New Lightweight Exoskeleton Suit being developed

Came across this the other day and thought it looked pretty cool. Can think of a lot of uses and it actually looks affordable.
"A lightweight exoskeleton will allow the elderly to move around more easily. New Scientist heads to a Japanese laboratory to try it on for size."
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21428614.800-wearable-muscle-suit-makes-heavy-lifting-a-cinch.html
There are some videos around for it too. Check youtube. Maybe:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW2pBLQLHj0

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http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21428614.800-wearable-muscle-suit-makes-heavy-lifting-a-cinch.html
Pretty cool, but the reporter needed help to lift 40 kg?
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On Thu, 26 Apr 2012 17:52:39 -0400

<snip>
I noticed that too, but they are aiming the product at people with physical aliments (shrug). Still can remember unloading ~30 tons of fertilizer in 80lb bags many years ago. I could show off back then carrying three bags at a time, once at least :)
The article got me searching on PAM's though (pneumatic artificial muscle). This place in London has them for sale, along with some info on use and design:
http://www.shadowrobot.com/airmuscles/overview.shtml
They don't/won't publish longevity though. I could see where these (PAM's) could have uses in other products too. I know Tom G. and Lloyd S. both make/use stuff that needs some sort of pulling power...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McKibben_artificial_muscle
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I prefer:
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqzHdKqZAmo

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Interesting research and engineering, Leon. As I was reading I was relating the pneumatic assist effect to a cuff-type wrist-wrap blood pressure meter that uses a tiny pump to inflate a bladder in the wrist cuff.
These cuff-type BP meters are a bit larger than a Dick Tracy wrist radio, but the pressure from the little pump applies considerable pressure in the cuff.. and from just a couple of AAA batteries which last for many tests.
FWIW, larger bladders are used by fire/rescue teams for lifting heavy objects and/or vehicles.
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2012 13:23:43 -0400, Leon Fisk

From the Narioka info:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIq3M06Rsvc
and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cgo7RZZqrXM

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On Mon, 30 Apr 2012 11:43:09 -0700
<big snip>

Thanks for those links Larry. I have a slow internet connection so I only go after videos that maybe worth viewing and can find a way to download. Those are pretty good. The crawling "Pneuborn" in the first video is somewhat creepy. Especially once you see how big it really is (baby child size). It doesn't help any that I'm currently reading (about 2/3rds through) "Robopocalypse" by Daniel H. Wilson either. See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robopocalypse
Written a bit oddly, a bunch of snippets strung together as chapters, but pretty compelling nonetheless. Really thought provoking when you realize just how many of the compromised hardware/computers in it are already in place today...
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wrote:

I didn't think Pneuborn was very lifelike at all, especially without a skin: too jerky, too precise. The frog was outstanding, OTOH. YMMV.

Sounds like fun. I found a copy at my library and put a hold on it. Yeah, I'm waiting for SkyNet to happen any day now, once some idiot gets the bright idea to let the computer do his thinking for him... <g>
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wrote:

Too close to non-fiction for my tastes, I think. =:-0
From Amazon's description: The story begins and ends in Los Angeles, which is no longer part of what is left of the United States, during the early 21st century. In this hypothetical future reality, the federal government of the United States has ceded most of its power to private organizations and entrepreneurs.[3] Franchising, individual sovereignty and private vehicles reign (along with drug trafficking, violent crime, and traffic congestion). Mercenary armies compete for national defense contracts while private security guards preserve the peace in gated, sovereign housing developments. Highway companies compete to attract drivers to their roads rather than the competitors', and all mail delivery is by hired courier. The remnants of government maintain authority only in isolated compounds where they transact tedious make-work that is, by and large, irrelevant to the dynamic society around them.
Much of the territory ceded by the government has been carved up into sovereign enclaves, each run by its own big business franchise (such as "Mr. Lee's Greater Hong Kong") or the various residential burbclaves (suburban enclaves). This arrangement resembles anarcho-capitalism, a theme Stephenson carries over to his next novel The Diamond Age. Hyperinflation has devalued the dollar to the extent that trillion dollar bills Ed Meeses are nearly disregarded and the quadrillion dollar note the Gipper is the standard 'small' bill. For physical transactions people resort to alternative, non-hyperinflated currencies such as yen or "Kongbucks" (the official currency of Mr. Lee's Greater Hong Kong).
-- Aim for success, not perfection. Never give up your right to be wrong, because then you will lose the ability to learn new things and move forward with your life. -- Dr. David M. Burns
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On Thu, 03 May 2012 13:05:49 -0700

