Ping Lloyd: Blue Fireworks?

My wife heard something on the radio about how you could judge the quality (or maybe the expense) of a fireworks show by how much blue was included.

I noticed that, in our town's fireworks show (which is never very good, but still fun to watch with a beer in hand from my back yard), there was virtu ally no pure blue. There were various shades of purple and some bluish whit e, but I think I only saw one single pure blue burst.
I also watch the NY and DC shows on TV. While they did have some blue, ther e was not nearly as much as there was of the other colors.
So what's the deal with that?
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Blue is not so difficult to produce, nor a 'sign of quality'. But blues are dim compared to all the other colors we can make. Therefore, even when included, they often don't show well. Because they're dim, they aren't perceived as being as spectacular as other colors.
There are really no secrets to producing blue fireworks, although a 'good' blue is difficult to obtain. Most folks settle for a somewhat whitish blue that is brighter, and works better with other colors.
They are not more expensive to make.
Lloyd
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On Tuesday, July 16, 2013 11:26:28 AM UTC-4, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

OK, Thanks for the clarification.
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https://www.google.com/#output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q=veline+color+system
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volley in

PT, The Veline (Bob Veline, an acquaintance) color system is a good 'starting point' for the general color spectrum.
It's primary benefits are that all the colors are compatible formulae that may be further mixed to produce the whole spectrum.
That said, they're metal-fueled colors, so they burn hot and tend toward white-ish in saturation. "True blues" must burn cool, so the Veline blue is not a very good one. A good blue uses an organic fuel, so is dim in light output, and wouldn't match the luminance of the other Veline colors, if so-done.
They're not the best 'professional' colors, but they're a terrific place for a beginning amateur fireworker to start. (Amature -even unlicensed- manufacturing is legal, by the way, depending upon where you live)
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

https://www.google.com/#output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q=veline+color +sys

'starting

toward

blue

in

place

unlicensed-

Yeah it's been a while, I eventually got bored with the hobby...I never used the Veline system `personally although I was certainly tempted because it would have allowed me to substantially reduce my chemical inventory.
BTW, I've got quite a few chemicals stashed away still, any advise on about to best sell or otherwise dispose of them would be appreciated...
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Engage in the "Passfire.com" web site, and/or the "Fireworking.com" site.
Amateurs of all skill levels participate there, and there's always a ready market for surplus chems.
Lloyd
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Pink Floyd Blue Fireworks?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
804yPkeAQ
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