PING: Iggy

You have any of these? Not related or anything. Just came across this ad.
Working on an old Lincoln SA-200 welding machine with a Red Seal
continental F-163 motor.
Want to Buy --- Service manuals.
http://muskegon.craigslist.org/wan/2765256407.html
--
Steve Walker
snipped-for-privacy@frontierbrain.com (remove brain when replying)
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I have them available online.
http://igor.chudov.com/manuals/Continental-Engines/
I emailed that guy. Maybe it will help him.
Anyone wants a Pipeliner 400 welder with a Perkins 4-262 diesel engine, with only TWO HOURS on the engine? With a military trailer?
i
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He replied, saying that he does not want downloads. I think that his ads is a little bit not genuine, he is not working on anything, he wants to buy them for resale.
i
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It will be comparatively expensive due to 2 hours, Perkins 4.236 engine and military origin (assuming it still works).
It is on trailer with a lot of cabinets etc. Room to put on tanks, a compressor also.
Pix are here
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Military-Hobart-Welder/
I still have to go through the EUC process.
I doubt that I will sell it through this newsgroup ($8k), and will ask for more elsewhere.
i
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$4k, Kind of a lot of money, that's why I have to ask for so much. It cost the military $43k.
http://www.govliquidation.com/auction/view?idI16139&categoryId 04
This is a huge welder, with a 64-80 HP Perkins (depending on who to believe). Of course, I am taking a risk that it is not functional, such as engine rusted inside or the injection pump seals rotted. I am generally optimistic and, to date, I had very good luck with diesel powered equipment.
The price, obviously, assumes that the welder works.
If it works, I will ask for $9-10k elsewhere.
i
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Thanks. I am a little reluctant to paint it. This CARC paint may be good at not absorbing chemical weapons (I have a military chemical weapon alarm for sale right now), but it is really nasty when it comes to removing it, because it is toxic.
i
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By the way... Does anyone know the closes equivalents of that CARC camo paint, what are the closes black and green colors. THanks
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Ignoramus22709 wrote:

You can buy the exact paint at a Sherwin Williams Industrial paint store. Dupont and PPG places will mix it for you as well. BUT you would need to specify that you want CARC paint and not just a color equivalent.
Safe to work with it using a good suit and ASR hood. That is for ALL work with true CARC paint.
Unless you plan on selling the welder back to the military though you would probably be better off blasting the rust, priming and painting with a single color. Also would be MUCH cheaper. The last time I priced real CARC paint it was over $50.00 a quart for two part and almost $75.00 a quart for single part paint. You can buy Federal Yellow for around $100.00 a GALLON
The colors would be
Desert Tan 686 - FS595B Color 33446 Green 383 - FS595B Color 34094 Black - FS595B Color 37030 Brown 383 - FS595B Color 30051
--
Steve W.

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Does anyone have a schematic of the circuit boards in a Lincoln Square Wave TIG 300? I have what Lincoln releases to to public, which is just a wiring diagram of the whole machine. All the PC boards are just squares on the drawing.
When I got it (used) I was able to trace down the bad Tantalum capacitor that caused the shield gas postflow to stay on forever. Now I have a more difficult problem to solve. When the machine is first turned on after a period of not being used, I can't get any arc current. It indicates 72 V and 0-7 Amps on the LED meters, even if the electrode is shorted to the ground clamp. The high frequency works like mad, but there is no main arc current. It seems to take 10-15 minutes of trying, and suddenly jumps to life. This last time I fiddles with the switches again, and that's when it started working, so it could be a dirty contact in the HF start/always/off switch. But, in previous cases it just started working at one point with no flipping of switches.
Has anyone else seen a similar problem with a Lincoln square wave TIG machine? I am suspecting another bad capacitor, but it would be hard to track down without detailed schematics of the boards.
Thanks for any hints in the right direction.
Another problem is the torch is getting plugged up and I have to run the cooler for minutes before there is just the most meager flow. The outlet from the cooler is plenty strong. Is there something I can put in the torch to flush it out? (I discovered the tank in the cooler had slowly evaporated, and was really low. I added a bunch of water. next time at the welding place I will get a new batch of cooler fluid and replace.) I filled it originally with this greenish stuff specifically sold for TIG coolers.
Thanks, again.
Jon
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Jon Elson wrote:

That sounds like you may have some bad electrolytics on the conrtroller board. The ESR drops some as they heat up, and start working.
http://www.radiolocman.com/shem/shem-cache.html?di 764 is a '99 cent ESR meter' and gives some basic information on testing them.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

The main board has dozens of large Tantalum capacitors, and older tantalum caps tend to fail with various symptoms when not kept polarized fairly frequently. I already fixed one bad one that was pretty easy to locate, the postflow timer. This fault, if it is a capacitor, is going to take more detective work.
The board is conformally coated, so any rework is a very painful process involving carving the coating off with an X-acto knife. So, shotgunning all the dozens of caps on the board is not practical.
Jon
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On 12/27/2011 12:28 PM, Jon Elson wrote:

you may want to spend $80 and buy an ESR meter - that will help you find bad caps easily - there is one called "blue" that is a kit, easy to assemble, you can get it from ebay or from the factory
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Bill wrote:

I posted a link to a simple "99 cent" adapter to use a scope to test ESR, upthread.
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Jon Elson wrote:

A hot soldering iron should cut throught the conformal coating. If it is a hard and shiny coating, GC Printkote Solvent may remove it where you need to work. If it's the soft rubbery crap, it can cause problems of it's own. I don't shotgun, I find the failures.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Yes, and that is why knowing which 2 or 3 caps would be the most likely suspects is the only way to deal with this. The Lincoln Square Wave TIG is a rather complicated machine, the main board is about a foot square with several dozen 4000-series CMOS chips on it. I think there is an SCR trigger board that also has over a dozen chips.
Burning through the coating with a soldering iron is hard on the iron and makes a real mess of the board, too, making resoldering difficult later. The coating, as I remember, is the hard stuff.
So, I'm hoping somebody can come up with a diagram of the boards.
Thanks,
Jon
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Jon Elson wrote:

CMOS is sensitive to spikes on the power rails. It sounds like someone should make a replacement board with modern ICs. It wouldn't be that difficult, with a schematic of the original board.

I use a cheap soldering iron I ought for a buck for that kind of work. As long as you wipe the crap off and keep it tinned, it will last a long time.

That does make it easier. :)
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Obviously, Lincoln has this figured out. If operating inside a welder with 300+ Amps and the HF system going doesn't upset it or cause random failures, they did their homework correctly.
I also use 4000-series CMOS in servo amps with 120+ V and 20 Amps, because they can run off 12 V rails, therefore more immune to electrical noise.
Jon
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Jon Elson wrote:

They will run off CLEAN 12 volt rails. Get some noise or ripple on the supply rails or in the ground circuit and they get flaky, or go into lockup which can destroy the chips. The 4000 series was the worst of the CMOS families for problems. The 74c, 74 HC and 74 HCT families are much better. BTDT, spent a lot of time with a scope to track down erratic operation in CMOS circuits. One turned out to be bad PEM studs where the board was mounted to the chassis and a ground loop was modulating the supposed ground.
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Gunner Asch wrote:

I'd greatly appreciate it! I have the machine wiring, which is helpful, but no details on the boards themselves.
Jon
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Gunner Asch wrote:

If you have board level schematics, I'd love to have a copy.
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