<snip>
<snip>
Oh! that makes it sound pretty dull, bureaucratic... Trust me, give it a go. At least give the first two chapters a read and see if you aren't hooked ;-)
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wrote:

OK, maybe. Filed for future reference.
I just brought home two John Ringo books (_Road to Damascus_ and _Against the Tide_), Robopocalypse, and Food, Inc. today. And I'm not done with _Quiet_ yet, so I'm full up for now. I suck down Ringo and Marcinko books very fast, so at least two of those will be history next week.
Not to mention that I need to come up to speed on Mach3, BobCAD, and BobART Pro post haste...
-- Aim for success, not perfection. Never give up your right to be wrong, because then you will lose the ability to learn new things and move forward with your life. -- Dr. David M. Burns
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wrote:

I took you up on the suggestion of _Robopocalypse_ and was glad. Pretty good. OK, on to _Snow Crash_. My library has a copy.
-- Progress is the product of human agency. Things get better because we make them better. Things go wrong when we get too comfortable, when we fail to take risks or seize opportunities. -- Susan Rice
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On Wed, 23 May 2012 04:44:54 -0700
<snip>

Yes, that one was pretty good. I can hardly wait for the "smart cars" to get on the road. Not so much a worry like in the story, but just the whole can-of-worms it will open up. You know darn well people will be busting butt to hack into the systems for numerous reasons...

Tit for tat...
I have two chapters to go in "The Road to Damascus". _Long_ but GOOD book. I was having doubts in the early chapters with all the "POPPA" politics and propaganda... but it is really rolling now :) I'll be a bit bummed though if several main characters don't make it. I've become rather attached to them. Thanks for tweaking my interest ;-)
Do you have an eReader yet? A lot of Ringo's titles are available for free from links on this Wiki page (seems legit too):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ringo
I'll probably try reading a few more of his eventually...
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    O.K. That one I have not yet read. I've been reading his "Boroque cycle" books recently, and currently am on _Anathem_. My first book by him was _Cryptonomicon_, which I particularly liked.

    That one I have read, and I think that you will like it.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 5/23/2012 6:04 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Also check out "The Diamond Age", which is the first of his I read. I just finished "Reamde" which was OK, but not as good as "Cryptonomicon" or the Baroque Cycle.
David
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On Wed, 23 May 2012 13:43:13 -0400, Leon Fisk

I finally cracked it last night and will read it over the weekend. Yeah, about the second chapter, I was wondering if I was going to finish it, but now that I'm at the tenth, I'm glad I did. Sonny is one helluva machine.

Start with _Ghost_ (Paladin of Shadows series), then continue with Kildar. <g> His Looking Glass series is physics gone crazy. I think Terry Pratchett should have used his style. (I might have been able to -read- him, then.) If you like military sci-fi, his Posleen War series is absolutely stunning. http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/r/john-ringo / David Drake is another top-drawer MilSciFi king, as is David Weber. I didn't even know I like it until I read a book by each of these three. They're like potato chips: you can't put 'em down.
My buddy in D.C. turned me on to W.E.B. Griffin, whose Corps and Presidential Agent series books are absolutely wonderful, and Stephen Hunter, whose 2 Swagger series are outrageously good.
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/g/w-e-b-griffin / http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/h/stephen-hunter /
-- When a quiet man is moved to passion, it seems the very earth will shake. -- Stephanie Barron (Something for the Powers That Be to remember, eh?)
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On Thu, 24 May 2012 05:49:17 -0700
First, thanks to everyone, Don, David and Larry for your suggestions on where to go/start next. I'm in no way lacking for books to read, but I'll be adding more of your Ringo suggestions to my reading as time permits.
<snip>

Yup, I feel the same way. You'll have to bust some butt though, that tome is about three times longer than most books. I convert them to audio/mp3 files and listen to them while out walking or getting in my exercise. I can read just fine but that is when I have the most time available for perusing fiction. Seeing that my audio conversion sets a pretty steady pace it really gives good insight into how long any text is.
<snip>

