New HP Calculator Release

Hot off the press...
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Erik
Reply to
Erik
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you know, I've still got my original HP 35 calculator. stuffed battery, bung digit in the display and all.
I wonder if these are much of an improvement on the original?
Stealth Pilot
Reply to
Stealth Pilot
I wish they would quit changing the location of the "ENTER" key ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick
Probably studied Microsofts marketing strategy.
Reply to
Wes
Actually looking at the pic I think they finally came to there senses and put it back where it belongs. I think I like keys on it better than the 32s II which was a really good pocket calculator.
I absolutely hate the 33s. Bad keys (have to watch to make sure it takes the press), lousy layout, wrong size, etc.
I still think that the 32s II was the best general purpose pocket sized calculator they've made. If they'd just constructed it better. Mine here by the computer is going flaky again. I'm going to have to take it apart and clean the contacts on the flexible strip again (and they didn't exactly make it to be taken apart).
Doesn't look like they're selling in the US yet.
Reply to
Wayne Cook
I'm stickin' with my 15c. Now worth about 3X what I paid for it.
I do wish they'd rerelease it in a CMOS version.
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Would you say more about that procedure, please? Photos in the dropbox would also be greatly appreciated. I have two 32SII's both flakey.
Reply to
Don Foreman
The LCD displays are usually connected to the PC board with "Zebra Strips", which are alternating layers of conductive and non conductive rubber. The surface deteriorates with time, so you remove them and clean the ends, as well as the PC board and display with pure Isopropyl alcohol on a Q-tip.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I'm familiar with Z-strip. The LCD displays in my calculators work fine, the problem is flakey keyboards.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Are they the crappy steel snap disks?
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
No. The keyboard signals go through the Z strip.
Reply to
Wayne Cook
If I get time to do the job I'll take pics. The main difficulty is removing the keyboard cover without tearing it up. You'll have to pry it up so that you can get to the melted posts through holes connection that is between the 2nd and 3rd key rows from the bottom. The rest is easy to figure out for someone like you.
Reply to
Wayne Cook
I don't see any advantage over the 50g.
Reply to
ATP*
At least the location on this one is a lot closer to the older models my hands are trained to use. I'm forever miskeying stuff on an HP33s. Looks like the decimal point symbol is a lot easier to see on the new 35s is a lot easier to see on the 33s as well.
Mike
Reply to
Mike Henry
CMOS not NMOS. NiAH not NiCAD. Solver - nice. more memory, .... and it works.
My HP 28C is still going well - this last battery set was fresh - lasts a long time. Prior sets were likely shelf dead and then sold.
I have a software for my Sony Clie / PDA - MathU Pro - an HP programmable calculator. They make PDA replacements.
Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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Stealth Pilot wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Hmm ... I thought that was what the 'C' in the model number of the 15C *was* -- CMOS. Mine runs for years on three SR357 cells, as does the companion 16C (computer math version). And the two of them take up less space together than most of the others did, except perhaps my wife's 25.
And to keep it metal-related, I use a spare 15C in the shop, where it lives in a Ziploc baggie (facing backwards) to protect it from oil and swarf, let allow it to be used.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I'm pretty sure the 'C' in HP calculator designations means it has their 'continuous' memory feature. In other words, it doesn't forget the stack and other register contents when shut off. (As far as I'm concerned, 'off' is really very low current draw 'stand by' mode.)
BTW, I also had 32SII keyboard issues... otherwise, it was a GREAT machine
If you have a 16C, sell it and retire. I'm not kidding... take a look at what they're going for on e-Bay...
Erik
Reply to
Erik
According to Erik :
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But how would you implement this other than with CMOS (at least for the memory), especially given the relatively tiny batteries used?
Sure -- but I think that implies CMOS as well to implement that feature.
Only if I can get a functional replacement. I use it too much to get rid of it.
And I am *already* retired -- though extra income would be nice. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
We're both right, see 'HP-25C' here...
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Erik
Reply to
Erik
I've been usin my 10C for YEARS and still on the orig batterys. I had a 21 along time ago which did have the keys quit working. Just recently got one (it's at school now so don't remember the number) but it need batterys already. "Don't use a calculator with an equal sign" :-) ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick

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