Need help in removing drill chuck from Sears Reversible Variable Speed Hand Drill

Hi, I have the said drill in fairly good condition, except that the run-out of the chuck was terrible. Lately, I have acquired a Sears Rotary Tool Stand. When I
clamped the Tool Chuck (which was quite good visually) to the Drill Chuck, the run-out of the hand drill was so bad, that the whole thing shakes! I want to disassemble the Hand Drill chuck and see if I can do anything to improve it. Any suggestion?
Tony
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On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 23:20:29 -0800, Tony wrote

Open the chuck as wide as it goes. Look in, there should be a screw head visible. The end of the motor shaft is tapped and threaded for this screw and it MAY be left-handed threads. Once this screw is removed you can unscrew the chuck from the drill. It should be right-hand thread.
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You may also need to stick an allen key in the chuck (closed as if it were a drill bit) and smack the allen key's "leg" with a quick blow of a hammer, etc to get those threads to loosten up... Don't go wild though. If it doesn't come loose, figure o0ut what your time is worth and consider replacing the whole unit with something more appropriate for the work being done.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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Yes, I saw the screw-head. Unfortunately I do not have a 3/8" (or tad narrower) straight-across driver blade that I can stick into the hole and turn it. I tried it with a 1/4" blade but it won't budge a bit. Oh, well. Anyway, my time does not cost me anything (retired :-), and I want to have a reasonable tool ready just in case I get a call to work on something in a friend's house. Sure I do not want to bring my 5-speed drill press along, and most work involves drilling on the wall. Any suggestion as to what brand to buy in the same price range (about $40), that are geared with good torque, variable speed and reversible?
Thanks Tony
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wrote:

In all probability, this is a left hand thread.

Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Yes, the screw is a Left-hand thread! There is also a small hole about 3/16" in the casting along the drill shaft, that a nail can be put in to lock the drill shalf for chuck removal. Now I got the Craftman chuck out, and I happened to have a cheapie 1-speed Harbour Freight 3/8'" drill laying around. I switched the HF chuck into the Craftman drill, and the runout is greatly improved, to the point that I can use the Craftman drill in the drill press stand. Thanks to everyone, including Gunner and Bugs for the sarcastic comments. Seriously, if I want to have a "geared" (for torque) multi-speed reversible hand drill, what would the group recommend?
Tony
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On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 18:07:44 -0800, Tony wrote

In the Nov/Dec 2001 issue of Home Shop Machinist there is a good article on overhauling a Jacobs chuck you might find interesting and useful.
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------020306080606010509040602 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Another article on overhauling a Jacobs chuck at http://www.beautifuliron.com/jacobs.htm

--------------020306080606010509040602 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000"> <br> <br> Another article on overhauling a Jacobs chuck at <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.beautifuliron.com/jacobs.htm">http://www.beautifuliron.com/jacobs.htm</a><o:p></o:p> <!----><br> <blockquote cite=" snipped-for-privacy@nntp.velocitus.net" type="cite"> <pre wrap="">In the Nov/Dec 2001 issue of Home Shop Machinist there is a good article on overhauling a Jacobs chuck you might find interesting and useful.
</pre> </blockquote> </body> </html>
--------------020306080606010509040602--
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wrote:

I've got a Ryobi TorqueForce 220 (TFD220VR). It's just a 12 volt job, but it has dual range gearing. 0-400 and 0-1300 RPM
I also have 2 Craftsman Proffessional drills - 0-600 RPM, 12 volt and 13.2. The craftsman controller seams to provide more torque at low speeds than the Ryobi, but then again the Craftsman I am looking at right now and comparing is the 13.2. The 12 volt one isn't here at the moment.
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On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 23:03:42 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

So it has higher torque at the lower RPMs by having a "stronger" gear ratio, is it correct? Is the runout acceptable?

Anyone has tried the HF 18V variable speed cordless drill (Drill Master)? It was on sale at our local store for 16.99 (yes, no typo), but I did not get one. It is 0-900 rpm and has 16 torque settings. Question: How is the torque setting being "set"? Is it that they just limit the maximum current that can be drawn? I thought that everyone would love to set it at the maximum torque, No???
Inquiring mind wants to know! Tony
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Tony wrote:

That would refer to the slip clutch, most likely--you set it low when screwing drywall so it doesn't go through and highest for drilling. "Torque" is an improper term for this, but would correctly apply to the hi-low switch which gives two gear ranges.
Ken Grunke
--
take da "ma" offa dot com fer eemayl

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wrote:

It wasnt meant to be a sarcastic comment. In 6 months, post to the group how well this kludge works. I had one of those lashups and hated it from the first time I used it.
Shrug..time will tell
Gunner
"Gunner, you are the same ridiculous liberal f--k you ever where." Scipio < snipped-for-privacy@actd.net
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Gunner, I don't like the kludge drill press stand either, but it is the less of the two evils - either I do not have a portable drill press, or I have a kludgy one, when a friend calls me to his home for minor things. At home in my garage I have a 5-speed bench-top, so it is OK. While I am still looking for a better hand drill, I am glad that I went through this chuck removal thing - nothing is better than learning from hands-on experience. Thanks
Tony
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wrote:

Of course. I keep one of the little 3/8" Chinese/Harbor Freight drill presses on hand for portable needs. Its light enough and short enough (bench model) that I can simply carry it out to the welding bench etc etc. Ive got several good drill presses and of course the mills, shrug. Its nice to be able to drill a straight hole. I can freehand pretty true, but having something that I can clamp work into thats right on the work area is nice.
Respects
Gunner "At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child - miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosphy of sniveling brats." -- P.J. O'Rourke
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wrote:

Yep, easy fix for that.
Clean off a spot on your workbench. Wipe down your drill carefully with WD-40 and set it aside in a secure area.
Place the Sears Rotary Tool Stand in a suitable box.
Install an inexpensive drill press on the now cleared spot on your bench.
Place the box containing the Sears Rotary Tool Stand in the dumpster.
All better now.
Gunner
"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child - miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosphy of sniveling brats." -- P.J. O'Rourke
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You forgot about sending it to the foundry first . . . . to get a brass handle fitted so you have something to hang onto when you dump it. Bugs
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