OT Fuel Sender ?'s

Burning project of the moment is a dead fuel gauge sys on the ol' farm tractor. 70's vintage IHC lots of german made cast iron for
those appreciating that type of stuff.. Anyhow I condemened the origional components and with a Napa gauge and sending unit kit I can get it to work ok but I get a higher reading on the gauge then is indicated..IOW the gauge reads 1/2 full when it should read empty.
Any tricks to get around this that anyone like to share? Some sort of E magic or is it a case of throw away and try again.. I did do some neat metalworking to replicate the OEM sender....hate to waste that.. ED
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wrote:

Even if you got both the sender and gauge from NAPA on the same order, somebody botched it reading the catalog and they didn't give you a matched set - go back and raise a ruckus if necessary.
There are a dozen different resistance range systems for gas gauges, including from memory the most popular 260-0 ohms, 72-0 ohms, 0-90 ohms (backwards - 0 at full 90 at empty)...
The gauge companies make multiple identical-looking gauges for the various systems, only the part numbers are different - so you can put a Stewart-Warner or VDO cluster in a car with a GM or Chrysler or Toyota or Mercedes (or whatever) factory sender without dropping the tank and changing the sender. Or senders for dual tanks.
If it's an aftermarket 2-1/8" style gauge it's probably a lot easier to change the gauge end, once you figure out the one you really need. If you are trying to use a factory gauge movement in an instrument cluster, then you have to change to the right sender range.
Never heard of any "magic bullets" to fix that mismatch, and they would probably cost more than the right gauge movement.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Thu, 21 Feb 2008 08:07:12 -0800, Bruce L. Bergman

Many thanks, I was looking over at Egauges maybe should have gone there instead. , The box says its a 240-33 resistance. It is a standard 2 1/8 style.
In a past life I used to pull the needle off and reset it on Toyotas to get them to read right....never had one comeback dealer tech trick.. ED
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It's simply a matter of extended empty angle VS full tank angle of the float rod. If the sender and gauge are matched, You just adjust/modify the float length to either match the original(Which may or may not be correct...). Better to eyeball the installed height of the sender base to the full level of the fuel, and go from there. The object is to have the gauge read accurately towards empty. If you can't configure it both ways for some reason, it's no biggy if it stays on full for 1/4 tank, and then accurately reads down to empty from there. Being sold by Napa, I suspect the gauge and sender are not matched from your description. If so, tweaking the dimensions won't help. JR Dweller in the cellar
ED wrote:

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When I needed a new fuel gage for an old 66 Chrysler I got a digital readout type. Can be adjusted after installation at the meter, have been happy with that,
Free men own guns - www(dot)geocities(dot)com/CapitolHill/5357/
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nick hull wrote:

Sounds like the sender is not matched to the gauge. Is there a calibration routine?
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