I've frequented used book sales for ~20 years. Used to pick up W.E.B. Griffin stuff for my old boss. I knew it was pretty popular because it turns up a lot at the sales. Haven't tried any myself yet. My tastes are all over the place (Western, SciFi, Classic, Mystery...) except I don't go for biographies.
Have you read any of the "Hunger Games" series by Suzanne Collins yet? Supposedly written for young adults... but hey, I liked Harry Potter too. They really smoke along and you will very likely have a hard time putting one down. The whole series (3 books) is about equal in length to "The Road to Damascus".
Another old timer that is somewhat prophetical is "Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley. It isn't very long, but considering it was written in 1931, he had some insight into where we (civilization) was headed years ago... See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brave_new_world
You might find it a bit tedious, but I know I am glad I took the time to read (or rather listen) to it.
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On Thu, 24 May 2012 14:49:10 -0400, Leon Fisk

Interesting. I suppose I should be walking on my days off, too, to help with the high BP. I just don't like sitting doing nothing but listening to audio, so walking just might make it palateable. I'll try it with an old Walkman I have and a cassette from the library.

Ditto, except the mysteries. I read and watched so many in my yout that I am still totally burned out on them. Brit mysteries are quite a bit better, less than ENTIRELY PREDICTABLE. <sigh>

No, I haven't, but my sister may give it to me in a couple months. She buys lots of new books and then recycles them through me when I'm game. I'm a Potter movie fan, too, but haven't read any of the books. And if any of the bloody Muggles don't like this thread, they can darned well hit the "I" key to ignore it.

That he did! I saw the movie eons ago.

Why do you feel that, Leon?
My sister gave me the Harry Dresden novels. I was reluctant to read them at first because the TV series was so absolutely dreadful. The books were a full 180 degrees from that. Very good. Give them a try.
Another series my sister pointed out to me was Gena Showalter's Alien Huntress series. Aliens and vampires, but done for a thinking audience. Sultry spy/action mysteries, if you will. Start with her first one, _Awaken Me Darkly_.
-- When a quiet man is moved to passion, it seems the very earth will shake. -- Stephanie Barron (Something for the Powers That Be to remember, eh?)
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On Thu, 24 May 2012 17:37:45 -0700

<snip>
I use an old iRiver iFP-800 mp3 player. Being able to pause and back-up 20 sec with a simple flip of a switch is priceless. Noisy truck goes by, somebody stops to chat, mind/attention drifts off... flip of the switch and you go back 20 sec and listen to that part again. It also remembers the spot you were at when turned off. Really important features if you try to buy something for listening to books. A lot of libraries have books available on CD now. You could rip them to mp3, reducing the quality down to 32kb and 16khz. You really don't need CD quality for just voice. This is the LAME command line I use for the final wave to mp3 conversion:
lame --noreplaygain -mm -q7 -b32 --resample 16.000 trtd-01.wav trtd-01.mp3
You get some funny noises with the quality (-q7) set that low but it doesn't bother me while out walking and converts to mp3 really fast. I just delete the mp3 files when I'm done so it really doesn't matter.
<snip>

I'm a glutton, still read mysteries but I know what you mean. And I agree, the British authors are usually better.

<snip>
Oh! after reading this bit of insight into your tastes I think you'll like them now for sure. Don't let your sister forget! And make sure you have some time available before diving in. They are really hard to put down...
<snip>

The language is a bit dated now, "...Oh, she's a splendid girl. Wonderfully pneumatic. I'm surprised you haven't had her..." and some people get turned off with such. And it kinda plods along at times (shrug).

<snip>
<snip>
I'll keep these in mind, add to my list. Thanks ;)
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    [ ... ]

    Some mysteries are fun, and not that predictable. One series which I enjoy is the one which starts with _Murder with Peacocks_ by Donna Andrews. The heroine, Meg Lanslow, is a blacksmith artist, which gets some of the stories into our metalworking field. :-) The whole family is strange, which is what makes it so much fun. Probably the one which did the least for me was _Murder with Puffins_, but the rest are loads of fun, in various environments. For example _We'll Always Have Parrots_ takes pace at sort of a science fiction convention -- except that it is dedicated to a particular TV series -- and her (then to be) husband is an actor and a literature professor. Every title has some kind of bird in it -- even if not feathered, such as _Revenge of the Wrought Iron Flamingos_.
    I mostly read science fiction and fantasy, but this series is one (of several) which both my wife and I enjoy.
BTW    Headed to a SF con this weekend -- probably pick up a few more     books. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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