Plain bearing example

Hi folks,
I need an example for an article. Can anyone think of a modern product whic h uses plain bearings in a demanding application? I'm not talking about the
extremes (like dental drills and steam turbines), but more common applicat ions such as supporting lathe spindles and engine crankshafts. It used to b e common to have plain bearings in these machines, and some were incredibly durable, but I haven't seen any in a new product for a long time. Are ther e any examples, or have they been entirely displaced by standardised ball a nd roller bearings?
Thanks!
Chris
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On Tue, 6 Dec 2016 05:07:30 -0800 (PST)

The front wheel bearings on my Poulan Pro light garden tractor/mower (Husqvarna, Craftsman, Electrolux) are just sleeve/flange:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
A really unusual bearing application was the use of wood for the bearings in an hydroelectric power house turbine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. It was installed around the mid 1930's and as far as I know is still in use. It was some odd type of wood. It ran wet, in the water going through if I recall correctly...
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On Tuesday, December 6, 2016 at 8:34:55 AM UTC-5, Leon Fisk wrote:

hich uses plain bearings in a demanding application? I'm not talking about the extremes (like dental drills and steam turbines), but more common appli cations such as supporting lathe spindles and engine crankshafts. It used t o be common to have plain bearings in these machines, and some were incredi bly durable, but I haven't seen any in a new product for a long time. Are t here any examples, or have they been entirely displaced by standardised bal l and roller bearings?

B00XR0YJ3E/

'Sounds like lignum vitae. They were used for a lot of bearings in the past , including steam engines and water wheels.
Here's a company that still supplies them:
http://www.lignum-vitae-bearings.com/products/nsf-61-certified-bearing/wood -bearings/
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On Tue, 6 Dec 2016 06:07:51 -0800 (PST) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Off the top of my head that sounds right. Something went amiss and caused it to dry out, seize up. They fixed the water problem, broke it loose again and it continued in operation. I use to talk with the man in charge of the operation ~20 years ago. He had long retired but still kept in touch with his old employer, fellow workers. At that time it was still in use, even after that mishap.
Pretty cool for a wood bearing :)
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On Tue, 6 Dec 2016 05:07:30 -0800 (PST), Christopher Tidy

Automotive engines are still plain bearings. Main, Rod and camshaft. Lfters and rocker arms can be found with needle bearing nowdays.
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
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On Tuesday, December 6, 2016 at 8:07:33 AM UTC-5, Christopher Tidy wrote:

ich uses plain bearings in a demanding application? I'm not talking about t he extremes (like dental drills and steam turbines), but more common applic ations such as supporting lathe spindles and engine crankshafts. It used to be common to have plain bearings in these machines, and some were incredib ly durable, but I haven't seen any in a new product for a long time. Are th ere any examples, or have they been entirely displaced by standardised ball and roller bearings?

The large majority of IC engines use plain bearings, and always have. Honda 's experience with motorcycle engines in the '60s is instructive. They used roller crankshaft bearings until their development work actually showed le ss friction was developed with the latest plain bearings and lubricants. II RC, the first engine for which they switched to plain bearings was the 4-cy linder 750, in the late '60s.
Be careful with a couple of points about plain bearings. "Hydrodynamic" bea rings are those in which the rotating shaft drags lubricant around with it to maintain a film. The pressure of the oil supply in this case, as in auto mobile engines, has nothing to do with the film. It's just a supply for the oil to get *into* the bearings.
"Hydrostatic" bearings are those in which oil is supplied at much higher pr essure and the film is maintained by that external pressure, even if the sh aft is not rotating at the time. Thus the "static" part.
High-speed milling and grinding spindles in some of the more exotic machine tools look like plain bearings, but the film in their case is air -- pneum ostatic. There also were pneumodynamic bearings used in toolpost grinders b efore 1925 or so. They ran hardened-and-polished steel spindles, running in hardened-and-polished steel bushings, at up to 10,000 - 12,000 rpm. There was no external air supply. They just dragged air around dynamically, like a car engine does with oil, and the air created a lubricating film when the spindle got up to speed.
You're dealing with a potentially complex subject. Good luck!
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On Tuesday, December 6, 2016 at 8:07:33 AM UTC-5, Christopher Tidy wrote:

ich uses plain bearings in a demanding application? I'm not talking about t he extremes (like dental drills and steam turbines), but more common applic ations such as supporting lathe spindles and engine crankshafts. It used to be common to have plain bearings in these machines, and some were incredib ly durable, but I haven't seen any in a new product for a long time. Are th ere any examples, or have they been entirely displaced by standardised ball and roller bearings?

