Need a bacteriocide for oil

Diesel folks, I took apart the apron on a used lathe I bought and the sump had gobs and gobs of gobs of gelled oil. Even though the sump in the apron is
not supposed to get any water in it I'm sure some gets in from condensdation and maybe coolant leaking in somewhere. So this tiny amount of water must be enough for the type of bacteria that eats oils to live fairly well. I have washed out the sump with solvent but I'm thinking that any bacteria that can eat way lube will probably like stoddard solvent too. Will the bacteriocide used in diesel burning machines and oil burning furnaces kill the bacteria in my machine sump? I'd like to just rinse the sump with bacteriocide laden diesel oil, drain, dry, and then fill with way lube. Anybody think this would prevent the rapid regrowth of the gel? Thanks, Eric P.S. Why is it called way lube? Is it just because it is so good? I mean it's not just lube, it's WAY lube. Just askin'
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    [ ... ]

    It is called "way lube", because it is made to lubricate the sliding *ways*. At least my lathe (Clausing 12x24") requires a different (and much thinner) oil in the apron. Double check the manual for that lathe (if you can find one.)
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

Every lathe I have requires a hydraulic / gear oil for gearboxes and apron. Way lube is only for the sliding ways.
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wrote:

I have run several lathes that use the same oil in the apron gearbox as on the ways. And they have all specified way lube of one type or another. Eric
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snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Well, mine call for very different oils. One calls for DTE24 hydraulic/gear oil for the gearboxes and apron, and 68 way lube on the ways. My other two call for similar.
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wrote:

The reason some lathes use way oil in the apron is because the apron serves as the reservoir for the way lube. There is a pump in the apron that pumps oil to the ways. Eric
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wrote:

Don, I was making a joke. I guess it didn't go over too well. I better not try stand up comedy. The apron also has the lube pump for the ways. And it says right on the apron to use Shell Tonna 33 for which Mobil Vactra 22 is an equivalent. And Vactra 22 is way lube. Eric
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    Sorry. I tend to treat every question here (except from obvious trolls) as serious -- and typing with a broken arm slows my humor detector.
    Besides -- for a newbie reading your question, if not for you.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 11/9/2014 6:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

It is very sticky and sticks to the Ways lubing and protecting the ways. It will stick on heavy pressure and vertical surfaces.
Martin
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On Sunday, November 9, 2014 7:31:52 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

I would rinse the sump with bateriocide diesel and not bother to dry the sump. Diesel has a little lubricating properties and a little diesel should not be a problem.
Dan
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On Mon, 10 Nov 2014 05:08:02 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

You are probably right Dan. I'm just wondering if it will be effective or if I should just refill with new oil. If I had an oven big enough I would just bake the thing at 180 degrees for a few hours and be done with it. ERic
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On Monday, November 10, 2014 12:10:45 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

A long time ago, I read something about Houghton selling a oil with some i odine added. I don't think it was cutting oil, I think it was to lubricate stainless against stainless. So I rummaged around on the internet and fou nd a patent of two about using iodine as a biostat and also improving the p erformance of a cutting oil. I also found references that said that iodine is very corrosive to some metals.
So I would probably buy some biostat rather than trying a do it yourself so lution.
Dan
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Yes, although my guess is the gel is likely due to the petroleum molecules reverting back into longer chains over a long peiod of time, and or evaporation of the lighter fractions. If the problem is indeed bacterial, I would soak overnight, bacteriocides generally need to be in contact with the target organism for some period of time to be fully effective.

It's a throwback to early ship building, ships are still commonly launched under gravty, down wooden "ways". Early machine tools were of similar construction, greased wood beams. Oftentimes the matinging wooden blocks were lined with thin metallic strips in order to reduce friction.
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On Sunday, November 9, 2014 4:31:52 PM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

The bacteria that eat oil are usually anaerobic; oxygen kills 'em. It could be a LOT of things. Best plan, is just to remove anything in the sump that comes out in a slotted spoon, and unclog any filters. In the old days, one might some carburetor cleaner to the oil and circulate it to do a 'clean-out', but that's VERY BAD unless your ventilation is top-notch.
Naturally, if you dislike the look, or history-mystery of the lube, it's time to recycle it and maybe pay attention to the filter/pump/manifold/pipes
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