rebar for hanging street lights - bad idea?

I live in New Hampshire (The Granite State) and have a very long driveway. I am looking at putting up 18 street lamps along the driveway. Bases will be made of concrete as difficult to dig here.
I am thinking to have 1/2" rebar bent into J shape and hanging light fixture at end. Radius would be about 5'. I think the rebar will dance a little in the wind and should have a nice visual effect.
I am concerned that rebar might not be able to stand up tho as it isn't constructed of high grade steel.
Any thoughts?
thanks Bob
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On Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 1:58:24 PM UTC-4, Bob LaFrance wrote:

P.S. Light fixtures only 2 pounds.
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"Bob LaFrance" wrote in message
I live in New Hampshire (The Granite State) and have a very long driveway. I am looking at putting up 18 street lamps along the driveway. Bases will be made of concrete as difficult to dig here.
I am thinking to have 1/2" rebar bent into J shape and hanging light fixture at end. Radius would be about 5'. I think the rebar will dance a little in the wind and should have a nice visual effect.
I am concerned that rebar might not be able to stand up tho as it isn't constructed of high grade steel.
Any thoughts?
thanks Bob ================================================Make one and try it. Exposed bare steel rusts only a few thousandths of an inch per year except where water is trapped against it (the base), then it may pit. The rust color blends well with nature here.
You might try chain link fence top rail, which has reduced ends to connect the lengths and is available in black or galvanized. it can be bent by hand and eye between two closely spaced trees. I use it for my TV antenna mast and straighten it that way after a bad storm bends it. The lamp wire would be protected inside.
I don't know where you are so I picked Nashua https://www.lowes.com/pd/Galvanized-Steel-Chain-Link-Fence-Top-Rail/999989216 https://www.gatecityfence.com/
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Thank you for thoughtful post. I wouldn't attempt to bend by hand. I thin k I can get them done on a machine. See link below. I suppose a higher gr ade of rebar or just some solid bar might be better. Since I have near 18 lights to do I am concerned with cost. The design is fairly done - just do ing details now. I want the lamps in the middle of the driveway. Should b e spectacular if they are on motion sensors. Turning on in front of you wh ile turning off behind you.
On a hilltop in Warner, Just above lake Massasecum.
Thanks Bob

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nv4Gf1aj7SQ

On Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 3:00:03 PM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

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On Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 10:58:24 AM UTC-7, Bob LaFrance wrote:

I'm told that the steel in rebar doesn't take welding well, it gets brittle, so a triangular truss wouldn't give a nice stiff post either. Actual lamp standards are usually spun aluminum (inexpensive cold-worked metal) with bolt-pattern bases that are relatively easy to join to a concrete footing.
I'd buy something like that, not build. Start by looking at parking lot lamps, and note any brandnames on the parts?
Other possibility: you might also want to consider low-level lighting (short posts, light directed down onto path/roadway).
How would these fit into the Granite state? <https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Grey-Lantern-Japanese-Garden-Pagoda-Stone_60231251289.html
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On Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 11:09:27 PM UTC-4, whit3rd wrote:

w
steel in rebar doesn't take welding well, it gets brittle, so a triangular

Some rebar is speced for welding.
I have never had a problem with welding rebar, but it was not for anything that needed high strength.
Dan
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