South Bend 9x32 lathe


I'm looking at a lathe, a South Bend 9x32. I haven't gone to see it in
person yet; the seller estimates it is from "the 40s", no model information
on it, but here is a picture:
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When I asked the seller if it came with the change gears, he replied that it
"... comes with complete gearing - it's not quick change."
However, that looks a lot like the first lathe on this page, which appears
to require change gears:
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So does this one require change gears, or is there a transmission in there
somewhere to change the speed for turning and/or threading?
Also, myself knowing little about lathes, what desirable features would a
simple lathe like this not have (besides power cross feed, which seller
stated it didn't have)?
Thanks,
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
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I read what you wrote to mean that the seller has and will give you all the change gears that the lathe needs. The transmission on a Model A is the curved box with two levers and an instruction plate mounted over the left-end base, the place where the drum switch is mounted in the photo of the Model C.
This has the threading chart for the Model B and C.
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text lists the gear set sizes.
The "stud gear" is on the outer end of the stud that holds the swinging plate which selects forward, reverse or off. The "screw gear" is the gear attached to the end of the leadscrew. When the chart shows 18 and 72 tooth gears on the same pivot they are attached together and rotate at the same speed, making a 4:1 reduction.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
What kind of work do you intend to do on it? I have a Heavy 10 from the mid 50's. With the disclaimer that I may not be getting 100% out of it, I can't imagine working with a much smaller or less powerful lathe.
Reply to
ATP*
That was why I asked him, but my read on his response was that he doesn't believe it needs them. My homework made me think it does need change gears, and I thank you for verifying that for me.
I would ask him again, but electronic communication seems to be very difficult with him, so I might have to go and see it in person.
I did notice some change gears on Ebay; a quick look gives me that idea that they seem to be about $100 for a set.
Thanks Jim, I appreciate it. Just out of curiosity, how much would you expect to pay for something like this, assuming it isn't too terribly worn, but without any change gears? (assuming I'm not an Iggy or Gunner) :)
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
When the seller said "comes with gearing, is not quick change" that means change gears - A box or rack of gears that you need to change - ie, take a wrench, remove this gear, add that gear, get this feed or thread. There's usually a chart to tell you which gears to use where.
Quick change involve gears that you can "quickly change" between by using a lever system. No box or rack of separate gears. No wrench.
As for changing the speed of the headstock, you move the flat belt to different pulleys. Has nothing to do with the gearing, other than the back gears.
You might want to drop $12 or so on "How to Run a Lathe" (perhaps cheaper if you can find a copy that doesn't need to be shipped to you).
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So long as the work fits and you are not trying to run production, you can get a lot done on a 9" - but you might yearn for power cross feed. However, not having it will make you learn to turn the dials smoothly. Depends on how much facing you'll be doing, and how much you'll mind having to hand-feed.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
I don't see any on the local Craigslist for the past few months, and the second-hand machinery dealer I visited this afternoon has no metal lathes, so I don't know the current market.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
This appears to be a loose change gear lathe, you MUST get a stack of 8 or 9 gears as part of the tooling that comes with the lathe.
I'm not a SB lathe user, not sure if this comes with babbit or ball bearing headstock, looks like a babbit set up, someone else will need to chime in. A ball bearing headstock will have the spindle sticking out of a 4" or so diameter casting, a babbit version will be half that.
A worn babbit setup for a newbie is disaster. Nothing but grief. You should be able to put a pry bar under the chuck and lift up, get no more than .001" or so. Any more and either pass on it or plan on learning how to repair things.
Around here a Logan or SB setup in moderate shape is low hundreds ($200 to $400) as a fair price. Figure almost double that by the time you replace a headstock bearing, add in a nice toolpost, some boring bars from Enco, and a nice collection of tool bits.
J>> I read what you wrote to mean that the seller has and will give you
Reply to
RoyJ
Ahh, okay, I get it now. I should have known that (I think I got too excited seeing an old lathe locally).
Thanks!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Cool, thanks Roy. If I go look at it, maybe I should bring my mag base and indicator to see how much the chuck wiggles around. I'll try to figure out the difference between babbiit and bearings.
This one in particular, the fellow is asking $650. I don't know how much of that is what he expects it to be worth, and how much of that is wiggle room. He did say it doesn't look like it has been used much (I don't think he has used it much, if at all, himself), but I've heard that song before....
Thanks again,
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
I guessed $700 for the asking price and considered writing a range of $200 to $1200. I only see what's on the tags, not what the buyers actually paid.
What's the condition of the 3 and 4 jaw chucks? New chucks cost me nearly as much as the lathe and the steady rest was another $100. Does it have a tool post?
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I picked up a lathe from work (brand not important)that had been used in the weld shop to turn parts for weld fixtures. Babbit head, about .020" play. Piece of trash, sold it as soon as I could. Later bought a mid 40's Logan 200 for $300 replaced the headstock bearing, new 3 jaw chuck, Chinese quick change post, a decent drill chuck for the tail stock, and a nice collection of tool bits for another $300 or so. It's not as heavy duty as the big ones at work but it's really nice to do a quick part or two late at night.
$650 is a preminum price for one with loose change gears and no tooling. I say no tooling since there isn't even a tool post on the crossfeed. The pic shows a 3 jaw chuck sitting on the dolly, the Logan I mentioned came with a very trashed out 3 jaw, scroll was badly worn, .020" runnout depending on what size piece you chucked up.
J>> This appears to be a loose change gear lathe, you MUST get a stack of
Reply to
RoyJ
The page you mentioned:
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a babbit head with loose change gears and no power feed as the first picture. The second picture has the quick change gear box at the lower left of the bed. It also has the power cross feed: there is a selector lever with 3 positions on the side of the carriage. Print out a copy of that page when you go look at it.
J>> When the seller said "comes with gearing, is not quick change" that
Reply to
RoyJ
Thanks Jim. I will have to see the condition of the chucks. It does come with a steady rest, and he told me comes with tool post and tool holders.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Thanks Roy. I looked at some pictures last night, and if I am correct, the babbitt type has a top held on by two screws, like the way a crankshaft is held in it's journal. I'll look for that.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Thanks Roy. I'll have to see if it comes with the gears or not; no gears is really going to drop the price down on this one.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
This Army manual is little more than a reprint of South Bend's:
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Maintenance and adjustment instructions are scattered throughout it.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
It more than likely comes with the 'lantern' style tool post with a left, right, and straight holder. It's a start but you would really like a quick change:
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$100 on sale.
The steady rest is a very nice addition but rarely used. One of those "when you need it ya gotta have it things"
J>> I guessed $700 for the asking price and considered writing a range of
Reply to
RoyJ
Roy,
The "Workshop" series of lathes have hard steel spindles in cast iron (the headstock itself) bearings. They last for decades.
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Ooooh, thanks Jim, that one's a keeper!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Awesome, thanks Roy, I appreciate it.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken

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