Craigslist - South Bend Lathe 9 - $895 (Belleview)

http://ocala.craigslist.org/tls/1922861701.html

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wrote:

right, & they should have the same health care as use & so on. To put it as basic as possible, how ever lifestyle is of their least fortunate constituents are , should be same as theirs. Salary, housing, everything! Thats the ONLY way change can happen. Government / Economic problems start a the bottom & go up. Top down does not work, (except in solid moldeling.)
South Bend lathe! I think I read that book in HS. "How to run a lathe".......... come to think of it they had S.Bends in HS machine shop. Nice American made machines at one time, although I'm partial to good'ol Logans with quick change gear box's & a taper attachment. later on Sheldons-
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wrote:

South Bend lathe! I think I read that book in HS. "How to run a lathe".......... come to think of it they had S.Bends in HS machine shop. Nice American made machines at one time, although I'm partial to good'ol Logans with quick change gear box's & a taper attachment. later on Sheldons-
South Bend 9" or Logan 9", what is the difference given that they have the same features? And Sheldon looks just like another South Bend clone.
But that's just my opinion :-)
Oh by the way I
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Uffe Brentsen do have a SB 9" in my shop :-)





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wrote:

Ya they are both manual engine lathes- same features

not really using, & just looking at each of the specific models they all look like clones of each other. But, when it comes to doing/operation ergonomics(if that exsited then) I like the Logan- Slightly less heavy duty but very versital with the quick change gear box(threading & different feed selection. Flip a lever - cross slide nut disengages for free movement - set bar & lock cross slide to it & wahla! I sure all the old lathes had those attachments, but around chi-town where Logans were made- a bit more popular & common with all those features- Almost a gaint Jewelers lathe IMHO. A "toolroom" lathe. The S/B's were bigger production kinda clumsy work horses. Once set up with proper gearing PITA opening up the case & matching the gears - you'd go to town.
Now we have MoriSeki's (the Cadillac) with live tooling for light duty side drilling/milling - subspinde(tailstock) - of corse hyd foot operated chucks & tailstocks They are like giant Swiss machines. saweeet let me tell you. But for 500k (tooled) they better be.

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If the Mori is a cadillac, what is an Okuma?
Wes
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wrote:

A Buick. Roughly.
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Wes wrote:

A Nakamura Tomi is a Cadillac. An Index is a Cadillac. A Mori is a decent machine but then so are Okuma's. Mori and Okuma are very similar in terms of quality and are at par with Yamazaki Mazak.
Really high quality turning equipment, including CNC Swiss, comes from either Germany or Japan. Junk, in all flavors, is what the Koreans and Taiwanese pass off as machine tools. AFAIK, there is only one Korean turning machine builder in the Okuma class and that is Hwacheon. There aren't any Taiwanese at or above this level. HAAS has both the Korean's and Taiwanese beat.
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wrote:

Aack! Stripped down to the bed, a Mazak looks like a plucked chicken. I've seen them naked. <g> I'll agree with you about Nakamuras, but having been in the lathe business (full disclosure -- I was Marketing Manager in the US for Wasino), I'd give the edge to Mori over Okuma.

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Ed Huntress wrote:

You haven't seen one in a while then. I'm somewhat more familiar with the Mazak milling line. A Mazak 510 will hold tenths all day long and they are built like brick shit houses. Relatively speaking anyway. They aren't Yasada's or Toyoda's but they are half or less the price. A good "Buick" class Japanese milling machine is an OKK. That's by my own standard anyway, and an OKK isn't something to turn your nose up at.
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wrote:

I don't think I've ever seen a stripped Mazak machining center. But I saw a Mazak lathe next to a Wasino LG, both stripped, and it was like looking at the 98-pound weakling next to a little brick outhouse.
Not to knock Mazaks. They do their job very well. When GM contracted for the machines for the GM-Shanghai plant, they specified (informally) "Japanese-type machines." One of their purchasing agents told me they were referring to Mazaks. The idea was that they were going to be replacing machines every 3 years or less, and they weren't going to pay for anything that would last longer under production conditions. That was their job, and that's the way much production machinery is spec'd and built today for world-class, high-volume production plants.
You may know, for example, the US-built Lamb machines that the US auto industry was used to in those days. Those really ARE brick shithouses. You can't kill them. But they cost close to $1 million or so, and they're dinosaurs in the world of lean manufacturing.
That's a whole different world from most jobbing, except for auto-industry parts jobbing, which also is a three-shifts, foot-to-the-floor business.
FWIW, when I started with Wasino, I asked what their long-term marketing issues were. The first thing I was told was that there was no replacement market. The machines go on for years -- even decades (that was mostly their gang-tooled LGs). So a few years later, when I was writing stories for them, I found one that had been running three shifts/day for, I think, 11 years, without a breakdown and with very light maintenance, turning cast iron. When I shot photos of it, I had to sweep away the piles of chips just to see the machine.
There are some jobbers who want machines like that, but the closer they are to being auto-industry insiders, getting the big contracts and really working closely with the OEMs, the more likely they are to buy machines for a specific, fairly short lifetime. One extreme example was a big jobber that specified its machines were not to be painted. They wanted a discount for no paint. They said the machines would be replaced before they rusted out.

Again, I have mostly third-hand experience with milling. I never worked for a milling machine company, and my direct experience with them is very light.
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Ed Huntress



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Ed Huntress wrote:

Well, Ed, I have.

Knocking MAZAK is like dissing the Mafia.

MAZAK is the properly capitalized machine people start out with.
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John R. Carroll




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Weeeeeeeeeeeeellll leme tellya the Okuma - Mori story- Readers Digest version
squealing tools a newer P100 Okuma Captain (who knows the machines past) moved idential program- part & tooling to a new Mori - no squeal faster cycle time = much more solid machine of the same stature & size - slant bed live tooling & sub spindle. like I said saweeeeeeeeeeeet machine.
When the part hits the side thats & it make me fly thats the Mori - ( when the moon hits the sky like a big pizza pie)
so Okuma = Buick agreed

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~g~


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My Sheldon lathe - a L 11-44 chrome ways (Big gloat) is the one I and Dad bought in 1952. Have the sales receipt and even located the salesman who is retired. We bought it at a big hardware store - basement machine sales. It has had lite use and is in good to great condition for the age. It needs a paint job. Fifty years of moving vans and storage around the country is tough on the paint.
Have the tools that I've increased and remember how to use it but It has been mine for ten years or so.
Lathes all took on a similar look around the time of WW II. Demands for volume and needs likely made a lot of them take on a similar spec; and need. I suspect Scott might have some input knowledge on the subject. "War stories from his family" of sorts.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 8/29/2010 4:04 AM, Uffe Brentsen wrote:

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