Polishing Shop

Hi all,
I'm looking to retire shortly and need advice on whether to start new
business >
I want to form a metal Polishing/ChormePlating company in the UK. My main
interest of work will be Classic Cars/ Bikes . I have the capital,
enthusiasm, and drive to make a go of it. Any body out there can offer ANY
advice greatly appreciated.
I understand the UK is about to be hit by loads of new Regs concerning
chemicals etc. Can anyone throw any light on this ?
Lastly, any pit-falls I should expect!! (YEP, I BET THERE'S LOADS) but I
really want do this.
Cheers !!
PAUL
Reply to
phv
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concerning
Paul,my plater was talking the other week about a new load of regs due in 2006. The best people to ask are the EPA/SEPA in England/Scotland. I know there is a demand for this type of work in Scotland but the thought of all the regs that would apply is enough to put me off.I would think that if you asked around the small finishing companies in your area,you would probably find some would be for sale.IMHO buying a ready made company would be preferable as you would have an income while spending money meeting the regs. Effluent disposal,chemical storage and handling,dust extraction and all the licences (=A3`s) will be the major problems/cost.Big fines nowadays for flouting the law.I think if I was to do it I would do the polishing and sub the plating. regards,Mark.
Reply to
mark
Only advice I can offer is to run screaming in the other direction fron any idea of doing the plating. Aside from the issues, in the new state of stupid paranoia regarding chemicals that may have use in making weapons of any sort, there is also the ever increasing restrictions and liability to do with the possible release of heavy metals into the environment. I have a slight knowledge of what the laws are like here in Canada, and cannot beleive the nanny state of Britain could possibly be easier to deal with. Get advice from, among others, your local health and welfare office, and a good lawyer that knows environmental law in your area.
Will you still be liable for site cleanup if chrome residue is detected on the worksite 20 years after the shop shuts down?
Polishing. If you are the one planning on doing the actual work, build a shower into the shop plans, and expect to get filthy when working. A couple polishing stations in separate rooms to contain the filth is also a good idea. Then wear full coveralls and a respirator when working.
If you are planning to have employees, you really need to assess the H&S aspects of operating a buisness to ensure that you do not end up on the wrong end of a summons.
I worked polishing bike parts in a bike shop for a couple years part time. We sent out all the plating. One of the shops we used said that they would have quit years ago except that it would cost them too much to clean up the site for sale... Dunno if they are still open or not, that was almost 20 years back. Environmental laws have gotten more stringent all the time.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
What the others said....
Here in NYC, the mecca of well, everything except agriculture, plating/heat treating has really taken a hit. Mebbe a couple left. The rest are in NJ.
Also seems that people who work for regulatory agencies are culled partially for their character-disordered-ness, partially for their stupidity. But, they don't miss much, dat's f'sure.
But, this all could just as well spell opportunity iffin you can handle it. Seems like the remaining platers are busy. Specially w/ American Chopper and the apparent genetic craving for custom bikes...
Oh, I was wrong about NYC. Now it is just the mecca of, well, yuppy stockbrokers/daytraders/loiyers, and the housing thereof. Oh, and U-haul storage lockers, preumably for the lesser yupsters. We use NJ for pollution purposes. :) ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
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Proctologically Violated©®

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