lathe classifications -- whats a chucker

How does a "chucker" lathe differ from other types?
I know about turret lathes, engine lathes, toolroom lathes...
I've tried to tell from pictures and references on the net,
but I still don't really know what a "chucker" is used for.
Reply to
Mike Berger
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The ones I remember being called "Chuckers" were like scaled up "swiss automatic" lathes which, once set up, would create and part off an entire turned/threaded piece without operator assistance, other than shoving a new bar of stock into the back end of the spindle when needed. I think I've seen ones which even did that stock replenishing by themselves.
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
A chucker is a "second op" production machine. Used to finish parts started on bigger machines by doing such jobs as internal and external threads etc. Made obsolete by cnc machines. 73 Gary N9ZSV
Reply to
Gary
A chucker is a production machine. It may have multiple spindles. It has a number of different tool holders and attachments that allows it to make many different, complex parts. For example: bar stock is loaded, pushed out to desired length, faced, and cut down to two different diameters. Then a ball turner is applied to round off the middle, followed by drilling through with several steps, o-ring grooves, and then cut off. It is like a screw machine writ large. It is called a chucker because it typically feeds bar stock through the spindle into a chuck.
Boris
Reply to
Boris Beizer
Mike Berger wrote in news:dre5j4$k4u$4 @roundup.shout.net:
Hehe..what wild explinations in this thread. Simply put Mike, a "chucker" is a lathe that has no tailstock. These are normally production machines meant to run short-length parts, or collet equiped machines.
Reply to
Anthony
If you haven't figured it out yet, you're not going to get a straight answer . Chuckers can be single or multi-spindle, manual or automatic, horizontal or vertical, big or little, pink or blue. I'd say the only thing that all chuckers have in common is that semi-finished parts are loaded singly (i.e., no bar feed), and there's some sort of tool changer, or multiple tool stations in the case of a multi-spindle machine.
In it's simplest manual form, I'm not sure where you'd draw the line between a chucker and a turret lathe with no bar feed. I've owned both a J&L saddle type turret lathe and a chucker similar to a Hardinge HC. Except for the fact that the turret lathe must have weighed 15000 pounds, and the chucker perhaps 1500, it'd be difficult to draw a distinction between them.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Every lathe is a chucker...just leave the key in and turn it on.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
How many chuck keys can a lathe chuck chuck when a lathe chuck chucks keys?
Reply to
Wayne
Yeah, most of them are Hardinge's, and the goddamm price *never* goes down! Very nice to work on.
Often have handle-actuated turrets, sometimes a separate parting attachment, and nice motorized powerfeed in x,y, continuously variable spindle speed, coolant, you name it.... And inlaid *ivory* on the goddamm handles!! No foolin....
Proly you could put a live center in the turret, using it as a tail stock if you had to. iirc, the beds weren't *that* short, and you could turn a shaft mebbe 18" long or so.
For small parts (or at least some of the ops), proly the only way to go, short of very expensive/sophisticated CNC, and then sometimes not even then....
There's a shop in LI that has I think nearly a hundred of these chuckers, does excellent work, usually ahead of deadline, if you can bleeve dat.... -- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
If memory serves me correctly, a Warner & Swasey 2S was defined as a "chucker". I programmed same for a few months, and it was equipped with a bar feeder. Had a 6-station tool turret. Basically any job that could be fit into it's working envolope was possible, whether starting from raw stock or follow up operations.
Reply to
Ace
If you put a piece of wood in a chucker do you get a wood chucker?
John
Reply to
John
Just remember, in a couple of weeks it will be ground hog day here in Punxsutawney pa.
John
Reply to
John
Two demerits, and no dessert for a week...
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
| | If you put a piece of wood in a chucker do you get a wood chucker?
If a wood chucker can chuck wood, what kind of wood could a wood chucker chuck?
Sorry, I couldn't resist! :)
Reply to
carl mciver
Keep Gunner out of there. He has a lot of scoped rifles and knows where to find recipes for groundhog.
Oh, and give Phil my regards.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
If it's mounted vertically, do you have a up-chucker?
Reply to
Don Foreman
If it's mounted vertically you get a "vertical-up-chucker."
If it's and automatic you get a "auto-vertical-up-chucker"
If it's a semi-auto, Mike Berger wants it banned.
Reply to
Mike
Very good, but shouldn't it be...
How many keys can a lathe chuck chuck when a lathe chuck chucks chuck keys?
Shucks. Makes a bloke want to chuckle. Yuck yuck yuck.
PS. I'm not Chuck. (He IS my brother, though.)
Hmmm...
How many keys can Chuck leave in a lathe chuck before the chuck chucks a key into Chuck?
Reply to
xray
One period in a polo match, aka chukka. Ducking, Tom
Reply to
Tom Wait

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