Naming lathe parts

Hi!
Has anybody got a link to a site where there is a picture of a lathe with the parts named in english? I just know some (spindle, tool rest, bed, ...) but I need more (mainly
of the moveable parts holding the tool). A understandable verbal description would help to.
Thanks for your help!
Nick
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I'd offer a scan of the manual that came with my Chinese wonder, but only for comic relief! Any manual that refers to the lathe operator as "the jockey" wouldn't be too useful for your purposes.
Tom
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I have kept a manual of one of the first PC-keyboards of an XT-clone from Taiwan. The german translation is an incredible nonsense. They translated it from their bad english. Imagine that with your "jockey".
I remember, that they translated "cursor" to something saying "curl pusher" (whatever that is on a PC).
Nick
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On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 23:58:52 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Mller) wrote:

I thought "cursor" was someone who used bad language.
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wrote:

<Snip>
Apparently, my rotary table has something called a "shaking shank".
Steve R.
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    Could that be a pivoted worm gear, which can be disengaged from the main gear on the table? Some are pivoted, some are mounted on an eccentric to engage and disengage.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    You are expected to use the reins, instead. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Nick Mller wrote:

http://www-me.mit.edu/lectures/machinetools/lathe/intro.html
http://www.efunda.com/processes/machining/turn_engine_lathe.cfm
Video http://www.jjjtrain.com/vms/lathe_functions.html#2
Backspace any of the above URLs for a wealth of machining basic info
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At least this one is exactly what I wanted! Great!
Haven't yet checked the other ones, but I guess they also give me names. ;-)
Thanks a lot, Nick
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    Be aware that there are variations in the terms, depending.
    For example, the "chip pan" is sometimes called the "chip tray".
    Also -- that particular image is of a gear driven lathe, so it does not cover the details under the headstock, such as the "cone pulley" (multiple step pulley around the spindle), and the back gears. Also, the bull gear (in front of the cone pulley) and the pin which locks the bull gear to the cone pulley.

    The other sites may fill in some of the gaps left by this one, but I also have not looked at them yet.
    But things like a "bed turret" on a lathe in place of the tailstock hit some problems when discussing them between the UK and the US. In the UK, I believe that is called a "capstan", while the ones in which the turret is power driven and a permanent part of the lathe are called "turret lathes". (I may have this backwards, as I am posting from the US -- but I have hit the confusion before. Whichever it is, I have what my manufacturer (Clausing) called a "bed turret". :-)
    Best of luck,         DoN.
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Yes, I'm aware of the differences. But the parts I need are named the same. And I don't need to go in details (under the hood).
Nick
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