does... ;-P
But how do you meter the ratio, CO2 and N2 having entirely different characters? Two cylinders, two regulators, and a metering mixer of some sort, or...?
N2 is pressurized, and CO2 is liquified, so I doubt a mix in a cylinder would magically come out at a constant and proper ratio - but I've been wrong before. (And C25 Argon/CO2 mix for MIG welding works from one cylinder somehow.) Edumacate me. (sic) ;-)
Barkeep at the Lucas Electric Lighting Works (and a frequent purchaser of large quantities of candles)? ;-P
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
to a point....at the end of fermentation, the beer has some CO2 in solution. The beer is then force carbonated in a pressurized tank with compressed CO2. After carbonation is adjusted to the desired volumes of CO2 per unit of beer, for a desired serving temperature, it is kegged or bottled. In the US, practically every kegged mega beer (Bud, Miller, Coors, etc) is force carbonated. The few naturally carbonated beers you'll find in kegs are from specialty micro breweries producing what is commonly referred to as "real ale" or cask conditioned ale. Sometimes bottled beers, particularly Belgian style ales are bottled "on lees", meaning with yeast in the bottle... to produce natural carbonation. Kind of like bottled home brew.
Basically to prevent the beer from becoming stale, or oxidized. You could just as easily do this with N2. In some bars, they keep all the kegs in a cold room, and have LONG lines running to taps, so they have to use N2, because at the pressures required to push the beer that distance, it would become overcarbonated....and the barkeep would pour pint after pint of foam.
Not "just" a British thing...Like I said above...bars on the Western side of the pond use N2 to push beer down LONG lines.
Beer gas is premix in a single cylinder. I use straight CO2 for my kegs, so I don't know much about the mix, etc.
Homebrewer (in Canada) with several SS beer kegs for kegging and force carbonating my beer. Make wort (unfermented beer) ferment a couple days, siphon into keg. Crank the CO2 reg up to 50PSI overnight, drop to 12PSI, chill and serve.
MMmmm....Beer................
Paul
Reply to
Paul Keating
And watch the bubbles go DOWN instead of up. That is funny
Reply to
Fh
Apparently he's never seen beer bubbles go down
Reply to
Fh
It's part of the fascination of it.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand

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