The center bearing on the Garrett Airesearch air cycle machines on a Boeing 767 is a plain bearing. Basically a backwards turbocharger that expands hi gh pressure/volume engine bleed air to cool it for the ship's cabin. Very h igh speed operation. Uses the incoming air as a lubricant film in the beari ng. There are Teflon ribbons between the bearing surfaces to prevent damage until full pressure and support takes place after the inlet valve is opene d.
Garrett
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On Tue, 6 Dec 2016 05:07:30 -0800 (PST), Christopher Tidy

Are clutch pilot bearings still sintered bronze? That's a dusty, dirty, hot, and demanding application.
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On Tue, 06 Dec 2016 08:56:02 -0800, Larry Jaques

Clutch? What's a clurtch? - seriously - yes , some are still sintered bronze but many are either roller/needle or ball as well.
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    [ ... ]

    Well -- the MGA (1956 to I think around 1964) used needle roller bearings for the clutch pilot, and the throwout bearing was a graphite ring in a cup applied to a hardened steel ring..
    The needle roller bearing was not an assembly, but rather a cluster of needles which you put in place with some grease to hold them until the input shaft pilot was into place.
    Enjoy,         DoN.     
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    [ ... ]

    What was the original engine size in the '53 TD? The MGA came with 1498 CC, 1598 CC, and 1622 CC IIRC. I understand that the 1498 was to avoid a punitive tax on engines larger than 1500 CC in the UK at that time. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Monday, December 12, 2016 at 10:27:21 PM UTC-5, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Could you work all the pedals without hitting two at once in your MGA? I have wide feet, and the narrowness down among the pedals is what turned me off. For me, a heel-and-toe was impossible in that car. My MG Midget had more room.
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    [ ... ]

    I could individually operate all the pedals, but I also took advantage of the closeness to trade off brake and accelerator by using the sides of a single foot. Useful while sitting at a light with a steep uphill, so I could zap the engine as I was coming off the clutch and let the brake off at the same time. :-) (Already, there were so many driving automatic transmissions that had no idea that it would be polite to leave a little room for the uphill person to roll back as he got a manual transmission car started after a light change.
BTW -- In the MGA (at least the one in the US) the passenger could     operate the accelerator. There was a crank over the trans tunnel     conveying the pedal operation to the right side where the     accelerator linkage cable to the carbs was attached. You could,     as a passenger, hook a toe under the crank and lift to goose the     engine and surprise the driver. :-)
    And the clutch and brake were moved to the left side for the USA     by simply unbolting the dual hydraulic cylinder and re-bolting     it on the new driver's side.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at 9:42:32 PM UTC-5, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Aha! Yes, I remember that some writer, writing about the MGA, called it "to e-and-toe." I don't think that my toes would easily adapt to multitasking. d8-) Drag braking was just becoming accepted as a racing technique (late '6 0s), and there was already a hell of a lot going on when you engaged in tha t.
And, with the close-ratio racing crashbox I put in my Midget, I had to heel -and-toe double-clutch to get down into second gear when coming into a tigh t turn at speed. That would give the two sides of your foot a workout...

The Brits'idea of a practical joke, no doubt.

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On Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at 10:39:34 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrot e:

toe-and-toe." I don't think that my toes would easily adapt to multitasking . d8-) Drag braking was just becoming accepted as a racing technique (late '60s), and there was already a hell of a lot going on when you engaged in t hat.
For "drag braking" read "trail braking." My memory is getting a little blun t on the edges...
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wrote:

1292 cc XPAG
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wrote:

Then there were the 2 liter and 3500 Rovers --_

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    [ ... ]

    This was some place which specialized in tuning Ferraris and the like, and probably did not see too many MGAs. The carbs and air cleaners on it were from the 1622 CC MGA engine to make them fit. IIRC the coolant pump was also from the MGA engine, so it looked pretty similar. The rear mounting plate was also from the MGA. So all told, it looked pretty much like an MGA engine. Perhaps tweaking the needles in the carbs would have made a difference.
    [ ... ]

    The molly grease, or the long-string bearing grease? I was talking about the Molly grease, and I needed it for re-lubing a boring/facing head made by Gamet after having to use a lot of heat to release some loctite holding the spindle adaptor on. (NTMB-30, FWIW).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

But were the plugs, points, and condenser the same? I wutna thunk so. </rhetoricals> >> I ran out a long time ago, but I haven't had the need for it in a long

Long grain parboiled, Don. Tubs of moly grease are a dime a dozen.
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On Tue, 13 Dec 2016 21:27:41 -0800, Larry Jaques

Well, if it was pre '74 it used the same points as the A. The plugs on the A were generally a bit colder than the B - Stock1962 A used a Champion N5C. The 1862 B used RN9YC - Close enough not to tip off the tuner if he looked at what was there and how it burned - and replaced the plugs accordingly. A st if N4 or N% plugs in a tuned B might be just about perfect - - -
So, the answer is yes, the tuneup parts were pretty much the same (on the pre-emission control engines, anyways)

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