OT - filling small oil cans like 3 in 1

I found many years ago that oil by the galon like WD-40 is cheaper than small cans of three in one. But, how to get the oil from the
galon to the small can?
I took about four inches of surgical tubing, and pressed it onto the end of the squeeze can. Hold the small can with cap up. I took a small pill bottle, and filled it from the big can.
Hold the small can upright, and put the end of the surgical tubing into the small bottle of fluid. As I squeeze the small can, bubbles blew. When I released, fluid came back into the small can.
I'd be squeezing air out, and the fluid stayed in the bottom of the small can. I could refill a small can in a minute or less.
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've been able to snap the plastic spout right out of the can top by prying it with a small screwdriver and then refilling the can through the hole using a small funnel. The spout snaps right back in when I'm done.
Your method is more elegant though. <G>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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I usually mangle the plastic, and it doesn't fit quite right.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Oct 29, 8:11 am, "Stormin Mormon"

Best is to have a pump that lifts from above. I use a lab pipette and a squeezebulb (not quite the same as a big eyedropper, there's valves in the bulb part). The glass part holds 50 ml (about two ounces).
No pouring, no sloshing, no drips, minimal cap-off-the-bottle time. The drawback: for WD-40, it works quick. For 90 wt gear lube, it takes an hour or so to fill the pipette through the little pinhole...
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Another old-timey lab tip that works is to use a rod across the mouth of the supply container, as you pour, the liquid follows the rod due to surface tension, very good for those viscous liquids. Size the rod to the size of the container opening you're trying to fill. In chem lab we used glass rods, a chunk of drill rod or brazing filler will work for oils. The outside of unflared brake line will work, too, as long as it's clean. Just use a thumb to hold the rod across the container neck and don't try to pour fast at first. The larger the rod diameter, the faster you can pour. Try it in the sink with water and an empty bottle first. Works with any size container you can handle. Used to use it with those glass-stoppered acid bottles. Gloves definitely recommended for that.
Stan
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"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message
I found many years ago that oil by the galon like WD-40 is cheaper than small cans of three in one. But, how to get the oil from the galon to the small can?
I took about four inches of surgical tubing, and pressed it onto the end of the squeeze can. Hold the small can with cap up. I took a small pill bottle, and filled it from the big can.
Hold the small can upright, and put the end of the surgical tubing into the small bottle of fluid. As I squeeze the small can, bubbles blew. When I released, fluid came back into the small can.
I'd be squeezing air out, and the fluid stayed in the bottom of the small can. I could refill a small can in a minute or less.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Same problem with acetone. Even with a big funnel more acetone ends up on the bench and on the floor than in the smaller can. A couple of days ago I used some thin tubing to syphon the acetone from a gallon can to a quart can. A small point: Next time I shall use a syringe to get the suction. Ask me why...
-- Michael Koblic, Campbell River, BC
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Tastes like hell, don't it?
When I was a teen, a pharmacist at the store at the end of the street. Dropped a jug of acetone. Which lit up, due to the space heater. He did try a fire extinguisher, and then another. He got out with his life, but the store was a total loss. And serious damage to the stores on either side (strip mall with about six stores).
Please be careful. Please consider your decanting outdoors.
--
Christopher A. Young
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