Questions about Lincoln 175 TIG

I'm starting to shop around for a TIG machine and ran across a local
ad for a used Lincoln 175 TIG. I've read some comments on this machine
in the archives of this group, but I've still got a few questions:
1) Lincoln's website doesn't have any info on the 175 TIG. Is it still
in production? And if not, does Lincoln have a reputation for
supporting out-of-production equipment?
2) The asking price is $750. I haven't had a chance to talk to the
seller, so I don't know much about it except that it supposedly has
been "used very little". Assuming it's in decent shape and has all the
original equipment (regulator, torch, pedal), is this price smoking,
typical, or inflated for a used 175?
3) Is there anything in particular I should watch out for in a used
175 (common problems, parts that frequently go bad, etc.)?
4) I assume output amps are directly proportional to input amps, so if
I crank the dial much above the half-way point I'll risk popping the
breaker on my 30-amp 220V dryer circuit. Is this a correct assumption?
Would using a water-cooled torch alter the equation at all?
5) (For Ernie) I noticed your comment about this machine not being
particularly good for stick welding. Could you elaborate?
6) What are the odds of finding a used inverter TIG in the same power
range for anywhere near this price?
Bert
Reply to
Bert
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It is probably this machine:
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It was replaced this year by the Precision TIG 185 seen here:
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Lincoln has an excellent reputation for supporting older machines.
Typical.
The only bad thing I can say about this machine is that it isn't a very good stick machine. Open circuit voltage is low.
That's a correct assumption. Maximum input current draw is 65 A. Water cooling the torch doesn't change the input current requirement. What it does is keep your hand cooler while welding.
Not Ernie, but see above about low OCV.
Slim.
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
Yeah what he said.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Thanks for the reply, Gary (and Ernie). I hope to take a look at this machine in the next couple of days.
As for stick welding, I'm thinking the low OCV means you have to maintain a smaller gap between the stick and the work, thus requiring a higher level of skill and perhaps leading to a frustrating experience for someone who hasn't stick welded before, right? I can weld well enough for my needs with TIG, MIG, and oxy-fuel, but I've only tried stick a couple of times, and it didn't go well. Coincidentally, I was using a Lincoln 175 at the time. Now that I know about its stick welding shortcomings, I don't feel quite so incompetent!
One question I forgot to ask before: How much should I expect to spend for a water-cooled torch setup for this machine?
Bert
Reply to
Bert
Re water cooled torch, with 30 amp supply you won't need a water cooled torch. I only have an issue when I'm welding aluminium at over 120 amps for few minutes. The thick aluminium seems to really throw back the heat. I really like my SQW 175.
Brian
Reply to
Brian
I've had one for 8 years. No complaints about the stick performance. My other stick welder is a big welder/generator, I only use that if I need the portability or the extra amps. If the machine you're looking at is in nice shape then $750 asking sounds fair to me.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjk
Just to add one more comment, the SW175 was the model before the SW175 Pro. You can add the optional pulser to the 175 Pro but not the 175. That is the only difference I know of, I own the 175 pro. It is a nice machine, and $750 is a great price for one that wasn't used hard. I wouldn't wait a couple of days to make an offer. John
Reply to
John Caffrey
I added the Lincoln pulser to my older SW175, and it's been working great for about 3 years.
Rex the Wrench
John Caffrey wrote:
Reply to
Rex the Wrench
Torches run around $100, plus about $20 for a water block and hoses. water cooler can be made for under $100, or do what I do. I have a line running from my shop sink, to a water filter. The filtered water goes to the torch, and the return water dumps back to the shop sink.
It has worked for me for 8 years that way.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

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