OT Gravel size

I am extending my turnaround that will lead into a pole barn I am
hoping to build and use as a garage. What would be the best size gravel
I can use from my blacktop turn around to the future building?
Soemthing that will work well and level easily as it is on a slight
slope.
Reply to
stryped
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Where do you buy your gravel? Ask them, they will know what to use.
Reply to
Jim
You want what they call "5/8-minus". It's broken gravel, with chunks that will fall through a 5/8" mesh, including all of the finer stuff. It is easy to move and level, but then compacts well. All of the random sizes and edges make it much more stable than would be pea gravel.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in news:1121095205.747091.183680 @z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com:
On new, uncompacted ground, such as you probably have, you really should run 2 different types. Lay down a 3-4" layer of 2" gravel as a base first. These will quickly sink into the ground, stabilize it and provide a good base with use. Then cover the larger 2" gravel with about a 2" layer of 'Crusher run' which is cheap and has everything from powder to 1-1/2" sized. The crusher run will fill in the gaps in the 2" stone and you will have a long lasting good road.
Reply to
Anthony
This is hard, settled ground. Can i just use the crusher run? should I boxin the area to "contain" the gravel?
Reply to
stryped
Around here we just just call out "Class 5" which is a mix of fines through about an inch. Figure at least 6", it needs to be thick enough to form a skin on the top of the subsoil. If you have soft soil or a lot of water, you may want to put down some large crushed rock for drainage first.
The best "Class 5" is made from recycled concrete. A bit of water and compaction from driving on it and it gets really tough. I watched a road construction use 12" of this, then let the public drive over it for 3 weeks before final grading and paving. A small dozer just bounced when he tried to take a skim cut on the stuff.
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
As GWE advises, definitely buy the broken gravel. The other is much less expensive, but it will squish around and never settle.
Steve
Reply to
Steve Smith
The stuff to get is called compacting (compactable ?) road crush around here, and I have no real doubt that it is about the same stuff as all the other guys are telling you to use.
The very best thing to do IMO is to call your local suppliers and ask what they reccomend for the job, that is available in your area. No point in getting your heart set on crushed granite, for example, then finding out it has to be trucked in from the other side of the country.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in news:1121103377.798505.231750 @g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
You could. The plastic lawn edging works pretty well to contain gravel.
Reply to
Anthony
But it is not level and I will need one side much higher than the edging I think.
Reply to
stryped
Stryped, we can give you formulae, conversion factors, and some common experience, but we can't think for you.
Figure out the shape in cross-section. Compute the volume in whatever units you want, then convert it to cubic yards as appropriate. If the cross-section isn't rectangular, think rectangles and triangles built up to fill the area.
It's simple junior-high geometry. If you don't remember the relationships, try reading a book. You know, those funny paper-and-cardboard things with lots of sheets of typed text inside? (no, no, not a "banker's box". A book is something you take information from, not put information into[unless you're the author]).
Here: 1728 cu.in./cu.ft. 27cu.ft./cu.yd. 12in/ft. 36in/yd. volume =area x depth area of a rectangle is length x width Area of right triangle is 1/2(length x height).
those are all the conversions, shapes, and formulae you need to get from your measurements to cubic yards. All of it came from 7th grade.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
You mean after all the posts in your thread about HOW TO LEVEL THE GROUND, and all references to water levels, string levels, laser levels, and other posts previously that you should have read concerning leveling a piece of ground for a pole building (by ignoramus) and all the responses he received concerning this subject, etc., you just ignored their advice and information. Seems like you ask the questions, but don't read the answers. I know a couple of people like this that ask a question about how to do something, and while I'm answering him, he's thinking up another question about something entirely different and never even heard the explanation to the first question. Needless to say I *don't* see him very often. I think you are about to run out of help here.... and that's too bad because there is a helluva lot of knowledgeable people here - some of which I would give an arm and leg just to be able to hang around with for a period of time to *learn more*..... Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
I'd give an arm and leg just to watch this feeb work!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
You probably would, if you stood too close or tried operating something he'd 'fixed'.
I'm all for helping to dispel ignorance, but stupidity is incurable.
Peter Wiley
Reply to
Peter Wiley
Don't buy gravel. Buy highway specification base course, 3/4" maximum gradation. It will compact to an almost concrete consistency with dampening and rolling and you won't feel like you're driving on a pile of marbles. Bugs
Reply to
Bugs
Here in California..this is called "ag base" for some reason.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
"Aggregate/Base" Same material is used for roadbase and concrete aggs.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

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